Read Flight of the Eagle by Peter Watt Online

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From the battlefields of Sudan to colonial Sydney and the Queensland outback, a dreadful curse still inextricably links the lives of the Macintoshes and Duffys.Captain Patrick Duffy is a man torn between the family of his father, Irish Catholic soldier-of-fortune Michael Duffy and his adoring, scheming maternal grandmother, Enid Mackintosh. Visiting the village of his IrisFrom the battlefields of Sudan to colonial Sydney and the Queensland outback, a dreadful curse still inextricably links the lives of the Macintoshes and Duffys.Captain Patrick Duffy is a man torn between the family of his father, Irish Catholic soldier-of-fortune Michael Duffy and his adoring, scheming maternal grandmother, Enid Mackintosh. Visiting the village of his Irish forbears on a quest to uncover the secrets surrounding his birth, Patrick is beguiled by the beautiful, mysterious Catherine Fitzgerald.On the rugged Queensland frontier Native Mounted Police trooper Peter Duffy is torn between his duty, the blood of his mother's people - the Nerambura tribe - and a predestined deadly duel with Gordon James, the love of his sister Sarah.Flight of the Eagle is the stunning conclusion to the trilogy featuring the bestselling Cry of the Curlew and Shadow of the Osprey, and shows master storyteller Peter Watt at the height of his powers....

Title : Flight of the Eagle
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780552147965
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 672 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Flight of the Eagle Reviews

  • Jill Smith
    2018-11-28 19:01

    This is the third book in the continuing saga of the Duffy and McIntosh families shared curse. The blurb describes this as a stunning conclusion to the trilogy although I’m certain that this tale will continue for many more tomes.Peter models his work on the mass-market success format of Wilbur Smith. His canvass is the Queensland outback as a new frontier colony emerges from savage beginnings to become a settled civilized land. The characters are rich and diverse and the readers longing to know what becomes of each of the already well known occupants of Peters’ imagination drives the rapid devouring of the solid volume. Michael Duffy has lived a rugged life in exile in America after partaking in grizzly wars. He returns a mercenary to Australia to discover his son Patrick has been groomed by the McIntosh matriarch Enid McIntosh to take over the family business and disinherit himself from his Duffy clan. Patrick is a born leader and fights bravely for the British in the Sudan. He finds love in the wild Irish hillsides so different from his life in the desert wilderness. Would this Irish Catholic descendant really turn his back on his origins and become the head of an upright Protestant family? The two men meet in a brief bittersweet twist of fate culminating in hopeless battle.The next generation in the family line is well developed in this book. Gordon James and Peter Duffy have left behind their boyhood friendship to become members of the Mounted Police. Eventually they go their separate ways as colour and bigotry continued to get in the way and causes the ever-widening rift between white commander James and dark Trooper Peter Duffy. Sarah, Peter’s very beautiful half-caste sister has captured Gordon’s heart, yet circumstances ensure they never marry.Many other characters weave their magic throughout the book from the seductive Penelope and loyal loving Fiona. Then the remarkable businesswoman Kate Duffy having raised Peter and Sarah alone after the death of Luke and continues to make a future for her family, and onto the more unsavoury Hugh Darlington, and loathsome Granville White.Wallarie the aging skillful native bushman continues to play cat and mouse with the mounted police to evade capture and help take Peter Duffy to his Nerambura tribal land for initiation. The land where it all began is fittingly the place the tale ends, or does it?There is no doubting Peter Watt is a masterful story teller and his work is entertaining, intriguing and much of it is based on historical fact. I can hardly wait for the next edition of the Duffy and McIntosh families entwined lives. I am equally certain anyone who picks up these books and delves into them will feel the same.

  • Lee Belbin
    2018-11-15 17:02

    This third saga in the trilogy by Peter Watt is at least as good as the second. Watt writes very well in portraying the personalities and the nature of the northern Australian landscape and hardships. A few of the themes come together, as one would expect, but they do so in ways that you would not have anticipated. One of the best aspects of this series was the few oddities scattered through it. Lesbians, intrigue with German vs English imperialism and the addition of the Chinese to the Irish-English-Scottish mix. It is a classic true historical context drama - adventure, romance and good vs evil - what more could you ask for?

  • Ray Langrish
    2018-12-04 20:15

    As good as wilburLove these books. If you enjoy Wilbur Smith's early work you will enjoy this series. The good thing is I have 9 more books to go

  • Jill Smith
    2018-12-09 01:09

    Book Review By Jill Smith © June 2003This is the third book in the continuing saga of the Duffy and McIntosh families shared curse. The blurb describes this as a stunning conclusion to the trilogy although I’m certain that this tale will continue for many more tomes.Peter models his work on the mass-market success format of Wilbur Smith. His canvass is the Queensland outback as a new frontier colony emerges from savage beginnings to become a settled civilized land. The characters are rich and diverse and the readers longing to know what becomes of each of the already well known occupants of Peters’ imagination drives the rapid devouring of the solid volume. Michael Duffy has lived a rugged life in exile in America after partaking in grizzly wars. He returns a mercenary to Australia to discover his son Patrick has been groomed by the McIntosh matriarch Enid McIntosh to take over the family business and disinherit himself from his Duffy clan. Patrick is a born leader and fights bravely for the British in the Sudan. He finds love in the wild Irish hillsides so different from his life in the desert wilderness. Would this Irish Catholic descendant really turn his back on his origins and become the head of an upright Protestant family? The two men meet in a brief bittersweet twist of fate culminating in hopeless battle.The next generation in the family line is well developed in this book. Gordon James and Peter Duffy have left behind their boyhood friendship to become members of the Mounted Police. Eventually they go their separate ways as colour and bigotry continued to get in the way and causes the ever-widening rift between white commander James and dark Trooper Peter Duffy. Sarah, Peter’s very beautiful half-caste sister has captured Gordon’s heart, yet circumstances ensure they never marry.Many other characters weave their magic throughout the book from the seductive Penelope and loyal loving Fiona. Then the remarkable businesswoman Kate Duffy having raised Peter and Sarah single-handedly after the death of Luke and continues to make a future for her family, and onto the more unsavoury Hugh Darlington, and loathsome Granville White.Wallarie the aging skilful native bushman continues to play cat and mouse with the mounted police to evade capture and help take Peter Duffy to his Nerambura tribal land for initiation. The land where it all began is fittingly the place the tale ends, or does it?There is no doubting Peter Watt is a masterful story teller and his work is entertaining, intriguing and much of it is based on historical fact. I can hardly wait for the next edition of the Duffy and McIntosh families entwined lives. I am equally certain anyone who picks up these books and delves into them will feel the same.

  • JohnLynch
    2018-12-02 01:11

    Thoroughly enjoyed this read as it moved through many characters and their adventures and yet linked .I have enjoyed this book and the drama between the McIntos and the Duffy families and the story between Australia, Africa and Ireland and the link as it unfolded. A good read mm

  • Peter Metcalfe
    2018-11-12 22:24

    Plenty of plot and characters in this tale of early Australia