Read Out of the Wreck I Rise: A Literary Companion to Recovery by Neil Steinberg Sara Bader Online

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“There’s still time to change things.”—Siri Hustvedt, The Blazing World Addiction is easy to fall into and hard to escape. It destroys the lives of individuals, and has a devastating cost to society. The National Institute of Health estimates seventeen million adults in the United States are alcoholics or have a serious problem with alcohol. This scourge affects not only“There’s still time to change things.”—Siri Hustvedt, The Blazing World Addiction is easy to fall into and hard to escape. It destroys the lives of individuals, and has a devastating cost to society. The National Institute of Health estimates seventeen million adults in the United States are alcoholics or have a serious problem with alcohol. This scourge affects not only those who drink or use drugs but also their families and friends, who witness the horror of addiction. Both the afflicted and those who love them are often baffled by what is happening, never mind what to do about it. With Out of the Wreck I Rise, Neil Steinberg and Sara Bader have created a resource like no other—one that harnesses the power of literature, poetry, and creativity to illuminate what alcoholism and addiction are all about, while forging change, deepening understanding, and even saving lives. Structured to follow the arduous steps to sobriety, the book marshals the wisdom of centuries and explores essential topics, including the importance of time, navigating family and friends, Alcoholics Anonymous, relapse, and what Raymond Carver calls “gravy,” the reward that is recovery. Each chapter begins with advice and commentary followed by a wealth of quotes to inspire and heal. The result is a mosaic of observations and encouragement that draws on writers and artists spanning thousands of years—from Seneca to David Foster Wallace, William Shakespeare to Patti Smith. The ruminations of notorious drinkers like John Cheever, Charles Bukowski, and Ernest Hemingway shed light on the difficult process of becoming sober and remind the reader that while the literary alcoholic is often romanticized, recovery is the true path of the hero. Along with traditional routes to recovery—Alcoholics Anonymous, out-patient therapy, and intensive rehabilitation programs—this literary companion offers valuable support and inspiration to anyone seeking to fight their addiction or to a struggling loved one....

Title : Out of the Wreck I Rise: A Literary Companion to Recovery
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780226140131
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Out of the Wreck I Rise: A Literary Companion to Recovery Reviews

  • Rome Doherty
    2019-02-05 19:39

    I found this a great compilation of quotes about recovery. There's tons of stuff out there about the abyss of addiction, less about the complexities of recovery. Any book with quotes from Yeats, Keith Richards and Seneca has got to be good. My favorite from today is Roddy Doyle: "One day at a time, Sweet Jesus. Whoever wrote that one hadn't a clue. A day is a fucking eternity."

  • Kristen
    2019-01-27 22:48

    The only way you will know if you need to read this book is to start reading it. If you find yourself in it, you will read it again and again, finding something a little different every time. Like recovery itself.

  • Tom Christie
    2019-01-24 17:44

    WonderfulThis book is a great guide to where I have been able to travel with many other brothers and sisters! Like the Big Book, I will re-read many times to find experience, strength and hope. 35 years so far.

  • Nicole
    2019-02-13 15:30

    I found this book was very detailed at the chapter breaks. A lot of the quotes and poems were really inspirational. This book brought back a lot of memories for me because my mother was an alcoholic. She never would admit it though while she was alive. I went to Al-Anon meetings for a while, but like this novel points out in one of the quotes.. it's a lot of crying. Every week I would feel the pain that others were going thru and it broke my heart. I stopped going, it helped and it didn't at the same time. This novel just brought back for me a lot of stuff I've repressed since the death of my mother. I would recommend this to anyone who has dealt with alcoholism, or knows someone going through it...it's a short read with a positive outlook

  • Gretchen Lida
    2019-02-10 17:31

    If I were a wealthy woman. I would leave stacks of this book outside AA meetings and therapists offices. I would stash a couple on the L trains and leave in piles outside art schools and cow boy bars in my home state. It does what good poetry often needs to do and finds a truth that prose can’t reach with out a bit of help. This little book on addiction is not just beautiful it is also careful, helpful and honest. Yet some how it never falls into the man hole of shame. It seems to hold the reader close and say, “ hey I see you, you are not alone and you can get through this.” Then a choir of writers great and humble of others rise up to join in the chorus.

  • Shana O'Keefe
    2019-02-10 18:44

    What an awesome book! I'm always eager to find more relevant books on recovery than the outdated and male-centric Big Book of AA. This is perfect, intertwining general epithets with real adventures in recovery from names you know.

  • Michael Owen
    2019-02-04 16:42

    Well written and attainable. Raw and unapologetic. A realistic look at addiction through the eyes of witnesses - folks who have been there. It gave me language for dealing with my own addictive behaviors and personality. As well as hope for ways to move forward.

  • Dan
    2019-02-07 22:47

    At one time (actually several) Alcoholism nearly destroyed my life--and as a side effect, my ability to follow a creative path. I don't talk about it much, because those who have not been there can not understand (not that I really do either.) I struggled for 10 years in and out of AA, but could not manage to cobble together more than a year or two of sobriety. Meanwhile the wreckage mounted. On New Year's eve of 1996 after a 2 years of sobriety and a year into the aftermath of a horrible divorce, I found myself more alone than I have ever felt. So I got drunk. The next morning I swore it off for (hopefully) the last time. I knew then, in the core of my being, that quitting drinking would not fix the underlying discontent and profound unease I felt with life. I wish I could say that those feelings did not return from time to time and that I have triumphed over alcoholism. I wish I could say that the underlying emotional distress did not still hinder me in painful ways. But I have not. I have so much to be grateful for. I have a beautiful wife, an amazing family, and wonderful friends. I love my life today even with those shadows that persist. So, at 20 years sober - I bought myself a present today, mostly to remind me, in the voices of other creatives who have suffered, that I must never forget where I came from. - in hopes there are others who might find this book useful, I post a link. I've read a few pages so far. It looks really good. I will let you know.