Read In the Dark Room: A Journey in Memory by Brian Dillon Online

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Boldly combining the highly personal with the brilliantly scholarly, In the Dark Room explores the question of how memory works emotionally and culturally. It is narrated through the prism of the author's experience of losing both his parents, his mother when he was sixteen, his father when he was on the cusp of adulthood and of trying, after a breakdown some years later,Boldly combining the highly personal with the brilliantly scholarly, In the Dark Room explores the question of how memory works emotionally and culturally. It is narrated through the prism of the author's experience of losing both his parents, his mother when he was sixteen, his father when he was on the cusp of adulthood and of trying, after a breakdown some years later, to piece things together. Drawing on the lessons of centuries of literature, philosophy and visual art, Dillon interprets the relics of his parents and of his childhood in a singularly original and arresting piece of writing....

Title : In the Dark Room: A Journey in Memory
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781844880478
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

In the Dark Room: A Journey in Memory Reviews

  • Jennifer
    2018-09-25 21:52

    Fitzcarraldo Editions has just released this republishing of In the Dark Room that was first published in 2005. It is a passionate meditation on the memory and loss of the author's parents during his formative years, using a controlled framework of sections dealing with House, Things, Photographs, Bodies, Places, and Coda. Brian Dillon artfully weaves in the melancholic thoughts and writings of other great writers' such as Marcel Proust, St. Augustine, W.G. Sebald, and Walter Benjamin, as he seeks to understand how memory is formed and attaches itself to the external environment, and how these attachments generate emotional remembrances.Dillon discusses growing up with his two younger brothers with his parents, his mother passing away from a long, debilitating illness when he was 16, and shortly thereafter, losing his father at 23.

  • Tosh
    2018-09-16 01:39

    Amazing book on so many levels. On one level it's a book about memory so it has that distance from its subject matter which is death of his parents. But when he writes about his mom's illness as well as his dad's unexpected death it really hits home.This book serves many purposes. It's an excellent document on the nature of one's awareness of death and his it affects one but also the author has the intelligence to write about literature an how that ties in with ones personal ordeal, especially in family manners.No doubt this book is very personal but by no means a downer. What it is in a nutshell is a writer analyzing despair and turning it into gold for the reader.

  • sisterimapoet
    2018-10-03 23:41

    There were quite a lot of negative reviews about this but I'm glad I ignored them. I think the problem is that many people expect it to be a typical misery memoir - which I didn't want or expect - so therefore I wasn't disappointed. I loved the way Dillon talked us through the process of examining his parents lives - the close scrutiny to objects, photos, places and of course within each, memory. A fascinating process, ripe with lessons to learn for anyone seeking to explore their own memory more, as well as a moving insight into a single family.

  • Elie
    2018-10-02 21:00

    Dillon's exploration of memory is disappointingly restricted to an exploration of his memory, focused narrowly on the Dublin house of his childhood and on his parents' deaths. There is nothing original about the way Dillon approaches memory-as-photograph, nor are his musings on excerpts from other writers -- Bachelard and Proust, among others -- at all new or thought-provoking. I felt tricked into reading this rather poor memoir and almost wished I'd reread 'Angela's Ashes' instead.

  • Oisín
    2018-09-16 01:46

    Very good, though slightly bloodless and too much intellectualising at points. Overall quite moving.