Read Guarding the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy and Immigrants Since 1882 by Roger Daniels Online

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As renowned historian Roger Daniels shows in this brilliant new work, America's inconsistent, often illogical, and always cumbersome immigration policy has profoundly affected our recent past.The federal government's efforts to pick and choose among the multitude of immigrants seeking to enter the United States began with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Conceived in ignAs renowned historian Roger Daniels shows in this brilliant new work, America's inconsistent, often illogical, and always cumbersome immigration policy has profoundly affected our recent past.The federal government's efforts to pick and choose among the multitude of immigrants seeking to enter the United States began with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Conceived in ignorance and falsely presented to the public, it had undreamt of consequences, and this pattern has been rarely deviated from since.Immigration policy in Daniels' skilled hands shows Americans at their best and worst, from the nativist violence that forced Theodore Roosevelt's 1907 "gentlemen's agreement" with Japan to the generous refugee policies adopted after World War Two and throughout the Cold War. And in a conclusion drawn from today's headlines, Daniels makes clear how far ignorance, partisan politics, and unintended consequences have overtaken immigration policy during the current administration's War on Terror.Irreverent, deeply informed, and authoritative, Guarding the Golden Door presents an unforgettable interpretation of modern American history....

Title : Guarding the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy and Immigrants Since 1882
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780809053445
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Guarding the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy and Immigrants Since 1882 Reviews

  • Mark
    2019-04-10 09:25

    This well-organized history of immigration in America was an eye-opener for me as I strive to learn more about this issue.Essentially, it tells the story of our inverted bell shape curve on immigration -- heavy immigration numbers in the late 1800s and early 1900s as mostly male eastern and southern Europeans streamed into America to work in its factories, followed by severe immigration restrictions from the 1920s to the 1960s, and bookended by another huge surge in immigration with a very different set of characteristics, dominated by Mexicans, Central Americans, and Asians.Daniels is obviously pro-immigration, even though he never explicitly says so. It is clear in his focus on the injustice and racism of past immigration laws and regulations and his quick dismissal of most arguments about immigrants taking away jobs from native-born Americans or burdening the welfare system.A couple of factoids really stood out: 1) the dominant source of immigrants is family members, and they are NOT subject to the numerical country-based quotas that exist for other immigrants. That "chain effect" of migration is what has most changed the character and statistics of America today. A smaller but also non-quota groups that has helped reshape the landscape is refugees, particularly those from Southeast Asia, eastern Europe and parts of Africa. And for some reason, I was struck by the fact that Ronald Reagan presided over legislation that codified the practice of letting large numbers of Mexican and other Latino agricultural workers come into America without serious restrictions.The book ends around 2000, with a post-9/11 epilogue, so the last decade or so of immigration experience (and Congressional gridlock) is missing. Also, at times Daniels' writing is overly laden with statistics and minutiae, but all in all, this is an important and very fine introduction to U.S. immigration history.

  • Evan Clark
    2019-04-06 12:17

    Not a terrible book, nor extraordinary. A decent reference work, but not recommended for light reading.

  • Kate
    2019-04-18 11:27

    The federal government's efforts to pick and choose among the multitude of immigrants seeking to enter the United States began with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Conceived in ignorance and falsely presented to the public, it had undreamt of consequences, and this pattern has been rarely deviated from since. As renowned historian Roger Daniels shows in this brilliant new work, America's inconsistent, often illogical, and always cumbersome immigration policy has profoundly affected our recent past.Immigration policy in Daniels' skilled hands shows Americans at their best and worst, from the nativist violence that forced Theodore Roosevelt's 1907 "gentlemen's agreement" with Japan to the generous refugee policies adopted after World War Two and throughout the Cold War. And in a conclusion drawn from today's headlines, Daniels makes clear how far ignorance, partisan politics, and unintended consequences have overtaken immigration policy during the current administration's War on Terror.Irreverent, deeply informed, and authoritative, Guarding the Golden Door presents an unforgettable interpretation of modern American history.

  • Laura LeAnn
    2019-04-20 11:04

    An intense review of the history of immigration legislation in the United States. I read this book and then heard Daniels speak about it in a grad course. I agree with other reviews that the writing style can get a little dry at times, but having read an extreme amount of history books, this was by no means the worst. He provides a great deal of information showing the extensive research needed to write such a book. This is the book I recommend to others when having discussions of immigration policy in US history. It shows that immigration policy has not been one of open doors into the United States, but one of restriction, quotas, limitations, regulations, etc.

  • Brian
    2019-04-02 11:27

    The writing, especially in the first part, is a weave of facts and numbers. But don't let this deter you. Aside from serving as information, the numbers are also symbolic of the immigration policy--from quotas to the dizzying breakdowns of immigrant classification--that Daniels concisely describes. Sometimes Daniels' writing has him appear arrogant or all-knowing. But these examples are few. The absence of a discussion on Middle Eastern immigration left me disappointed. Overall, though, this is a good book to introduce its reader to the political history of U.S. immigration.

  • Jason
    2019-03-31 14:13

    Overall I gave the book two stars because although it had a great deal of good information and presented it in a fairly clear manner, the author's bias came through nearly every page. Since I came to the subject with little factual knowledge of the major immigration legislation, I can say that id did a good job of educating me in that regard. However, I am afraid his bias colored pretty much everything else.

  • Zane
    2019-04-16 12:27

    Lots of good information in this book. Not really impressed by Daniels' writing however; he's a historian and writes like one. The book got slow a few times and it seemed to just end without any real resolution. Still, the best overarching review of immigration history in the states I've come across.

  • Becca
    2019-04-04 11:30

    Most of what I know to be an educated yet emotional response about immigration into the US. Balanced, policy-centric, and intense. j

  • Natalia
    2019-04-14 14:03

    So much information from this book is taken from his other- 'Coming to America'- sometimes word-for-word.

  • Kel Luken
    2019-04-12 13:05

    Very liberal, but well written. Repeats many passages throughout the book. A scholarly read.