Read Boudicca: The Warrior Queen by M.J. Trow Online

boudicca-the-warrior-queen

'She was tall and terrible, with a great mass of red hair to her hips. She wore a twisted torc and a tunic of many colours ... She carried a spear to instil terror in all who saw her.' Dio Cassius In AD 61 Roman governor Suetonius Paullinus, a veteran of mountain warfare in Africa, led a crushing defeat by the 14th and 20th legions of Boudicca's revolt. The defeat of Boudi'She was tall and terrible, with a great mass of red hair to her hips. She wore a twisted torc and a tunic of many colours ... She carried a spear to instil terror in all who saw her.' Dio Cassius In AD 61 Roman governor Suetonius Paullinus, a veteran of mountain warfare in Africa, led a crushing defeat by the 14th and 20th legions of Boudicca's revolt. The defeat of Boudicca in effect made the Roman occupation of Britain possible - a victory would at the very least have seriously delayed it and possibly altered the whole course of the country's history. Among the British, women could inherit land, rule whole areas, lead armies. Boudicca did all three. And what made her revolt in AD 61 so terrifying was that she united other tribes under her and all but destroyed Rome's power base in the country. Boudicca herself left a twofold legacy. Surviving Paullinus' crushing defeat of her troops, she is traditionally alleged to have taken poison, along with her daughters. She had taken on the might of the greatest power of the ancient world and nearly driven it out of part of its empire; the Britons mourned her deeply and gave her a costly burial. Speeches attributed to her by the Romans on...

Title : Boudicca: The Warrior Queen
Author :
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ISBN : 9780750934008
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 250 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Boudicca: The Warrior Queen Reviews

  • Nikki
    2018-09-23 03:06

    I wasn't sure what to think of this at first, since it began with a reconstruction of the events of Boudicca's last battle which read like fiction. However, I appreciated that in the first chapter the author was very upfront about the sources used (and the lack of sources), and about the problem of tainted sources. The analysis of how accurate the information was helped me believe in Trow's good faith in doing this research. The reliance on racial stereotypes/archetypes made me wince a bit, because we do know so little about the Celts from their own point of view.I think Trow did well with the dearth of available information, and tried very hard to be fair to Boudicca: the book is very much on her side versus the Romans, without any suggestion of an alternative (could Boudicca have provoked the Romans?).It's an interesting read, and well written.

  • Pete daPixie
    2018-10-02 06:58

    M.J.Trow's 'Boudicca-The Warrior Queen' published 2003 is the second book that I have read by this author, having previously given four stars for his 'Cnut;Emperor of the North.'Mr Trow is a historian and a history teacher, well I only wish I had a history teacher of his perspicacity when I was a wee smaik.In similar vein to his Cnut, the author excavates every fragmentary layer of our present understanding of this Queen of the Iceni, a fossicker through the dark distant mists. Boudicca's place in Celtic-British legend is firmly established. The wronged woman who turns and strikes back at Nero's Rome to send shock waves back across the first century empire. In actual fact, it is not a case of what we know of this Celtic amazon, but what we still have no knowledge of. We do not know if she was a queen at all. Was she a druidess? We have no firm setting for the site of the final battle with Paulinus' XIV & XX legions. Archaeology has not discovered the Iceni power base in todays Norfolk, nor any royal internments. Also absent from any archaeological record is any confirmation to the writings of the classical Roman writers, namely Tacitus and Cassius Dio, in relation to the Romanised victims of the British rampage of 61a.d. at the three sites of devastation, namely Camulodunum (Colchester), Londinium or Verulamium (St.Albans).Yet, Mr Trow disembroils the propogandist classical texts, utilises what solid archaeological evidence we have and quotes the latest expertise on Roman Britain, to bring forth another shining nugget in his eminently readable style.

  • Heather
    2018-10-05 08:19

    I wish an alternate universe could have opened in Boudiccas' final battle against the Romans. How different would our British/North American planet be if she had won? The possibilities, for better or worse, are endless. It makes me want to read about more as the Celts as a people. Were they the Klingons they are often made out to be? Were women and men really on equal footing? Fascinating stuff.

  • Karen
    2018-09-26 06:16

    I think the authors know their stuff but they probably need a good editor to straighten out the chronology of their story. Also, the book needs photographs and many more maps showing the areas written about. There could be more background on the various Celtic tribes, too.

  • Angie
    2018-09-23 11:21

    It really should have been titled "How The Romans Attacked and Conquered Britain - Guest starring Boudicca". Plenty of historical information and analysis... But almost none of it was actually ON the alleged subject of the book.

  • Clare
    2018-10-06 11:23

    Not much about the womanLots of information about the Romans and ancient Britain, but hardly any content about Iacocca, which was really disappointing! Glad it was a free book.

  • Bryant
    2018-09-30 07:10

    Fascinating. I watched a history channel show on how she fought the Romans, but I needed to know more. Women and men on equal ground, both respected for their roles whatever they might be.

  • Crazy Cat
    2018-09-29 11:06

    Tangled with some names and places.

  • Liam Wallis
    2018-10-09 08:02

    i love it