Read The Spartan Regime: Its Character, Origins, and Grand Strategy by Paul Anthony Rahe Online

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An authoritative and refreshingly original consideration of the government and culture of ancient Sparta and her place in Greek history For centuries, ancient Sparta has been glorified in song, fiction, and popular art. Yet the true nature of a civilization described as a combination of democracy and oligarchy by Aristotle, considered an ideal of liberty in the ages of MacAn authoritative and refreshingly original consideration of the government and culture of ancient Sparta and her place in Greek history For centuries, ancient Sparta has been glorified in song, fiction, and popular art. Yet the true nature of a civilization described as a combination of democracy and oligarchy by Aristotle, considered an ideal of liberty in the ages of Machiavelli and Rousseau, and viewed as a forerunner of the modern totalitarian state by many twentieth-century scholars has long remained a mystery. In a bold new approach to historical study, noted historian Paul Rahe attempts to unravel the Spartan riddle by deploying the regime-oriented political science of the ancient Greeks, pioneered by Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Xenophon, and Polybius, in order to provide a more coherent picture of government, art, culture, and daily life in Lacedaemon than has previously appeared in print, and to explore the grand strategy the Spartans devised before the arrival of the Persians in the Aegean....

Title : The Spartan Regime: Its Character, Origins, and Grand Strategy
Author :
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ISBN : 9780300219012
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 232 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Spartan Regime: Its Character, Origins, and Grand Strategy Reviews

  • Richard
    2019-05-08 22:24

    Dr Rahe is obviously a brilliant man and knows Sparta and that part of the world and time up and down, inside and out. This academic work is not for the casual reader. If you aren't pretty familiar with Greece -- particularly place names and geography -- and its ancient history, be prepared for a long slog through a rather short book. Short in terms of pages. Anything but short on content.If you as a reader want to work at it, you will learn A LOT about Sparta. I did finish the book, even through the author's note. If I had to take a test on what I read, I'd do well to earn a gentleman's "C".I am intentionally not assigning a "star" rating. My personal rating would be 2 stars, simply because this book is not for me. As a work of academic literature, it deserves at least 4 stars, probably 5. My compromise is to leave the rating field blank.

  • Paul Skelding
    2019-04-27 14:06

    This is a mid-length comprehensive book about Sparta, it's citizens and government. I enjoyed the first half of the book though a bit dry. The second half which delves into the government system in detail and the various conflicts throughout Sparta's history was more dry and sometimes meanders with extraneous tangents. Overall a worthwhile book to read for serious fans of Sparta, historical militaries or military societies.

  • John Warren
    2019-05-19 15:29

    very informative but very short

  • Margaret Sankey
    2019-05-27 20:09

    Surprisingly from the chair of "Western Heritage" at Hillsdale, this is an examination of Spartan Grand Strategy--not as a good unto itself, but as a product of their status as precariously perched interlopers in their territory, isolated and ruling over a huge class of land slaves. Pushed by both the military hoplite revolutions of the 7th century, and the helot revolts in their wake, the Spartans developed their politics and society in ways that more cosmopolitan and outward looking Athens didn't need to do. Rahe has written this as a set up to why, upon interaction with the Persians, this came under significant strain, and ultimately disastrous conflict in the Peloponnesian War.