Read Insomnia: Poems by Linda Pastan Online

insomnia-poems

These poems chart the journeys of sleepless nights when whole lifetimes seem to pass with their stories: loves lost and gained; children and seasons in their phases; and the world beyond, both threatening and enriching life. The time before sleep acts as an invitation to reflect on the world's quieter movements—from gardens heavy after a first storm to the moon slipping inThese poems chart the journeys of sleepless nights when whole lifetimes seem to pass with their stories: loves lost and gained; children and seasons in their phases; and the world beyond, both threatening and enriching life. The time before sleep acts as an invitation to reflect on the world's quieter movements—from gardens heavy after a first storm to the moon slipping into darkness in an eclipse—as well as on the subtle but relentless passage of time. Insomnia embodies Linda Pastan's graceful and iconic voice, both lucid and haunting....

Title : Insomnia: Poems
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393353754
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 96 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Insomnia: Poems Reviews

  • Rebecca Foster
    2019-04-27 16:40

    Linda Pastan has been writing poetry for nearly half a century, so I feel sheepish admitting I’d never heard of her before I requested this book at random. I’m so glad I did, though: these are excellent free verse poems, infused with images of weather, heavenly bodies, the night sky, art history, and travels. No rhymes to speak of, but plenty of alliteration and repetition – like in “Necklace,” where nearly every line ends with “pearl” or “pearls.” Historical and mythological references are frequent and highbrow. Especially in Part 3, the main theme is facing old age and illness; one of my favorites in the whole collection is “MRI”:Strapped down on my backin a sci-fi spacecraft,I wait, like an astronaut,for liftoff. The mission:to find the insidious cometor meteor about to ruin my hapless body.Assaulted nowby sound (cymbals, cannons),rat-tat-tat of firearms) and lostin magnetic fields, I longnot for health but for simple quiet:the storied silence of outer space.The final three poems are a perfect guide to approaching death with dignity. I’ll be sure to seek out more collections from Pastan.

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    2019-05-19 13:56

    (I received a copy of this from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.)I previously read two books of poetry by Linda Pastan. This volume reflects a life lived, with some poems about friends who have passed, the other side of cancer, the end of relationships, and more nature poems than I remember her having previously. (I suspect I need to find more poetry from poets in their 30s to feel a bit more of a shared experience, but this is not her fault of course.)"The point is to follow the winding pathof words wherever it wants to take you, stepby step, ignoring the boulders, the barbed wire fences, the rutted ditches choked with ragweed." (from "Remembering Stafford on His Centennial")

  • Naomi
    2019-05-05 13:52

    Read these aloud and slip into the spaces the words open for wonder and reflection and murmuring "yes" and "amen". Themes: aging, dying, life, love.

  • Trina Marie
    2019-05-01 10:05

    Many of these poems made me a lil teary and warm. unexpectedly wonderful. Just one of my favorites: ExerciseTwo people come out of a building --not out of a bar, not a priest and rabbi. Out of a church, perhaps, after a wedding, the steeple white and bridal, or out of a bank with stolen money spillingin green confetti from their pockets, a youngish man and woman in homemade masks, or from a house on fire, stories behind themblazing; stories growing like wildfirein the forest of prose. But when two people leave a building in a poemthe building could be the body and the two: flesh and spirit; or it couldbe the universe itself, Earthand its moon spinning from the galaxy. I'll take prose. I'll put myself to sleepwith stories as real as a mother and father lying in the next room dreaming, as they prepareto leave the building of my life.

  • Haines Eason
    2019-05-22 12:48

    A collection that grabs the attention quickly with its early poems, particularly the second poem, "Cosmology," with its ghostly remembrances. The second section is too domestic and removed from the book's trajectory--this book is a mediation on what it means to await a great departure, say from life and other pursuits. The third section carries with it some of part two's domesticity, but by the end he poems have the force of the initial poems.

  • Jsavett1
    2019-05-10 09:38

    Pastan is one of my favorite poets and her newest book is good. It's not five star great like some of her early work or Traveling Light, but I've found that few of my favorite poets' late work is of great depth or worth. This is not true of Pastan, and there are some really wonderful poems to cherish in here that I'll come back to again. Specifically, see "Ship's Clock," "Consider The Space Between Stars," "Imaginary Conversation," and "Love Poem Again." There's nothing "new" here in terms of the themes and techniques Pastan explores and uses, but there's plenty to love about her always wonderful eye, her precision, and the intense quiet of her poems. Thank you, Linda.

  • Jacqueline
    2019-05-10 14:42

    With her poetry, Linda Pastan lifts the mundane details of life into moments of epiphany. "You grind the coffee with the small roar of a mind trying to clear itself"She connects travel experiences to emotional undercurrents of aging. The view of Vesuvio from a hotel room in Pompeii is "a peaceful-looking dragon/holding its fiery breath, biding its time." Many of the poems are about aging and coming to terms with mortality. This is a beautiful collection, like all of Linda Pastan's work.

  • Jeanne
    2019-05-11 14:56

    I love Linda Pastan and her latest collection did not dissapoint.

  • Rochelle Ballard
    2019-05-05 12:38

    I love the first line of this collection of poems: "Sleep has stepped out for a smoke and may not be back."

  • ThePhoenix93
    2019-05-23 16:05

    This is beautifully written. I especially loved the first part of the collection, the poems about/featuring nature were by far my favorites, such strong imagery and carefully chosen words. There were a few poems I didn't quite connect to, particulatly in the middle part, and that's why I'm torn between a 3.5 and a solid 4-star rating, but all the poems were masterfully crafted, so I really couldn't bring myself to give a lower rating.

  • Sarah
    2019-05-20 11:07

    The opening poem, “Insomnia: 3 AM,” is a gem, as is much of the first section. There are a couple of strong poems in the other two sections, but I least enjoyed the late-second, early-third because of the poems about writing. I don’t want to think about the writer in the act. It takes the intimacy out of it for me. But Pastan’s adventurous spirit and honesty makes it a worthwhile read, I think—I’ll be using “Insomnia” to teach myself how to write in the style of Pastan!

  • Alyssa (redheadreads)
    2019-05-15 13:00

    There were a few rocky areas of this collection of poetry, but overall I really enjoyed the tone and many of the pieces. Not a new favorite, but still a sweet and tender book of poetry.

  • James
    2019-05-20 11:03

    A collection of poems focusing on sleepless nights and the thoughts that trouble us during those times, i.e., the passage of time, the value of our efforts, the fear of disease and death. Pastan is open and honest with these emotions and readers will find a lot to relate to from this experienced poet.

  • Tom Romig
    2019-05-14 13:52

    Honest, original, well crafted poems. This collection is a brave and thoughtful meditation on life's last stage, on the inevitable arc of existence. The mystery here is how I could have gone so long without reading Linda Pastan. (Thanks to the Library of Congress Weekly Digest Bulletin, which not only informs about happenings at LC but includes several poems. Great way to find out about many fine poets.)