Read Handbook of the History of Logic, Volume 1: Greek, Indian and Arabic logic by Dov M. Gabbay Online

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Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Godel, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth CenturGreek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Godel, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth Century, and The Many-Valued and Non-Monotonic Turn in Logic. Further volumes will follow, including Mediaeval and Renaissance Logic and Logic: A History of its Central. In designing the Handbook of the History of Logic, the Editors have taken the view that the history of logic holds more than an antiquarian interest, and that a knowledge of logic's rich and sophisticated development is, in various respects, relevant to the research programmes of the present day. Ancient logic is no exception. The present volume attests to the distant origins of some of modern logic's most important features, such as can be found in the claim by the authors of the chapter on Aristotle's early logic that, from its infancy, the theory of the syllogism is an example of an intuitionistic, non-monotonic, relevantly paraconsistent logic. Similarly, in addition to its comparative earliness, what is striking about the best of the Megarian and Stoic traditions is their sophistication and originality. Logic is an indispensably important pivot of the Western intellectual tradition. But, as the chapters on Indian and Arabic logic make clear, logic's parentage extends more widely than any direct line from the Greek city states. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that for centuries logic has been an unfetteredly international enterprise, whose research programmes reach to every corner of the learned world. Like its companion volumes, Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic is the result of a design that gives to its distinguished authors as much space as would be needed to produce highly authoritative chapters, rich in detail and interpretative reach. The aim of the Editors is to have placed before the relevant intellectual communities a research tool of indispensable value. Together with the other volumes, Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic, will be essential reading for everyone with a curiosity about logic's long development, especially researchers, graduate and senior undergraduate students in logic in all its forms, argumentation theory, AI and computer science, cognitive psychology and neuroscience, linguistics, forensics, philosophy and the history of philosophy, and the history of ideas."...

Title : Handbook of the History of Logic, Volume 1: Greek, Indian and Arabic logic
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ISBN : 9780444504661
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 632 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Handbook of the History of Logic, Volume 1: Greek, Indian and Arabic logic Reviews

  • Dmk
    2018-10-01 19:24

    It's hard to judge book like this one. It containes seven chapters from seven authors, five of them could be considered standalone book. Seven different topics, seven diffrent writing styles, aproaches to theme. You must me prepared for changes in writing and you must be prepared tht you probably won't fall into target group of this book (honestly I still don't know what this target group). Sometimes authors just jumps into theme with no introduction, sometimes you're just reading and asking yourself where it's reading. 1 Logic before aristotle: amazing, interesting, short and well-written with good intelligible structure.2 -3 Aristotle: I have no idea why this chapters where written separately. There are good and interesting things here, but it feels too long and sometimes it's boring. 4 More Aristotle: Too hard for me to follow, bunch of symbols in semi-polish notation.5 Indian Logic: It feels like author is taking just random pieces from works of indian philosophers and talks about them, but man the're so interesting, pleasure to read, truly exotic philosophy but author greatly formalised it in western shell and makes it even more profound. Graph-theory as ontological device, 7-value logic as tool for dealing in incoherence between different topics of our though and more6 Stoics logic: this is the answer on qeustion: why everybody denies that there was post-aristotelian logic in greece althrough stoics have written so much of it. Author bravely tries to explain this mess called Stoic Logic to reader and mostly it's done well altough sometimes it's little bit confusing. I highly apreciate parts dealing with stoics conditionals.7 Too much of history, too little of logic, it's just hundred pages about how muslims were cyclingly modifing aristotle's logic and that returning to his original system. Interesting things to know but little too long for only-becouse-of-curiosty readers.And for all chapters I apreaciate discussion on relationship between those people and logic. But I dislike that they totaly omitt Chinese mohists. I know there's not much to be said about their logic but totally omitting it seems kinda unfair and it makes you feel like something is missing in book.