Read Higher, Steeper, Faster: The Daredevils Who Conquered the Skies by Lawrence Goldstone Online

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Discover the daring aviation pioneers who made the dream of powered flight a reality, forever changing the course of history.Aviator Lincoln Beachey broke countless records: he looped-the-loop, flew upside down and in corkscrews, and was the first to pull his aircraft out of what was a typically fatal tailspin. As Beachey and other aviators took to the skies in death-defyiDiscover the daring aviation pioneers who made the dream of powered flight a reality, forever changing the course of history.Aviator Lincoln Beachey broke countless records: he looped-the-loop, flew upside down and in corkscrews, and was the first to pull his aircraft out of what was a typically fatal tailspin. As Beachey and other aviators took to the skies in death-defying acts in the early twentieth century, these innovative daredevils not only wowed crowds, but also redefined the frontiers of powered flight.Higher, Steeper, Faster takes readers inside the world of the brave men and women who popularized flying through their deadly stunts and paved the way for modern aviation....

Title : Higher, Steeper, Faster: The Daredevils Who Conquered the Skies
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781478915416
Format Type : Audiobook
Number of Pages : 203 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Higher, Steeper, Faster: The Daredevils Who Conquered the Skies Reviews

  • Andrew
    2018-10-13 16:48

    This book is brief look into the perils of aviation. When aviation first started, many planes crashed and aviators lost their life. Pilots pushed the boundaries against speed, height and low altitude flying. Many of the pilots discussed here were fearless and helped move the needle in aviation. The book is well written and the pace flows quickly. People without a science or engineering will still enjoy this book. The technical terms are well explained and suitable for juvenile reading.

  • Emma
    2018-09-28 22:35

    Incredibly inspiring. These people did not give up at the first sign of failure.

  • Joy Lane
    2018-10-14 15:54

    it looks interesting...I really didn't read it, but wanted to note that it has a Lexile score of 1,150. as of Dec, 2017 there is no test.

  • Jill Berry
    2018-10-01 15:47

    Excellent nonfiction weaving information about the pioneers of aviation into a fascinating story.

  • Anne
    2018-10-13 17:30

    A useful tool to place a story on the pages about the personalities involved in actually flying the early flying machines and airplanes.

  • Suzanne
    2018-09-26 17:51

    I picked up an ARC of this title at the ALA Midwinter meeting and carried it around with me all weekend, reading it in between sessions. Our school participates in the Civil Air Patrol's A.C.E. program, so I am always on the lookout for good books about aerospace and aviation. The cover caught my eye and once I began reading it, I was drawn in by the descriptions of the risks those early aviators took to set records and try out new improvements to the technology. Some of the names are familiar to most of use - the Wright brothers, Bleriot, perhaps the Montgolfiers. But most of the flyers, who were household names in their day, are unknown now. Hearing about the fierce competition to set altitude and speed records, or to be the first to perform a loop or roll, it is hard to imagine the courage it took to fly in an open cockpit with no safety gear and attempt these incredible feats.The chronological narrative helps readers to understand the developments and advances that aviation was undergoing, while also detailing the triumphs and tragedies that happened along the way. Archival photos, advertisements, posters, ticket stubs and other ephemera document bring the words on the page to life in our imaginations. The helpful back matter, including a timeline, glossary, and bibliography, will help with understanding and will lead the curious to new sources of information.A well-written and captivating look at a time in history that captured the imagination and admiration of the world and still enthralls us today. Recommended for ages 8+.

  • Jenn Lopez
    2018-10-01 23:36

    Early aviation meant lots of plane crashes and grizzly deaths. Read this ARC to discover bodies smashed by motors, women pilots thrown from the plane and horribly crushed , aviators who survived a crash, only to drown. The pilots raced against trains, cars and other planes. They were brave, they were crazy...and it's all in this book! Our teen book group received this as a review galley from Little, Brown & Co. I thought I would read it to book talk it and get the teens excited about reading a non-fiction book. It is really well written, and full of interesting, details about the early men and women of flight, their death defying tricks, and sometimes their gory deaths. The discoveries are amazing, and their stories even more so. I don't think I will have any trouble getting some teens to read this and review it. I wasn't interested in aviation, and I found this fascinating!

  • David
    2018-10-11 17:44

    This book made me smile; I loved reading about the odd attempts at flying and the feats various dare devils performed. It was difficult having an un-bias view of this book since I was in the Air Force; but I truly believe this book would entertain and teach young minds about the miracle of flight and those that contributed to the development of the first airplanes. Many people lost their lives both in the development and also in entertaining the thousands of people that came to the fairs and meets. Throughout the book there are interesting, black and white photographs of the famous people involved in airplane development as well as their flying machines. In the back of the book are a glossary and timeline of noteworthy, aeronautical events.

  • Stephen
    2018-10-10 17:37

    Brief and succinct snippets of aviators during the dawn of flight. Lots of death and injury for these brave and crazy early fliers. Though I don't know if I hold them in as high regard as the author, as he credits them for advancing much of aviation, it seemed they were very reckless in rushing towards untested limits seemingly mostly for fame and fortune. Surely we would still have advanced flight today if they could have taken a little longer to iron out the bugs in their machines. Story after story in the book seems to be of them rushing to push forward with hobbled together gear to meet some contest or exhibition deadline and so that a foreign flyer would not supersede them in reaching new height records or other measurement for danger. In the end I agree with Woodrow Wilson's assessment that it seems a bit too reckless.

  • PWRL
    2018-09-27 23:42

    E

  • Raina
    2018-10-02 17:43

    Dibs for TRL SRP. :)