Read Dr. Z: The Lost Memoirs of an Irreverent Football Writer by Paul Zimmerman Peter King Online

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During his nearly 50 years of sportswriting, including 28 at Sports Illustrated, readers of Dr. Z came to expect a certain alchemical, trademark blend: words which were caustic and wry, at times self-deprecating or even puzzling, but always devilishly smart with arresting honesty. A complex package, that's the Doctor.   The one-time sparring partner of Ernest Hemingway, PaDuring his nearly 50 years of sportswriting, including 28 at Sports Illustrated, readers of Dr. Z came to expect a certain alchemical, trademark blend: words which were caustic and wry, at times self-deprecating or even puzzling, but always devilishly smart with arresting honesty. A complex package, that's the Doctor.   The one-time sparring partner of Ernest Hemingway, Paul Zimmerman is one of the modern era's groundbreaking football minds, a man who methodically charted every play while generating copious notes, a human precursor to the data analytics websites of today. In 2008, Zimmerman had nearly completed work on his personal memoirs when a series of strokes left him largely unable to speak, read, or write. Compiled and edited by longtime SI colleague Peter King, these are the stories he still wants to see told.   Dr. Z’s memoir is a rich package of personalities, stories never shared about such characters as Vince Lombardi, Walter Payton, Lawrence Taylor, and Johnny Unitas. Even Joe Namath, with whom Zimmerman had a legendary and well-documented 23-year feud, saw fit to eventually unburden himself to the remarkable scribe.   Also included are Zimmerman's encounters with luminaries and larger-than-life figures outside of sports, notably Donald Trump, Rupert Murdoch, and Hunter S. Thompson. But not to be missed are Zimmerman's quieter observations on his own life and writing, witticisms and anecdotes which sway between the poignant and hilarious. No matter the topic, Dr. Z: the Lost Memoirs of an Irreverent Football Writer proves essential, compelling reading for sports fans old and new....

Title : Dr. Z: The Lost Memoirs of an Irreverent Football Writer
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781629374642
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Dr. Z: The Lost Memoirs of an Irreverent Football Writer Reviews

  • Doug Allan
    2018-10-06 09:08

    I expected i to be funnier- had no idea he covered the Olympics-72,76,80. best part of the book

  • Terry Enright
    2018-10-13 09:08

    To sort of paraphrase Forest Gump, "This book is like a box of chocolates". Each chapter different from the others, yet still full of tasty goodness. Some places in the book may not be easy for the younger non Football historian. But that is more than made up for with little gems spread throughout the book that will make you laugh out loud, or just say "Holy crap"! I mean not many books go from Hemmingway t0 Montana to John Kiley (ex Red Sox Organist). As a Sports fan of a certain age I can tell you that it's a fun read.

  • Anthony Nelson
    2018-10-06 15:13

    For those who may remember Dr. Z's incisive and witty Sports Illustrated columns, ended by a stroke in 2008, this autobiography is a welcome reunion with an old friend. Zimmerman is full of fantastic stories about the early days of his sportswriting career, including boxing with Earnest Hemingway and drinking with Hunter S. Thompson, and journalism nerds will enjoy. Unfortunately, Zimmerman had his stroke before he was able to complete writing the book, so it is isn't a complete narrative, and there is a lot of filler made up of his old SI columns. Still, Zimmerman's voice comes through strong and clear.

  • Gavin
    2018-09-26 09:13

    It's too bad that Dr. Z wasn't able to finish the book himself and it had to be padded out with old Sports Illustrated articles, but it was still wonderful to read.The cantankerous old sports writer actually paid attention to what took place on the field instead of storylines and human interest stories. He noticed the fine details of why plays or strategies succeeded or failed. He had a fantastic grasp of the history of the sport. The writing was always delivered with both genuine interest and wry wit.The book covers his career as a writer and sportwriter, as well as his life in general. It jumps around from topic to topic, but stays interesting throughout. I'm disappointed I won't be able to read anything new from him again.

  • Clifford Gans
    2018-10-13 09:07

    Liked the parts about Dr. Z's time working for my hometown newspaper, The Sacramento Bee, early in his career. Made me think of some of its other great old writers, Bill Conlin, Joe Hamelin, S.L. Price, and Pete Dexter. The essay on collecting also struck home, since I'm charmed/cursed with the gene too. It's a tribute to his family and friends that they were able to complete this memoir. I'm just truly sorry that the good Dr. could not complete it himself, but he should be immensely proud of their efforts.

  • Eliza Dooley
    2018-09-24 09:33

    Memoirs in the Style of Hemingway and Joan Didion. Fascinating reflections on the politics of the Olympics over many years. Funny and poignant reflections on dating after divorce, the battle of wine tasting, keeping statistics about weird things. Not just a great gift for those who like football. A great read.

  • John
    2018-10-16 14:30

    I am so glad I took Peter King's recommendation and read this. I remember reading Dr. Z as a kid when I subscribed to SI. What I was most impressed with here was the non-football content especially his great writings on the Olympics. A great voice and even better person silenced too soon. Thank you Peter for being a great friend to him and getting this published.

  • Ron
    2018-10-14 08:03

    It was definitely a hodgepog of the author's life, spanning both his personal life (collections) to his professional career covering sports. He was obviously a wealth of knowledge for early football; but, I most enjoyed the sections on the various Olympics (Mexico, Munich, and Moscow) that he covered. Incredible, on the ground, perspective!!!

  • Dave Uyematsu
    2018-09-26 14:26

    If you are into the history of pro football, I highly recommend this book. He talks about Johnny Unitas, Roger Staubach, and Joe Montana. He also discusses sparring with Ernest Hemingway. Enjoyable read.

  • Roy D. Goldstein
    2018-09-17 09:30

    Good ReadThe football sections of the book were superb. The wine tasting and collectibles portions less so. But a fun read, overall.

  • Chris Wesseling
    2018-10-03 14:27

    Paul Zimmerman is a legend, the first football writer to make film review and analytics a regular feature in his work. As evidenced by his earlier books such as A Thinking Man’s Guide to Football or The Last Season of Weeb Ewbank, his experience, connections and comprehensive grasp of football strategy allowed him to put star players, iconic coaches, pro football trends and even game plans into historical perspective. It’s a shame those qualities are overshadowed here by a writing style that can’t hide the self-important prig between the covers. The last half of this ‘memoir’ is dominated by a relentlessly prickly personality that would send me fleeing toward the closest exit before the pedantic bitterness chokes the life out of the room.

  • John Deardurff
    2018-10-04 10:09

    As a sports fan of a certain age, I remember fondly reading the doctor's interesting and detail take on the week of football and other life's mysteries. This auto-biography is bittersweet in that it allows me to hear a voice from my youth, only to be reminded that that voice has now been muted. One definitely needs to be familiar with the style of writing often found in Mr. Zimmerman's articles, but be aware that this is not a sports book, but a book on the life of a writer.