Read No Quick Fix: Where Higher Life Theology Came From, What It Is, and Why It's Harmful by Andrew David Naselli Online

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Every Christian struggles with sin and wants to be victorious in the fight.Higher life theology--also known as Keswick theology--offers a quick fix for this struggle. It teaches that there are two categories of Christians: those who are merely saved, and those who have really surrendered to Christ. Those who have Jesus as their Savior alone, and those who have him as theirEvery Christian struggles with sin and wants to be victorious in the fight.Higher life theology--also known as Keswick theology--offers a quick fix for this struggle. It teaches that there are two categories of Christians: those who are merely saved, and those who have really surrendered to Christ. Those who have Jesus as their Savior alone, and those who have him as their Master as well. If Christians can simply "let go and let God" they can be free of struggling with sin and brought to that higher level of spiritual life. What could be wrong with that?A lot, it turns out. In No Quick Fix, a shorter and more accessible version of his book Let Go and Let God?, Andy Naselli critiques higher life theology from a biblical perspective. He shows that it leads not to freedom, but to frustration, because it promises something it has no power to deliver. Along the way, he tells the story of where higher life theology came from, describes its characteristics, and compares it to what the Bible really says about how we overcome sin and become more like Christ....

Title : No Quick Fix: Where Higher Life Theology Came From, What It Is, and Why It's Harmful
Author :
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ISBN : 9781683590460
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 582 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

No Quick Fix: Where Higher Life Theology Came From, What It Is, and Why It's Harmful Reviews

  • Barry
    2019-03-13 01:39

    Higher Life theology (Keswick theology) proposes that sometime after a person becomes a Christian and is justified, they should seek a second experience (“second filling” or “filling of the Spirit”) and thereby become sanctified (and “Spirit-filled’). This idea has become increasingly pervasive since the mid 19th century, often using the slogan, “Let go, and let God.” Naselli concisely but thoroughly debunks this view of sanctification, showing the errors that result:1. It creates two categories of Christian (“carnal” and “spiritual”)2. It portrays a shallow and incomplete view of sin in the Christian life3. It emphasizes passivity, not activity4. It portrays the Christian’s free will as autonomously starting and stopping sanctification5. It does not interpret and apply the Bible accurately6. It assures spurious “Christians” they are saved7. It uses superficial formulas for instantaneous sanctification8. It fosters dependency on experience at special holiness meetings9. It frustrates and disillusions the have-nots10. It misinterprets personal experiencesNaselli (and John MacArthur in the afterword) insists that “there is only one kind of Christian: a person who has been justified and is being sanctified.” Sanctification is a lifelong process that begins at justification.

  • Michael Stilley
    2019-03-01 03:34

    Excellent little book exposing the dangers of Keswick theology.

  • Andrew Mulnix
    2019-03-07 03:35

    Good, concise. Makes me want to read the more academic version. Wish it (Let Go and Let God?) was available in print instead of a logos exclusive.

  • Spencer R
    2019-02-25 05:36

    The full review can be found o my blog, Spoiled Milks, on January 2, 2018.No Quick Fix is an abridged version of Andrew Naselli’s book Let Go and Let God? A Survey and Analysis of Keswick Theology (revised from his PhD dissertation). The academic language has been stripped down, and the book has been repackaged for thoughtful lay people.Higher life theology (coming from the early days of the Keswick [pronounced KEH-zick] theology, though distinguished from the Keswick Convention today) promotes a quick fix to the Christian life. Rather than growing in one’s sanctification and walk with God, Higher life theology says that you can be with out (intentional) sin now if you would only consecrate your life to Jesus. He may be your Savior, but he needs to be your Lord.SummaryNaselli divides his book into two parts, two chapters per section. Part one explains the story and history of higher life theology (ch. 1) and what this theology teaches (ch. 2). In part two, Naselli looks at the fundamental reason why higher life theology is harmful (ch. 3) and follows up with nine more reasons why this theology is harmful for the Christian life (ch. 4). Naselli wants to help those who have taught or have been taught higher life theology to know what the Bible teaches about the Christian life, and he wants to expose higher life theology to those who have no experience with it so they can better minister to those who have been influenced by it.In higher life theology, there are three kinds of people in the world: 1. natural (unconverted) 2. carnal (converted but characterized by an unconverted lifestyle) 3. spiritual (converted and Spirit-filled)Unfortunately, a Christian who consecrates his life to Christ, received the filling of the Spirit, and is relinquished from a life of sin can still choose to unconsecrate his life. This is strange considering what Naselli says later, that “after you ‘let go and let God,’ God is obligated to keep you from sin’s power” (40). When the Christian is loosed from sin how would he be able to intentionally choose to not be under the Lordship of his Savior and, thus, sin? And why would he want to?). Doing so stops the sanctification process and will lead to the believer needing to consecrate his life to God again.The biggest reason why higher life theology is harmful for Christians is its division of Christians into “carnal” and “spiritual” categories. Carnal Christians have the Spirit, but spiritual Christians are filled by the Spirit. Again, Naselli is not on a witch hunt. He presents five commendable characteristics of higher life theology: It exalts Christ, it is warmly devotional, it emphasizes spiritual disciplines, it affirms fundamental orthodoxy, and it has a legacy of faithful Christian leaders.However, Naselli spends the second part of his book explaining higher life’s theology defects. He lists ten reasons, a few of these being that higher life theology emphasizes passivity, not activity, as God is 100% the one who keeps us from sin. There is truth to this, but it severely downplays our role in fighting against sin. It also misinterprets personal experiences. Sometimes a Christian may have a spiritual experience of some kind, a great sense of God’s overwhelming presence. Just as one remembers Christmas dinner more than Tuesdays leftovers, these experiences leave a lasting impression on our lives. Yet that doesn’t mean that we have received a second filling or are now free from sin. No Quick Fix ends with a lengthy and solid afterword by John MacArthur and an appendix with a list of twenty-eight resources on the Christian life.Recommended?With numerous charts throughout Naselli’s book which helpfully portray the beliefs of both higher life theology and what the Bible teaches, Naselli’s book is short enough to get a hold on what higher life theology is and why one shouldn’t hold to it. Higher life theology is pervasive, but the Bible shows us a better way: walking and growing with the God who saved us, redeemed us, walks with us, and promises to return for us. This God can be understood and known (Jer 9.24), and he is fighting for us and with us. This is a book I wish I would have had in high school. I heard it occasionally in school, in church, and a bit in Bible college too. Knowing what higher life theology is and how to reason against it biblically will save you and others a lot of worry over having to “consecrate” themselves all over again… again. 

  • Peggy Johnson
    2019-03-03 09:35

    I like being challenged to think deeply upon my theology. This read convicted me to be discerning. I loved his deep treatment of several large chunks of scripture, especially John 15 and the topic of abiding.