Read Parades and the Politics of the Street: Festive Culture in the Early American Republic by Simon P. Newman Online

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Simon P. Newman vividly evokes the celebrations of America's first national holidays in the years between the ratification of the Constitution and the inauguration of Thomas Jefferson. He demonstrates how, by taking part in the festive culture of the streets, ordinary American men and women were able to play a significant role in forging the political culture of the youngSimon P. Newman vividly evokes the celebrations of America's first national holidays in the years between the ratification of the Constitution and the inauguration of Thomas Jefferson. He demonstrates how, by taking part in the festive culture of the streets, ordinary American men and women were able to play a significant role in forging the political culture of the young nation. The creation of many of the patriotic holidays we still celebrate coincide with the emergence of the first two-party system. With the political songs they sang, the liberty poles they raised, and the partisan badges they wore, Americans of many walks of life helped shape a new national politics destined to replace the regional practices of the colonial era....

Title : Parades and the Politics of the Street: Festive Culture in the Early American Republic
Author :
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ISBN : 9780812217247
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Parades and the Politics of the Street: Festive Culture in the Early American Republic Reviews

  • Luxa
    2018-11-05 18:12

    This book was interesting, and definitely told a lot about various symbols and rites of the early American republic. However, to anyone who has a knowledge of this period of American history (approx. 1790-1800), many of the points the author makes won't be a surprise; the concept of the battle between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans taking place in the streets is just an extension of regular American history, regardless of how much the author focuses on marginalized groups. And he does! The way the author constantly refers back to how women and black Americans participated in the aspect of popular political culture he is talking about.Ultimately, though, the biggest flaw of this book is repetition. When I began it, it was far more interesting to me than it was by the end, because the author is seemingly unaware that he has spent the last two hundred pages repeating the same three or four sentiments; the French Revolution was integral to the development of Democratic-Republicans, the Federalists slowly lost control over the festivals, and the Democratic-Republicans used liberty poles, trees, caps, and the tricolor as symbols. Now rinse and repeat.An interesting book that did provide some light on aspects of American life, but was killed by its own word count.