Read The Suffering of God According to Martin Luther's 'Theologia Crucis' by Dennis Ngien Jürgen Moltmann Online

the-suffering-of-god-according-to-martin-luther-s-theologia-crucis

Does God suffer within himself? Does God suffer only in the humanity of Jesus Christ? Or does only the God-man Jesus Christ suffer? This book seeks to demonstrate that the suffering of God has an "ontological status" in Luther's Theologia Crucis. The discussion concentrates on three constituents of Luther's theology - Christology, soteriology, and Trinity - to see how eachDoes God suffer within himself? Does God suffer only in the humanity of Jesus Christ? Or does only the God-man Jesus Christ suffer? This book seeks to demonstrate that the suffering of God has an "ontological status" in Luther's Theologia Crucis. The discussion concentrates on three constituents of Luther's theology - Christology, soteriology, and Trinity - to see how each of them establishes the assertion that God suffers. It also places Luther within the modern discussions of Essential Apathy: Luther accepts the Old Church's Theopaschitism, but rejects Patripassianism, a heresy of the Old Church. This study breaks new ground by taking Luther a step further, arguing that only a Trinitarian theology of the cross is genuine Christian theology, and that the suffering of Christ touches the immanent Trinity as well as the economic Trinity. Ngien engages in useful discussions with other scholars including Paul Althaus, Walter von Loewenich, Ian Siggins, Marc Lienhard, Eberhard Jungel, Jurgen Moltmann, and Alister McGrath. "Dr. Ngien has done a good job of sorting out Luther's numerous statements about the suffering of God and finding consistency in them. He engages in a useful discussion with other Lutheran commentators. He presents a concise and competent survey of the early church's discussion of the suffering of God and also attends to Luther's reception of and reaction to late medieval thought." - David E. Demson, University of Toronto Dennis Ngien (PhD) is Research Professor of Theology at Tyndale University College and Seminary, Toronto. He is founder of the Centre for Mentorship and Theological Reflection, and author of Apologetic for Filioque in Medieval Theology (Paternoster Press, 2005) as well as numerous journal articles."...

Title : The Suffering of God According to Martin Luther's 'Theologia Crucis'
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781573833691
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Suffering of God According to Martin Luther's 'Theologia Crucis' Reviews

  • Jay Winters
    2019-01-01 07:30

    Book Closing: When I have to tell people what makes Lutheran theology distinctive, I usually start with some form of an explanation of Luther's "Theology of the Cross" from the Hiedelberg Disputation. That may make me a theological nerd, but at least I'm a nerd that agrees with Dennis Ngien's dissertation here.The Suffering of God is a dissertation-turned-book, which means that it's not light reading, but that it does drive deep into the marrow of the topic. The topic itself is how the theology of the cross really drives the theological subtopics of things like soteriology (theology of salvation), Trinity, and Christology (theology of the Messiah). Ngien does this in an interesting way for books on the theology of the cross in that he doesn't spend much time explaining the anthropology of the theology of the cross (in other words, how the theology of the cross is seen in humans), but rather by spending all of his time but a little explaining how the theology of the cross explains who God is. Most books on the subject approach the subject from the anthropological light, which is helpful, but it is also helpful to focus on God's self-revelation which is always for humans, but not always having humans as the subject of the verb.I recommend The Suffering of God especially for theologians who can get past some theological language and basic understanding of Luther's work, and who can at least power through the little bits of Latin and German that appear in the text. Also, just a nota bene, although the book is officially 289 pages long, everything after 173 is notes and index.Book Opening: Much of what is written about Luther's "Theology of the Cross" is written in terms of anthropology and better understanding the status of man before God, his Savior. However, it appears here that Dennis Ngien is more interested in the subject of the "Theology of the Cross" from the direction of the One who was put on the cross rather than those for whom He died for. This revised dissertation aims to set forth ideas about the nature and effect of divine suffering in order to better understand human suffering in the light of the cross. Focusing on the suffering of God may well help to explain the difference in a "Theology of Glory" (the opposite of Luther's "Theology of the Cross") by way of showing that if God can and does suffer - then that has implications for those who take up their own cross and follow Him. This would be in sharp distinction from a theology that would overstate the "power" of God and subsequently overstate the "power" of the Christian. Another revised dissertation. :-/ Looking forward to my brain swimming some more. Here we go!