Read Pug Hill by Alison Pace Online

pug-hill

For Hope McNeill, pugs are love, unconditional friendship, happiness, and freedom. She doesn't have one of her own (busy life, tiny apartment), but she does have Pug Hill in Central Park, where pugs (and their owners) from all over New York convene. She also has a crush on one of her co-workers, a flailing romantic relationship, and an unspeakable fear of public speaking.For Hope McNeill, pugs are love, unconditional friendship, happiness, and freedom. She doesn't have one of her own (busy life, tiny apartment), but she does have Pug Hill in Central Park, where pugs (and their owners) from all over New York convene. She also has a crush on one of her co-workers, a flailing romantic relationship, and an unspeakable fear of public speaking. Then Hope's father calls with an assignment: to make a speech at her parents' anniversary party. Frantic, she signs up for a public speaking class, but can't help wondering-will it transform her into an eloquent orator? Maybe some fears are so big that even all the pugs in the world might not be enough to assuage them....

Title : Pug Hill
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780425209714
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 312 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pug Hill Reviews

  • Megan Lynch
    2019-03-27 06:26

    The best thing about this book is the cover.

  • Rebecca
    2019-04-10 09:08

    I should state first off, that I pity the book that follows Lolita. The language here was simple, repetitive, and somewhat annoying. On the one hand, anyone can pick up this book and read it for what it is, a story about a 31-year-old woman who overcomes all of her anxieties in a three month period and then reconnects with "the one that got away." On the other it's pretty silly, and the scenes that take place are really shallow. I wanted to like this book though, and in some places I did, but mostly I felt that it was grazing the surface of the characters and rambling on unimportant details for its 300-some pages. Plus, there's not a whole lot going on with pugs, and to be honest, that was what drew me to the book in the first place. If you need a nice light read, I would suggest picking up a Jennifer Weiner or Melissa Bank book, because they actually do what this book aimed to do a lot better.

  •  PuMbA's MoMmy*•.♥.•*
    2019-04-05 08:27

    First off I must admit I even got to page 200 of this book because I found the writing style to be very annoying. The characters were flat in prrsonalities & the story line was not interesting. But I give it 2 stars because the book somehow managed to keep me reading for 200 pages......

  • Andrea
    2019-04-12 10:06

    In May, I read A Pug's Tale by Alison Pace and adored it. Recently, I was given the opportunity to see where the story all began when I received a copy of Pug Hill (now available in paperback) for review.With a relationship that makes her unhappy and a crush on an unavailable co-worker that makes her feel silly, Hope McNeill doesn't have the best luck in the romance department. Her apartment is too small to get the dog she wants. And though she works the coolest job -- she restores paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art -- she rarely sees the sunlight during working hours.But she has Pug Hill, a spot in Central Park where she can watch pugs prance and frolic, which gives her a sense of peace and comfort. When she can't escape to the park, she has her favorite Zoloft commercial saved on her DVR.After her parents ask her to give a speech at their anniversary party, Hope begins to panic and obsess. About a lot of things, like how she needs to stop sitting around and waiting for her life to begin. But first, she must learn to face her fears.When she signs up for a public-speaking class at the New School, she meets an eccentric group of people, including a gay poet, a hot, well-dressed man who says "dude" a lot, and an angry novelist. Through the weekly class assignments and getting to know her classmates, Hope discovers things about herself (bad habits, poor choices), gains self-confidence, and learns to love and forgive not only herself for past mistakes, but the people around her.Pug Hill is a charming book filled with whimsical characters, adorable pugs, and a realistic, likeable heroine.I really enjoyed reading the beginning of Hope's story and related to her frustrations and fears. Even better, I cheered her on and delighted in her journey and growth.If you like dogs, read this book. If you're single and overwhelmed by social expectations, read this book. If you enjoy fun, sweet stories, read this book.I highly recommend it.

  • Amy
    2019-04-01 07:25

    I thought this book would be a good "light" diversionary read form some nonfiction books I've been reading. Little did I suspect that some of what was in those books would turn up in this! I've been trying to build a practice of meditation and mindfulness, and at least two of the techniques for restorative breathing show up in Pug Hill as relaxation techniques, taught in Hope's public speaking class! Synchronicity, huh? Anyhow, the novel, which true to my original thoughts, was of the lighter variety, had some good expressions on the subjects of finding contentment, overcoming fears, and the love of a good dog. Not being a New Yorker, I was curious to see if Pug Hill really existed. I came upon these two links which give some interesting information:http://pughill.org/http://www.nytimes.com/1997/06/01/nyregion/while-the-pugs-eat-the-caviar-owners-bond.html

  • Kathleen
    2019-04-06 12:32

    I read this book at least four years ago. I bought it on a whim because of the title and the horribly photoshopped pugs on the cover. I thought I could get through the chick-lit writing and enjoy a silly story about a girl who wants a pug.Ultimately I could finish it, but it was excruciating. Even pugs couldn't get me through this. I love a pug (and sometimes I was absolutely in agreement with the protagonist on some life issues), but it was just very...meh. I would have liked some more depth. Just a little.

  • Lieselotte
    2019-04-18 12:31

    The somewhat odd combination of dogs and museum work (two things I love) was what attracted me to this book. Also, I thought this would be a light read for once (which it was!) In general, the story was okay. And as I came close to the ending, I was thinking about giving the book 3 stars. However, the final chapter let me down tremendously. It was SO CHEESY, like a fairy tale ending. This caused me to ultimately lower my rating to 2 stars. Sorry, not sorry!

  • Sue Degoey
    2019-04-05 06:32

    So I did read the entire book... at times it was a struggle, but as it went on it did prove to be a light but pleasant read. Not quite Bridget Jones, but not as awkward as the exposition was hinting.

  • Lisa
    2019-04-09 10:13

    Pugs, Pugs and more Pugs!!!! YAY!! Awesome book :)

  • Erica
    2019-04-09 13:24

    Beneath the wonderful dog scenes, and hilarious public speaking scenes, I was disappointed that it was ultimately another "Girl is unhappy until she finds a man" story.

  • Concertina
    2019-04-13 07:31

    No lo soporté, ni siquiera habla tanto de pugs o tal vez no sabía qué esperarme.Pero bueno para leer problemas superficiales de una chica de edad media, mejor me voy a twitter.Gracias.

  • Bella Austin
    2019-04-10 10:11

    I had heard about this book but only recently purchased a copy to read. Silly me, as this was a delightfully, heart touching journey through the eyes of a young, well educated, woman in her early 30's.The story spans the period of a few months prior her parent's fortieth wedding Anniversary, for which Hope McNeill, the youngest daughter, is asked to 'give a speech.' The issue is that Hope has a fear that approaches a terror...public speaking. It began in 10th grade English class and has blossomed since. In fact, our Hope even chose her life's occupation based upon this fear. Hope is an Art Restorer.As Hope trudges up to Pug Hill, her personal contemplation site, she reveals to us many issues that are forcing her to make changes in her life. There is Evan, a possible job promotion, a fellow worker that has caught her attention, her sister's possible life change, and yes...the monster in the closet...Public Speaking.I loved the running commentary flowing throughout Hope's mind accompanied with a sound track that was familiar to myself as well. I found myself reading aloud paragraphs and even chapters to my husband. We both found this book to be an honest look at life that spans the generations.I am looking forward to reading the next book written by Ms. Pace.

  • Jess F
    2019-04-03 12:15

    5 stars. Because of the PUGS <3

  • Lindsay
    2019-04-10 13:06

    What a cute book! Favorite takeaway: everyone needs their place like pug hill :)

  • Leah
    2019-04-10 13:03

    A couple of years ago I read my first Alison Pace novel, City Dog. I really enjoyed it – it’s so rare to read a novel that’s almost exclusively about dogs. However that is Pace’s forte – if you’re looking for anyone who writes about dogs so well then Pace is your girl. And I’m saying that having only read two of her novels. So, high praise indeed. Pug Hill is one of Alison’s earlier novels but since it’s a) coming out in November in mass-market paperback and b) it had a sequel released earlier this year that’s sitting on my shelf waiting to be read, I figured it was time I read Pug Hill. And it was puggalicious (I am so copyrighting that word…).If the title hasn’t already clued you in, and you haven’t seen the book cover filled with pugs, then I’d like to let you know that Pug Hill is all about pugs. (I know, I am nothing if not obvious.) I mean, don’t get me wrong it’s about other things, too – Hope overcoming her fear of public speaking; Hope overcoming her crush on her girlfriended-up co-worker Elliott (no, I’m not entirely sure girlfriended-up is a word either, but it works, so it stays); Hope being Hope and overthinking everything; Hope overthinking her relationship with Evan (yup, despite crushing on Elliott, Hope has a boyfriend, named Evan). But, mostly, the novel is about the pugs and about Pug Hill. About how Pug Hill is Hope’s salvation; it’s where she goes when she needs to put the world to rights, when she needs to know there’s something that is solid in her life.I will admit that I found the whole Hope overcoming her public speaking phobia to be both over the top (in a good way) and not as over the top as it should have been. I mean, the build up as Hope tries to overcome her public speaking is the over the top part, but the actual Hope trying to overcome her public speaking at her parents’ anniversary is rather brushed over somewhat. It sort of let the book down a bit for me. I mean, we’ve spent lessons with Hope as she tries to be able to speak freely in public without freaking out. We’ve spent hours at Pug Hill with her as she tries to overcome it. We’ve listened to why she can’t speak publicly, we’ve understood… So the end result should have had more time spent on it. It should have been bigger than it was. But sadly it wasn’t. It was all over much too quickly for my liking.Pug Hill is very much about Hope; there are few secondary characters and the ones we meet are meetings that are rather brief (thankfully in Pamela’s case that’s a good thing, we barely even saw Pamela, Hope’s best friend, but I didn’t like her one bit). That can be good and bad; Hope was an excellent character, someone I liked immediately, someone I felt I clicked with (if that doesn’t make me some kind of weirdo), but it was disappointing to not get to meet more of Hope’s friends, more of Hope’s family. We heard of the things going on in Hope’s family (including some amusing conversations regarding a tent – oh, whoops, I hope Hope’s father doesn’t read my review; he doesn’t like tents…) which helped massively but it was a somewhat quiet novel without any other characters to get a grip of, however Hope makes up for it nicely.Pug Hill was hugely enjoyable. I liked the pugs, I liked Hope, I liked the story, I just felt the conclusion was a bit of a let down. I got to the end of the book and, well, it didn’t feel finished. I thought maybe I was missing some pages (metaphorically speaking since I was reading it on my Kindle). But everything leading up to it was brilliant. Alison Pace knows her dogs, and I was in tears at the words she wrote about Captain, Hope’s parents’ ageing dog even though he was perfectly fine. (Honestly, I’m not lying; there was nothing wrong with him; it’s just… the way Pace writes and the way I imaginged Captain being so happy, it made me well up.) This is a tale for all dog lovers. No offense to those who don’t like dogs, but they generally sneer at books filled with dogs and unless you love dogs you won’t love Pug Hill. I loved dogs and I loved Pug Hill. I can’t wait to read A Pug’s Tale and be back with Hope and the pugs.

  • Danielle
    2019-03-31 12:24

    If only life were as simple as a bench in Central Park surrounded by the most adorable dogs on earth. At least that’s what Hope McNeill wishes for, a life with no cares except which of her favorite pugs will make an appearance at Pug Hill. When she’s there her troubles slip from her mind with ease; no worrying about a lingering relationship that just doesn’t seem to be working, no pesky crush on a co-worker and most importantly no speech to give at her parents upcoming anniversary party. Through the help of a rather unorthodox public speaking class Hope not only discovers a few new friends, but something else entirely. She may have discovered just what it is she wants out of life.Alison Pace is what I would classify as a quintessential Chick Lit author. Her novels have humor, romance, waffling leading ladies not entirely sure of where they’re headed and fantastic dialogue. In the case of Pug Hill, it not only has all of those elements but it also has pugs. My absolute favorite part of the story were the opportunities Hope took to escape to her favorite spot in Central Park, pug hill, to watch the pugs which she knew all by name. It was adorable and I could absolutely envision sitting there with her taking in this fantastic view.With the quirky and fun addition of the pugs to the novel, you’d think that might be enough to make the entire reading experience enjoyable. It absolutely was, but Alison Pace also created a character in Hope that has you laughing hysterically at her goofy behavior. What was fun for me was the opportunity to take a look inside what was going on in Hope’s mind. There is quite a bit of inner monologue throughout the story and at times it does get a bit sluggish, but for the most part it was simply hilarious. It was especially funny in the instances where she spoke with her parents about her sister’s upcoming relocation to a commune with her earth-friendly boyfriend, priceless! Hope said and did nearly everything any normal yet slightly insecure girl might do, but as a readers you’re able to watch from the outside in. All of Hope’s doubts, thoughts and feelings were laid out for the reader to take in and enjoy.An absolutely adorable story line with a wonderfully realistic leading lady, Pug Hill is the perfect read for Chick Lit fans who may also have love for pugs & dogs as well. Hope’s journey from a woman attached to a not-so-great relationship to a girl in love with her co-worker and then to an ending that brings everything home with a smile is so incredibly delightful. This was such an enjoyable Chick Lit read that left me feeling happy and looking forward to the next book in the series, A Pug’s Tale.Originally reviewed and copyrighted at Chick Lit Reviews.

  • Laurel-Rain
    2019-04-19 12:16

    Even as Holly Golightly's special place was Tiffany's, Hope McNeill's is definitely Pug Hill.Before we get very far into this story, we learn how much Hope loves pugs—and the pugs that congregate on their own special place in Central Park.Hope is an art restorer at the Met...in New York, of course; she is also a thirty-something single who is in a not-very-satisfying relationship with Evan at the beginning of this story. We also learn early on that Hope's older sister Darcy is the "pretty one," the one she, Hope, is always compared to and found wanting. Or so she believes.Hope's parents are about to celebrate their fortieth wedding anniversary, and her mother has asked Hope to make the speech. Now if there's anything Hope hates more than a life without Pug Hill, it would be making speeches.Which is why we find her signing up for a class in Overcoming Presentation Anxiety at the New School.I loved the character of Hope—both in this story and the one that follows, "A Pug's Tale"—so for me, this one was a great journey we can take, along with Hope, as she explores her life, her career, and the men she has met along the way.While preparing for a speech about that very topic in class, she remembers Benji Brown from high school. And in deconstructing what she loved most about that relationship, she discovers the necessary ingredients to what would make a happy relationship for her.Funny, sometimes sad, and always captivating, "Pug Hill" is a story I won't soon forget. I loved how Hope, as the first-person narrator, seemed to invite the reader into her head and her heart. You can't help rooting for her, as she ambles along, hoping to find that special feeling we all seek in our lives. Someone who loves us just as we are. Five stars.

  • Suzanna
    2019-04-10 12:04

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. While I can't say it's the best piece of literature I've ever read, it was highly entertaining. I received this book as a gift from a friend of mine. When I first read the cover, I thought, "Oh, no." It looked like it would be either A) a book form "chic flick", or B) a silly book about dogs. I was pleasantly surprised that neither was true.Okay, I give that this is a book that probably appeals more to dog people than those who aren't so fond of man's best friend. But not entirely. This is more about the main character, Hope, coming to know herself, and becoming okay with who she is, than it is about dogs. In fact, Hope doesn't even own a dog herself. When she is looking for a "pick-me-up", she stops by a place in Central Park where pug owners exercise their dogs regularly. Her relationship with dogs, actually, parallels her search for a life mate. She views from afar, dabbles a bit, admires others', but hasn't yet come to a place where she makes that connection with one of her own. A major part of Hope's development comes through her attending a class to overcome her fear of public speaking. She has been asked by her parents to give a speech at an event for them, and is prepping to do so. This leads to some hilarious observations, which helped make this a worthwhile read for me. This book was light and fun - definitely a keeper.

  • The Rainbow Zebra
    2019-04-21 09:32

    I, like the main character of "Pug Hill" not only adore pugs, but want one for my own. I will own one someday, hopefully soon, but until then, I found myself living vicariously though Alison Pace's humorous romance.Told by Hope McAlister, she is faced with a terror-inducing task--giving a speech at her parents' 40th anniversary party. Her life has been shaped by her fear of public speaking so although she hesitantly agrees, her world is thrown upsidedown. The remedy--a class for overcoming speech anxiety.The beginning of the book comes off very much like so many chick-lit novels do. But as Hope begins to really take her comfort zone outside the box, it gained even more of my interest.My only criticism that would have taken away half a star was the author's overuse of commas and the word "actually". My great-grandma loved using commas that way, so I forgave Pace.Then ending--which I will not give away--earned back the half star and made this one of my favorite reads for 2010. Now if only there were a Pug Hill near me...***Exciting update! After sending my review to Alison Pace, she let me know she is currently working on the sequel to Pug Hill, due June 2011! SQUEE!***

  • Alannah Davis
    2019-03-26 13:05

    I forced myself to read this to the end of Chapter 1, in desperate hope that I had not wasted $7.99 of my hard-earned money. First, I discovered that this book is written in present tense, a style I despise. Still, if the story and characters are good, I can forget my distaste of present tense as I become absorbed in the story. No such luck here. The characters and dialogue are insipid, the story just plain silly. Hope is horrified because her dad has asked her to make a 40th anniversary speech for him and Mom. But oh no! Hope is terrified of public speaking and doesn't know how to tell Daddy without sounding hostile and churlish! (Hey, Hope, these are your parents. If they hadn't already noticed your huge fear of public speaking when you dropped an 11th-grade class because of it, they'll understand.) Additionally, the poorly done editing of this book is apparent as early as the first paragraph of Chapter 1. Not surprisingly to me, this book was published by Berkley. Alas, they still cannot afford a proofreader (refer to my review of Maggie Sefton's "Unraveled.")Between the present tense style, the tepid story and the inane protagonist, I found this book unreadable and I quit at the end of Chapter 1.

  • Jeannie and Louis Rigod
    2019-04-23 07:13

    I had heard about this book but only recently purchased a copy to read. Silly me, as this was a delightfully, heart touching journey through the eyes of a young, well educated, woman in her early 30's. The story spans the period of a few months prior her parent's fortieth wedding Anniversary, for which Hope McNeill, the youngest daughter, is asked to 'give a speech.' The issue is that Hope has a fear that approaches a terror...public speaking. It began in 10th grade English class and has blossomed since. In fact, our Hope even chose her life's occupation based upon this fear. Hope is an Art Restorer.As Hope trudges up to Pug Hill, her personal contemplation site, she reveals to us many issues that are forcing her to make changes in her life. There is Evan, a possible job promotion, a fellow worker that has caught her attention, her sister's possible life change, and yes...the monster in the closet...Public Speaking.I loved the running commentary flowing throughout Hope's mind accompanied with a sound track that was familiar to myself as well. I found myself reading aloud paragraphs and even chapters to my husband. We both found this book to be an honest look at life that spans the generations.I am looking forward to reading the next book written by Ms. Pace.

  • Sarah Sammis
    2019-04-21 12:29

    My across-the-street neighbors had a bunch of pugs when I was a kid. They were the sweetest, nicest dogs. Because of them, I have a soft spot for pugs. I had to therefore give Pug Hill by Alison Pace a read.By all accounts, I should have enjoyed Pug Hill. It takes place in New York City, it has pugs, heroine Hope McNeil works as an art restorer and yet none of these individually entertaining elements is enough to carry the story.Hope McNeil's parents are coming up on their 40th wedding anniversary. They want Hope to give a speech but she's terrified of public speaking (of course) and spends the remainder of the book dreading the speech and coming to terms with her commitment to give it. Along the way she has boyfriend trouble and tries to seek meaning to life by watching the pugs of Pug Hill in Central Park.That's it. That's all there is to this 312 page novel. The best chapter of the entire book is the chapter after she gives the speech. With her new found self confidence she takes charge and strikes up a romance with an old friend. This is where the book should have started from!

  • Casee Marie
    2019-04-26 12:18

    Pug Hill follows Hope McNeil through the intensely relatable trials and tribulations of her life as a paintings restorer at the Met, as a newly-single singleton, as a girl struggling for confidence in a sometimes all-too-confident world and as the only person to regularly visit Central Park’s Pug Hill without, unfortunately, a pug of her own. Hope declares that Pug Hill, the hotbed of all pug adventures in the city, is to her what Tiffany's is to Holly Golightly. It’s her happy, blissful place where no bad happens and her troubles can’t possibly touch her. And it’s a place infused with the happiness, understanding and charm that encompasses the pug breed. Nothing brings Hope down at Pug Hill – not even the thought of facing her extreme fear of public speaking when she finds herself in the position of preparing a speech for her parents’ anniversary party....read my full review, plus a Q&A with the author and giveaway here (ends 12/15/11).

  • Jen
    2019-04-11 06:07

    I wish we could give half-stars here - I'd really like to give this 3.5 stars. But I'm rounding up, giving the benefit of the doubt. This is a pretty standard chick lit novel, with a cute angle about the heroine's love of dogs (pugs in particular). She's infatuated with a co-worker who's unavailable, she and her boyfriend break up, she's terrified of public speaking but just promised to give a speech at her parents' 40th wedding anniversary party, her sister gets all of the attention, etc. Nothing unusual. I enjoyed reading it...but I felt it lacked something. There was no big moment of drama, humiliation, angst. There's a lot of tiny annoyances and sigh-inducing moments for the heroine, but nothing big. The character does experience growth...but all in all, a lot of the book is like experiencing events happening to a friend in real life. Which is fine...for a friend in real life. For a book, you generally want a little more bang, and that was lacking here.

  • Jo
    2019-03-30 14:16

    Not a fantastically deep novel, but neither was it entirely lacking in thought. It was about dogs and family as much as it was about Hope finding a man, which I really appreciated, since there is more to life than men. I did not appreciate the wonky sentence structures. I get that the author was trying to go for a style that was more reflective of thought or speech patterns than proper writing, but I just got tired of the comma splices and the half-finished sentences that change in the middle. Not that I was irritated enough to drop my rating much (it went from maybe, oh, 3.25 stars to 2.8 stars) or stop reading. Just that when I read books, I want sentences. If I want a conversational style, I'll go have a conversation. Still, other than the style, this was exactly what I wanted when some random 24-hour flu attacked me this weekend. No regrets, but also not going to revisit this one in the future.

  • Jenny
    2019-04-09 07:13

    I am completely enamored with this novel. An avid pug owner and lover, I spotted this book at Target. The cover alone displays a cityscape with tons of pugs congregating atop a hill. I knew that I just had to have it!Although, Hope uses Pug hill in New York City as a reprieve from her daily life, Pugs do not really take the center stage in this novel. Instead, Hope takes the center stage with her boyfriend dramas, fear of public speaking, and general angst at finding a suitable life partner.I really feel that this was well written with good humor sprinkled throughout. Alison Pace did a great job at helping you identify with the Hope, the main character. She was true to life. Hope seemed to have a lot of crushes. No main love interests until the end, which was absolutely lovely.But, I'll leave you to conjecture your own feeling on the ending. Trust me it will put an big smile on your face. The same smile that I use when I look at my pug, Pikachu. :-)

  •  Gigi Ann
    2019-04-24 11:32

    I am a dog/cat/animal lover and the first thing that drew me to this book was the cover. It looked like a fun book to read. I liked this book, but wouldn't go so far as to say it will become a classic. But it was a very good light read. I was looking for a cute quirky, light read, and found this was the book for me.I thought it was going to be a book all about pugs, it wasn't, but the love of pugs shines through, making it a charming story that goes into nice detail about the way dogs of all kinds touch our lives.My favorite quote from the book is..."No matter what anyone says, the thing is, I realize, is that a dog (of the four-legged variety) can't ever be called The One That Got Away. Because once you love them, and they love you, they're always with you. They never really go away."I enjoyed this book and awarded it 3***

  • Andrea
    2019-04-08 07:19

    2.5 out of 5 ratingYes, I have to admit that the puppies on the cover drew me in. I love dogs so I couldn't wait to read this book. Unfortunately, I was disappointed.Often times, I'll feel sympathetic for a character which usually makes me like them more. But in this story, I just felt that Hope was pitiful. I never really liked her. It might sound mean, but I found myself thinking that she was pathetic. And that doesn't really make me want to root for her.The very end was nice and happy and you can imagine a happily-ever-after situation in the future. So there's always that I suppose.

  • Kate Elizabeth
    2019-04-26 11:24

    This book takes place in New York and was published in 2006, when I was living there. I wish I had read it then; it so perfectly captures what it's like to be young and single and confused and living in the city. Throw in an obsession with pugs (I had this) and a secret hope of finding "the one" (I had this, though most of my time in the city was brokenhearted and bewildered) and a tendency to see things as signs (I sometimes still have this) and it was basically like reading a book about my 24-year-old self. Only with a really bad copy editor who (more than once) couldn't figure out the difference between "your" and "you're." Still, I'm holding onto this one.

  • Rhonda
    2019-04-22 08:07

    This book was not what I thought it was going to be about, so I was kind of disappointed in it. It is well written, but not a book that I would of normally read.I found Holly to be a 30 something gal who over thinks everything and can't find happiness anywhere. It seems the only thing she is happy about is dogs, with Pugs being her favorite. But the book really does not talk that much about "dogs", but more about her problems. I suppose I would recommend this book to someone if you wanted a fast read for a plane ride.