Read They're a Weird Mob by Nino Culotta John O'Grady Online

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Giovanni 'Nino' Culotta is an Italian immigrant, who comes to Australia as a journalist, employed by an Italian publishing house, to write articles about Australians and their way of life for those Italians that might want to emigrate to Australia.In order to learn about real Australians, Nino takes a job as a brickie's labourer with a man named Joe Kennedy. The comedy ofGiovanni 'Nino' Culotta is an Italian immigrant, who comes to Australia as a journalist, employed by an Italian publishing house, to write articles about Australians and their way of life for those Italians that might want to emigrate to Australia.In order to learn about real Australians, Nino takes a job as a brickie's labourer with a man named Joe Kennedy. The comedy of the novel revolves around his attempts to understand English as it was spoken in Australia by the working classes in the 1950s and 1960s. Nino had previously only learned 'good' English from a textbook.The novel is a social commentary on Australian society of the period; specifically male, working class society. Women mostly feature as cameos in the story with the exception of Kay (whose surname is not revealed in the novel), who becomes Nino's wife. In the novel, Nino meets Kay in a cafe in Manly and their introduction is effected by Nino trying to teach Kay that she cannot eat spaghetti using a spoon.The final message of the novel is that immigrants to Australia should count themselves fortunate and should make efforts to assimilate into Australian society, including learning to speak Australian English. However, there is also a satirical undercurrent aimed at Australian society as a country of migrants....

Title : They're a Weird Mob
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780947116927
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

They're a Weird Mob Reviews

  • Colleen O'grady
    2019-05-06 10:31

    Seeing as how my father wrote this book, what would I think? Hilariously funny and has recently been re-published again by Text publishers and a very clever Dad. it is the story of Nino, who finds himself in the embarrassing situation of trying to communicate with Australians, priding himself on the fact that he spoke English. But you see...there is English and their is 'English' of the Australian kind.

  • Tien
    2019-05-12 15:44

    Most Australians speak English like I speak Hindustani, which I don’t. In general, they use English words, but in a way that makes no sense to anyone else. And they don’t use our European vowel sounds, so that even if they do construct a normal sentence, it doesn’t sound like one. This made it necessary for me, until I become accustomed to it, to translate everything that was said to me twice, first into English and then into Italian. So my replies were always slow, and those long pauses prompted many belligerent remarks, such as ‘Well don’t stand there like a dill; d’yer wanta beer or dontcha?’ Now that I have had five years of practice, I find that I am able to think in English, and often in the Australian kind of English, so that when some character picks me for a dill, he is likely to be told quick smart to suck his scone in!Dunno what exactly I expected from this book… Mis-adventures of an immigrant with some humour involved at most. But, what I got was absolute hilarity –I was laughing so much and I just couldn’t put the book down. Most of the hilarity, of course, was due to misunderstanding the ‘Australian English’ and Australian ways.If you’re Australian, you may enjoy this look at yerself form another’s point of view. Even though it’s stereotypical of the Aussie working class in mid 20th century, I found it wildly entertaining and made time flew by very quickly. It’s a pretty short read too. However, I have to confess that whilst I can see traces of these type of Australian-ess around me, my Aussie friends (born & bred) don’t speak like this (I’m not referring to the accents but rather to the specific lingo).If you are not Australian, you may find this book a bit of a struggle as the writing takes into consideration the way the people speak (accents etc), for example ‘Owyagoin’ (How you going), Orrightmate (all right, mate), etc. In addition, of course, the Aussie slang gets more than a little confusing.In my own experience as a migrant, I didn’t find it as much of a problem –I don’t recall of having to struggle with English (nor ‘Australian English’) too much. I probably didn’t get many of the jokes and I still have a bit of a problem with some sayings now and then but other than that, if you actually hear my speak, I sound mostly Australian (excepting some little nuisance of words). At the end of the book, the author was encouraging migrants to mix into the Australian cultures and not to cling tenaciously stubbornly to one’s original cultures. Indeed, Australia provides that opportunity for a better life but to build a country which supports better life, we would all need to work together wherever you’re from.That episode of Friday night and yesterday illustrates the informality of the Australian way of life, and the Australian’s unquenchable energy and thirst. He works hard, with much cursing and swearing, and is most unhappy when he has no work to do. He loves beer and tobacco, and impassioned arguments. He is kind and generous and abusive. He will swear at you, and call you insulting names, and love you like a brother. He is without malice. He will fight you with skill and ferocity, and buy you a beer immediately afterwards. He is a man of many contradictions, but his confidence and self-sufficing are inspiring. If he is beaten in a fight or an argument, he laughs about it the next day, and tells his mates, ‘ The bastard was too good fer me.’ He doesn’t resent a defeat of ‘that bastard who done me over’. It takes a European a long time to begin to understand him.

  • Marianne
    2019-05-02 15:44

    They’re a Weird Mob is the first book by John O’Grady writing under the pseudonym Nino Culotta, and purports to tell the tale of Nino, an Italian journalist sent to Australia to write articles about the country and her people for Italians to read. Nino has learned English, so he shouldn’t have a problem, his boss thinks. But English, Nino finds, is not Australian. As Nino experiences true Aussie culture in the form of Kings Bloody Cross, labouring for a brickie, drinking in the pub, picking a fight in the street, almost being arrested, travelling on the train, being invited to tea, a buck’s night, a wedding reception, going shooting and swimming at Bondi, he relates his interactions with Australians and his puzzlement with their language. Some of the conversations he overhears, like the discussion of horse racing in a café, are confusing to me now, after having lived in Australia for 55 years. Nino learns about the attitude of many Australians to migrants, but finds his appearance and his willingness to “have a go” soon defuse this, and finds himself taking part in many Aussie-male rites of passage. He also learns that many words (ticket, drum, shout, before, only) have multiple meanings. This novel is a very long way from being Politically Correct: when Nino decides he wants to marry, the discussion on “sheilas” begins “blondes are easy on the eye, but they get dirty quick”. One needs to remember, though, that it was written in 1957, and reflects attitudes of the day, and if one bears this in mind, there are many laugh-out-loud moments. While O’Grady’s writing does an excellent job of portraying a naïve Italian migrant, his eulogising about the Australian and how to become a good one is a bit transparent. Hilarious!

  • Jan
    2019-05-04 16:47

    This is a funny and clever book. I had read it many years ago, but I still laughed all over again when I chose it for the Read Around Australia challenge. Insightful and accurate about the Australian character, it is a forerunner to the delights of comedians like Paul Hogan when he first climbed down from Sydney Harbour Bridge.If only we had more migrants like Nino Culotta who so enthusiastically embraced his new life.

  • Cita Firdausy
    2019-05-22 14:43

    Howsthebookgoin' mate orright? orright, i exclaimed. 3.5 stars cause it's funny.

  • Big Pete
    2019-05-05 15:24

    As an Aussie, I can proudly proclaim this as 'a fair-dinkum classic'. Sadly, hardly anyone under the age of forty says 'fair dinkum' anymore. they're a weird mob is a hilarious tale of a likable Italian migrant named Nino Culotta trying to understand the lingo we spoke Downunder in the '50s and '60s. He mixes with bricklayers, policemen, lifesavers, makes friends, learns the language, engages in fisticuffs, gets married and makes a niche for himself in Oz. Most of the slang used at the time has died out, but that does not detract from this great tale. Unusually for a humorous novel, there's quite a bit of social commentary and philosophising done by Nino. However, this only assists in assuring John O'Grady's literary genius, for the odd bit of philosophising done by Nino feels completely natural - the mood feels, scarily enough, like the way YOU occasionally philosophise inside your own head. Though not quite as good as its sequel; gone fishin', they're a weird mob is a hilarious read and a true Australian classic.'owyergoinmate, orright? Yeah, orright mate.

  • Text Publishing
    2019-05-21 13:24

    ‘A riotous comedy.’Age‘Nino Culotta encouraged Australians to laugh at themselves, while providing a walloping hint for the ‘New Australians’ who were gracing our shores: ‘Get yourself accepted…and you will enter a world that you never dreamed existed,’ he wrote. ‘And once you have entered it, you will never leave it.’ The book remains just as relevant today: Weird Mob is about good people trying to make a go of things. With its rollicking and affectionate humour, it showcases our manners, our wit and our distinctive vernacular— where ‘they open their mouths no more than is absolutely necessary’.’Jacinta Tynan‘…a rollicking comedy about an Italian journalist in Fifties Australia trying to get his head around the natives’ vernacular. Anybody who has the subtitles on for Kath & Kim will get the joke.’Telegraph

  • Margaret Sharp
    2019-05-09 16:50

    "They're a Weird Mob" is not the sort of book I normally read. Its strongest point lies in its marvellous evocation of the language of the blue-collar worker: in this case, the bricklayer.The well-educated Italian hero, Nino, accepts work as a brickie. His language skills contrast beautifully with those of his work-mates who speak in broadest Australian. There is humour throughout the tale. I particularly enjoyed the story of Nino's efforts at courtship: wonderfully unconventional and yet remarkably successful.A fun read! An Australian classic!

  • Shane Moore
    2019-05-18 15:50

    I enjoyed this light-hearted glimpse of the culture of working-class 1950's Australia. The characters are caricatures rather than stereotypes, especially the Italian narrator, so don't expect realism. Instead, prepare for something short, easy to read, and funny. Surprisingly, there are a few moments of depth addressing racism and anti-immigrant bigotry interwoven with the book's humor, and they're appropriately tasteful.

  • Will
    2019-04-25 10:52

    What is an Australian? Being married to one, this is a question I often ask myself. This very funny book, actually written by an Australian journalist using the pseudonym of an Italian immigrant, attempts to answer that question, at least in the 1950s. Thoroughly enjoyable, often hysterically funny, but also very true about Australia and Australians.

  • Sally
    2019-05-03 16:45

    Mad funny :) The trials of an Italian in 1960s Australia, where suddenly everyone speaks rather different English to what he learned from textbooks! I loved when he was learning the use of 'bloody' and cheerfully asked a cabbie to take him to King's Bloody Cross.

  • Velvetink
    2019-05-14 14:47

    review soon

  • ☼♄Jülie 
    2019-05-03 15:29

    Laughed myself to tears!!! I was in absolute stitches from start to finish!

  • Andy Hickman
    2019-04-28 18:43

    “They're a Weird Mob” by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady)This book is iconic. I laughed so much reading. The best quotes I haven't had time to type up, but so many of the characters I have seen personified in the Aussies that I have known. ****- - “There is no better way of life in the world than that of the Australian. I firmly believe this. The grumbling, growling, cursing, profane, laughing, beer drinking, abusive, loyal-to-his-mates Australian is one of the few free men left on this earth. He fears no one, crawls to no one, bludges on no one, and acknowledges no master. Learn his way. Learn his language. Get yourself accepted as one of him; and you will enter a world that you never dreamed existed. And once you have entered it, you will never leave it.” - - Most Australians speak English like I speak Hindustani, which I don’t. In general, they use English words, but in a way that makes no sense to anyone else. And they don’t use our European vowel sounds, so that even if they do construct a normal sentence, it doesn’t sound like one. This made it necessary for me, until I become accustomed to it, to translate everything that was said to me twice, first into English and then into Italian. So my replies were always slow, and those long pauses prompted many belligerent remarks, such as ‘Well don’t stand there like a dill; d’yer wanta beer or dontcha?’ Now that I have had five years of practice, I find that I am able to think in English, and often in the Australian kind of English, so that when some character picks me for a dill, he is likely to be told quick smart to suck his scone in!- - That episode of Friday night and yesterday illustrates the informality of the Australian way of life, and the Australian’s unquenchable energy and thirst. He works hard, with much cursing and swearing, and is most unhappy when he has no work to do. He loves beer and tobacco, and impassioned arguments. He is kind and generous and abusive. He will swear at you, and call you insulting names, and love you like a brother. He is without malice. He will fight you with skill and ferocity, and buy you a beer immediately afterwards. He is a man of many contradictions, but his confidence and self-sufficing are inspiring. If he is beaten in a fight or an argument, he laughs about it the next day, and tells his mates, ‘ The bastard was too good fer me.’ He doesn’t resent a defeat of ‘that bastard who done me over’. It takes a European a long time to begin to understand him.- - Good-o. We’ll wash up an’ scrape off the whiskers an’ knock over a few more bottles before we go, eh? Best part of a dozen still left. Decent feed, Nino. Yer c’d get a job as a shearer’s cook any time.They’d all go on strike, Pat saidI hate sheep, Dennis said. Stupid bastards.You was a jackeroo once, wasn’t you, Den?Yeah. Walgett. Nothing’s worse.Worse than layin bricks?YeahMust a bin crook, then.Sheep! Worse than bloody turkeys.Seen a mob o’ turkey tryin’ ter’ get out through a nail hole in a tin shed once. Killed ‘emselves. Pat saidYeah, said Dennis, ‘a hawk c’n come an’ pinch all their young uns, an’ they take no notice. Bit ‘o paper blows along the ground an’ they get the tom tits an’ fly into a fence an’ knock ‘emselves cold. They have turkeys in Italy, Nino?Yes, DennisY’ain’t saying much. Wot’s the matter, mate? Tired?No, I’m not tired.Keepin awful quiet.I am sure the conversation is very interesting, but unfortunately I cannot understand it.- - Australians like giving people tea and advice. The tea is always very good, and sometimes the advice too."

  • Le koala Lit
    2019-05-02 12:48

    John O’Grady dit 'Nino Culotta' écrit They’re a weird mob (que l’on peut traduire par Quel drôle de peuple) en 1957. O' Grady s'est fait passé pour un immigrés italien pour écrire ce livre. Il nous parle avec beaucoup d'humour des australiens. Nino Culotta, le héro, est un personnage naïf est très attachant. Je vous livre plus bas quelques extraits.Un peu de contexte : Pendant la ruée vers l’or (deuxième moitié du 19e siècle), de nombreux européens ont immigré en Australie à la recherche d’une vie meilleure. Quelques milliers d’italiens ont immigrés en Australie à cette période. Les italiens sont ensuite venus en masse après la seconde guerre mondiale. Entre 1950 et 1970 (période à laquelle se déroule l’histoire racontée par Nino), plus de 350000 italiens se sont installés sur le sol australien. Aujourd’hui, on estime que l’Italie est la patrie d’origine de plus de 800 000 australiens (nés en Australie, mais dont les ancêtres étaient italiens).L’histoire : Nino Culotta, journaliste du nord de l'Italie, est envoyé en Australie par son éditeur pour étudier et partager ses expériences sur le pays avec les lecteurs italiens. (Aucune traduction n’étant disponible, je vous soumets ma propre traduction).« Un jour mon chef m’a dit, ‘Nino, nous allons t’envoyer en Australie’. Naturellement, j’ai demandé pourquoi, et il a dit, ‘ Il y a beaucoup d’italiens en Australie, et nos lecteurs voudraient savoir comment ils s’en sortent. Il y a également beaucoup d’italiens qui veulent aller en Australie, et ils voudraient en savoir un peu plus, mais surtout sur les australiens. Je sais, dit-il, que les australiens parlent anglais. Tu parles anglais, donc tu iras, tu poseras des questions, et tu nous diras comment sont vraiment ces australiens'. » Voila ses premières impressions sur la langue anglaise différente de celle qu’il a apprise dans les manuels.« La plupart des australiens parlent anglais comme je parle hindi, que je ne parle pas. En général, ils utilisent des mots anglais mais d’une façon que personne ne comprend. Et ils n’utilisent pas les même sons pour les voyelles, donc même s’ils construisent une phrase normale, on n’y comprend rien. »Je ne peuxpas traduire l’extrait suivant sans perdre toute l'absudité de la conversation. Mais pour ceux qui connaissent l’anglais, ça en dit long. Une conversation entre trois des amis de Nino.- « Good-o. We’ll wash up an’ scrape off the whiskers an’ knock over a few more bottles before we go, eh? Best part of a dozen still left. Decent feed, Nino. Yer c’d get a job as a shearer’s cook any time.- They’d all go on strike, Pat said- I hate sheep, Dennis said. Stupid bastards.- You was a jackeroo once, wasn’t you, Den?- Yeah. Walgett. Nothing’s worse.- Worse than layin bricks?- Yeah- Must a bin crook, then.- Sheep! Worse than bloody turkeys.- Seen a mob o’ turkey tryin’ ter’ get out through a nail hole in a tin shed once. Killed ‘emselves. Pat said- Yeah, said Dennis, ‘a hawk c’n come an’ pinch all their young uns, an’ they take no notice. Bit ‘o paper blows along the ground an’ they get the tom tits an’ fly into a fence an’ knock ‘emselves cold. They have turkeys in Italy, Nino?- Yes, Dennis- Y’ain’t saying much. Wot’s the matter, mate? Tired?- No, I’m not tired.- Keepin awful quiet.- I am sure the conversation is very interesting, but unfortunately I cannot understand it. » [Je suis certain que votre conversation est très intéressante, malheureusement je ne la comprend pas.]Ces dialogues sont assez datés, et ne représentent pas vraiment la façon dont les australiens parlent aujourd’hui. Ce dialecte était répandu au milieu du 20e siècle parmi la classe ouvrière. Aujourd’hui, les australiens des grandes villes sont très compréhensibles, même s’il m’arrive souvent de les faire répéter.Voilà un autre passage amusant lors de la première baignade de Nino à Bondy Beach, la célèbre plage de Sydney.« Il y avait beaucoup de gens dans l’eau, mais ils étaient tous regroupés au même endroit. Ça, j’ai pensé, c’est sans doute à cause des requins. Je n’aime pas nager dans des endroits où il n’y a personne, un requin n’aurait aucun mal à me renifler. Mais un jeune homme m’avait dit qu’il n’y avait rien à craindre. J’étais donc déterminé à montrer à ces australiens que les italiens du nord n’ont pas peur des requins. […] Quand j’ai eu de l’eau jusqu'à la taille, j’ai entendu un sifflet venant de la plage. […] C’était eux qu’on appelait Sauveteurs. C’étaient de très courageux jeunes gens. Sans aucun doute, ils devaient saluer mon courage. À ce moment, j’eu l’impression que tout l’océan pacifique se déversait sur moi. J’étais assommé, et je me retrouvais au fond de l’océan, le visage dans le sable. […] le sauveteur m’atteignit, il semblait en colère.- Qu’est-ce que vous foutez ?!?- Je nage, c’est très agréable.- Allez nager entre les drapeaux- Je n’ai pas vu de drapeaux- Allez là-bas avec la foule- Je n’aime pas les foules- Ah ! Les nouveaux australiens. Je les connais. Vous êtes en plein courant là. Vous voulez finir en Nouvelle-Zélande ?- C’est un joli endroit, cette Nouvelle-Zélande ?- Vous prenez le bon chemin pour le découvrir. Maintenant retournez là-bas avec les autres.- J’aime nager ici, je n’ai pas peur des requins. »Je prends beaucoup de plaisir à lire ce livre, qui me rappelle mes très récents débuts en Australie. C’est un texte léger, facile à lire (sauf les passages entre les amis de Nino qui restent incompréhensibles même avec un bon dictionnaire) qui parlera à tous les voyageurs qui ont un jour posé le pied en Australie.Je vous encourage à lire ce petit livre !Publié en Mai 2012 chez Text Publishing, AUD$12,95

  • Amanda Wells
    2019-05-11 18:35

    Definitely made me laugh out loud, and was a good snapshot into some Aussie-isms, and being a migrant in 1970s Sydney. Not entirely unproblematic- as you'd expect for a book of its time, but I fondly enjoyed it.

  • I. Roberts
    2019-05-08 11:26

    I enjoyed the humour. It reminded me of a simpler time.

  • Rik Schnabel
    2019-05-07 17:24

    What a fun read. A brilliant sneak peak into the Australian culture of old.

  • Simon McKenzie
    2019-05-14 18:44

    I really enjoyed everything up to the last chapter - a light, but very funny look at Australian language and culture in the '50s.What I didn't enjoy was the last chapter, when it turned into a piece of propaganda, ending with a call to "New Australians" to assimilate.

  • Helen
    2019-05-10 17:47

    Great book and every new Australian - and Australian - should read the last chapter a few times to truly understand the Australian character.

  • Kirsty Leishman
    2019-05-16 10:33

    "Australians like giving people tea and advice. The tea is always very good, and sometimes the advice too."They're a Weird Mob is a fish-out-of-water story, where Nino Culotta, an Italian journalist, is sent by his boss to report on the people and customs of Australia, a country to which many Italians emigrated after World War II. While it was first received as a 'snapshot of the immigrant experience' in Australia, effectively it's an Anglo-Australian's version of the post-war immigrant experience. This renders the character of Nino a happy-go-lucky chap, cheerfully dealing with the racism he encounters on public transport (plus ça change, hein?) and not taking any offence at the 'jokes' directed his way by hard-drinking, hard-working Australians.Overall, it's a book of its time: it clearly tries to foster understanding between the dominant Anglo-Australian male culture and newly arrived immigrants. It seeks to demonstrate how bewildering Australian vernacular could be for new Australians, and it highlights the contribution of immigrant culture-- notably strategies for eating spaghetti. Throughout, They're a Weird Mob offers advice to immigrants for the best way to assimilate into the dominant culture. Nearly sixty years after its publication, the dominant discourse of assimilation jars, as does the absence of any reference to indigenous culture and the general attitude towards women; still, there are frequent laughs to be had as Nino navigates the puzzling metaphors of Australian English on his journey to 'naturalisation'.

  • Rosie
    2019-05-02 17:33

    John O'Grady (Nino Culotta) is and will always be my favourite author for very good reason. His words can pull me out of any rut and leave me laughing out loud. With such a beautiful way of speaking and "built like a brick sh!thouse," Nino had gone to the very best schools in Italy to learn how to properly speak English. This works in Nino's favour when his boss decides to send Nino to Australia to see what their people are really like. The problem is that English and Australian English are not two in the same. When Nino goes undercover and gets a job working as a new immigrant, he is ready to meet as many Australians as he possibly can, but when he converses with them, Nino realises he has no idea what they are talking about, and when he does understand their words, he doesn't know what they meant. Obscenities replaced by "Stone the bloody crows!" and toilet visits referred to as "Checking the horse" leave him stumped. Pretty soon Nino has Australians summed up in just four words: THEY'RE A WEIRD MOB!

  • Ron
    2019-05-15 12:45

    Taught me how to eat spaghetti the proper, Italian way.Later I found out that the book was actually written by an Irishman, and that real Italians over the age of five don't eat pasta that way at all.I read this because of the movie, which was about Sydney in a time when nothing on TV was about Australia except the news, and I had not long before found out that I didn't actually live in America, despite what my TV had so insistently implied. This revelation made, I was intrigued by this place I now knew I lived in, and more than a little proud that Graham Kennedy, that famous Melbourne person, was in the movie, and so therefore so was Melbourne, for about twelve seconds.Apart from that, it's a pretty lame and obvious "satire", and probably more than a little bit racist. Sort of like Chris Lilley's "Jonah from Tonga" but without the F-grenades.

  • Wendy
    2019-05-14 17:39

    They're a Weird Mob was such a delightful story to read. For being such a short story, i was very surprised at how long it took me to read. Basicallly, it's about an Italian, Nino, who works for an Italian magazine. He is sent to Australia to live and to write articles about living in Australia. As a new immigrant he soon discovers that the Australians have their own lingo and customs and he finds he either doesn't understand what is being said or he is totally misunderstood. Since the book is mostly written in Australian slang, it took me a very long time to read the slang but I'm so glad I did. This book is hilarious and any newcomer to Australia would especially relate to this story.

  • Terry
    2019-05-14 17:40

    The story of Nino Culottta who emigrates to Australia and his missadventures there in the land of English speakers (but not as he know it) Particularly funny are some of the scrapes he gets into due to his inappropriate use or inadequate knowledge of Australian slang. Though in Italy he was a journalist in Aus he gets a job as a builders labourer and this takes him into the heart of a family business with more hilarious scenes. A very funny book and there is a funny film of the same name that you could look out for.

  • Luka
    2019-05-06 10:30

    Anglo guy writes book. Wanks on about ocker utopia. Tells migrants how they should act. While pretending to be an Italian journalist.Despite this underlying premise, and the nauseating passages that touch on these themes, there are some funny and interesting insights into how (Anglo-)Australian men saw themselves in the 50s. And I also enjoyed the references to places that I was familiar with (a lot of it is set around Bankstown and Punchbowl).But as I said, the whole wogface thing. Just, no.

  • Paul
    2019-04-28 14:40

    Although I read this book some time ago, I vividly remember it was extremely funny. At times I found it difficult to read through the tears of laughter that kept cascading before my eyes. I believe the author well focuses on the differences between different people in a very humorous and benevolent way. I found it a very enjoyable read. I would like to read it again one day in the not too distant future.

  • Ali Shahandeh
    2019-05-16 13:54

    I just realised that Nino Culotta is the pen name of John O'Grady who is not really an Italian. Honestly it took a bit of sincerity of the book, yet I am going to recommend it to everyone who is after a light read and great insight to 1950's working class Australia. Funny, light- hearted and easy to relate to, perfect for the gloomy Sunday afternoon.

  • Ulrike
    2019-05-15 13:45

    Very Australian, excellent portrait of the Australian language (I only understood half of it!), and the concept of mateship. Nice background story to the author and how the book came about, too, which I won't divulge here. If you are interested in Australia, maybe moving and living here, it's a must read.

  • Monica
    2019-05-17 13:37

    This was a very funny and accurate look into the Australian way of speaking and how confusing it must be for new Australians.I really enjoyed the character of Nino and his attempts to fit in even when he had no idea what was going on. I've never actually read a book about an outsider's view of Australia before (even though this was written by an Aussie) so that was really interesting.