Read Hattie and the Fox by Mem Fox Patricia Mullins Online

hattie-and-the-fox

I can see a nose and two eyes in the bushes!" cries Hattie. But nobody is listening. "I can see a nose, two eyes, two ears, two legs, and a body in the bushes!" cries Hattie. But no one is paying a bit of attention. Not goose. Not pig. Not horse. Not cow. She tries again and again to warn her friends of danger, but nobody listens to Hattie. That is, until they all realizeI can see a nose and two eyes in the bushes!" cries Hattie. But nobody is listening. "I can see a nose, two eyes, two ears, two legs, and a body in the bushes!" cries Hattie. But no one is paying a bit of attention. Not goose. Not pig. Not horse. Not cow. She tries again and again to warn her friends of danger, but nobody listens to Hattie. That is, until they all realize that what Hattie is saying is true!...

Title : Hattie and the Fox
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780689716119
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 32 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Hattie and the Fox Reviews

  • June
    2018-12-06 01:12

    One of my favorite picture books to use in a chicken or farm story time. Has been very well received. 5/9/11Tonight one of my regular toddler attendees, had a grand time repeating the animals responses to Hattie's pronouncements. One of the older kids ran to get our fox puppet for the story. 4/10/12My story time is turning into a toddler time and this might be too long for them :( 4/22/14Worked well with my young group today, but it was a smaller group. 3/31/15Didn't work as well this year.

  • Mrs. Lindsay's Class
    2018-11-27 22:04

    Mrs. Lindsay's class said:"I liked the story because the pictures were pretty." (Paris)"I liked the book because it was funny." (Ar'shon)"I liked the story because it had a cow in it." (Jamya)"I liked the story because it had a fox and a cow in it." (Jarion)"I liked the story because it had a funny ending." (Mrs. Lindsay)"I liked it because the fox jumped out of the bushes." (Jibril)"I liked it because the fox got scared away!" (Dallas)

  • midnightfaerie
    2018-12-11 23:14

    We got a themed box of books from the library about Farms and this was one of the books. We loved this book. The illustrations were bright and colorful and the story was engaging enough to keep both my 5 yr old and twin 3 yr olds interested. Probably a level 1 reading level and so good for beginner readers as well. A big win in our family.

  • Mary
    2018-12-13 01:11

    Read-Aloud Revival Recommendation for June Picture Books.This is an adorable book, and it will always hold a special place in my heart because my newly-minted 4-year-old could "read" most of the book from memory. He totally surprised me one day by letting me know he would read to me. And he nailed it. So fun.

  • Ally Lindley
    2018-11-14 00:19

    I feel bad for Hattie in this book because she is merely trying to save her friends, yet they don't care to listen. However, I do like the book and I like how it emphasizes that is is important to listen.

  • Stephanie
    2018-12-07 19:18

    A good book for repetition and patterns. Great to discuss the ending and why the animals stopped repeating their phrases.

  • Sharlene Hall
    2018-12-06 21:08

    Spoiler (lol): Thank goodness for the loud cow!

  • Margie Kunka
    2018-11-16 17:09

    I read this book to my first graders to promote curiosity and excitement. We love Hattie and her adventure.

  • Kate Sanders
    2018-11-29 16:56

    This book was very repetitive. It seemed like the chicken's friends didn't really care what she had to say. Everyone ended up being safe from the fox thanks to the cow.

  • Sam Dawson
    2018-11-14 20:03

    What's hiding in the bushes ? The only one who cared was the hen. Will the other animals be in danger for not caring? Keep reading to see what's hiding in the bushes.

  • Cat
    2018-11-16 01:11

    A classic. The ending is fun for daughter and mom.

  • Mary
    2018-11-26 00:00

    A hen, Hattie, is the only barnyard animal who notices a fox in the bushes. Young listeners will appreciate the repetitive text in this gently humorous cumulative tale. A timeless picture book classic that can be enjoyed one-on-one or in a preschool story time. Also this would be a good story to dramatize.

  • Allison Weiler
    2018-11-26 01:11

    Title: Hattie and the FoxAuthor: Mem FoxIllustrator: Patricia MullinaGenre: Predictable Book Theme(s): AnimalsOpening line/sentence: Hattie was a big black hen. One morning she looked up and said,“Goodness gracious me! I can see a nose in the bushes!”Brief Book Summary: Hattie the hen is startled by something in the bushes. Despite her barnyard friends ignoring her cry, Hattie relentlessly warns them of the danger. When the barnyard friends realize the truth, they must work together to stay safe. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: Mary Quattlebaum (Children's Literature) Mullins' collage style creates large, expressive figures that complement Fox's text, which rely on repetition of key elements to build drama and enhance beginning reading skills. Be prepared for a surprise ending!Professional Recommendation/Review #2: CCBC (Cooperative Children's Book Center Choices, 1987) In the bushes Hattie the Hen first sees a nose, then two eyes, then two ears, and so on, but none of the other barnyard animals heed her warning until the entire fox is visible. A wonderful combination of predictability and surprise succeeds as an original cumulative tale. The colorful collage illustrations show an expert use of form and space, and though they depict the same setting and the same animals again and again, no two illustrations look the same.Response to Two Professional Reviews: These two professional reviews both point out the collage illustrations by Patricia Mullina, and how no two illustrations are the same. These illustrations add to the importance of the key literary elements that allow children to build on their reading skills. These reviews appear to recommend this colorful, and predictable, book to all younger children. Evaluation of Literary Elements: Mem Fox incorporates an extraordinary amount of literary element into this short picture book, in order to grab every young child’s attention. The elaborate collage illustrations make up for the minimal plot. However, the repetitive plot allows for children to expand on their reading skills and Children become invested in this short story, rooting for Hattie the hen and hoping her barnyard friends listen to her. Consideration of Instructional Application: Hattie and the Fox is a great story to use when teaching children to incorporate different voices for different characters. This can be done with the book, or as a play. This story can also be used to test comprehension with sequencing, when specific events occurred and which character said what line. Finally, this story can be incorporated into a science lesson to learn about different animals on a barn and how they interact with one another.

  • Brandon
    2018-12-09 01:23

    Mem and the Fox by Hattie Fox is a very repetitious outing for Australia's one and only author. Like all her other books, there's one thing that happens over and over again until it stops. In this, there's a hen that sees a fox in some bushes. Even after it's very clear that there's a fox that wants to eat her, she stands there describing it like all the other animals can't see that it's a goddamn fox as well. Those other animals just don't give a shit though, and for good reason. They have a horse on their side, and horses can kick the shit out of anyone. Ms. Fox throws a curve-ball in the story when (view spoiler)[ it is the cow, not the horse, that sends the fox away. (hide spoiler)]In the end, all of the animals have PTSD, and the hen is like "Told you bitches".*/Caliban Cove["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

  • Renee
    2018-11-18 22:20

    Summary: Hattie, a big black hen, discovers a fox in the bushes, which creates varying reactions in the other barnyard animals.Good for preschool story time. Cumulative tale with repetition and suspense. Hattie tries to warn the other farm animals about something she sees in the bushes. First she sees a nose in the bushes. The other animals say things like "Who cares" "So what", etc. Hattie goes on to say that she sees a nose and two eyes in the bushes. The other animals repeat their same phrases, not caring at all. By the end, Hattie sees a nose, two eyes, two ears, two legs, and a tail in the bushes. It's a fox!" Now the other animals run in fear. "But the cow said "MOO!" so loudly that the fox was frightened and ran away." Themes: farm animals, bird, chickens/hens, foxes Use with: I had a Rooster song Fox theme story time: The gingerbread man, the three little pigs

  • Jessica
    2018-12-07 01:24

    My 6 year old read this book to me basically on her own tonight. Thrilled! The illustrations are lovely and I love the repetition that helps her see words multiple times for practice. However, instead of being a dull repetition it helps build suspense in the story. Sweet, fun, with a twist of funny at the end!MOO!Read it and you'll get it. HA HA HA!!!

  • Lindsi Porter
    2018-12-07 19:06

    This book is about a hen named Hattie, who sees first a nose, the eyes, the ears, the body, the legs, and the tail of a fox adding one at a time. Each time the goose, pig, sheep, horse, and cow don’t listen to Hattie and act very uninterested in what she’s saying. Eventually the fox comes out and Hattie flies into a tree. Then the other animals get very scared, but the cow moos so loudly it scares the fox away. The pictures in this book are very unique and fun to look at. I think this book has a lot of repetition in it, which allows for a lot of participation from younger children while they’re being read to. The children can also look in the bush to see what Hattie is seeing.

  • Lindsi
    2018-11-25 00:11

    This book is about a hen named Hattie, who sees first a nose, the eyes, the ears, the body, the legs, and the tail of a fox adding one at a time. Each time the goose, pig, sheep, horse, and cow don’t listen to Hattie and act very uninterested in what she’s saying. Eventually the fox comes out and Hattie flies into a tree. Then the other animals get very scared, but the cow moos so loudly it scares the fox away. The pictures in this book are very unique and fun to look at. I think this book has a lot of repetition in it, which allows for a lot of participation from younger children while they’re being read to. The children can also look in the bush to see what Hattie is seeing.

  • Stef Rozitis
    2018-11-23 21:01

    I liked a few things about this book for example that it was an enormous black hen not a little red one for a change. I like the ending because it sort of comes out of nowhere (but in a fair way, not deus ex machina). Repetition seems like cheating by authors but children seem to like it, especially when it changes later on.I have had a lot of success reading this at group time using puppets or plastic farm animals or an easel to draw the nose, eyes, ears, etc page by page to make a FOX. So this book is successful and popular with small people!

  • Rebecca
    2018-11-17 19:00

    Mem Fox managed to write about animals that are stupider than the cow in "A Particular Cow". (view spoiler)[Hattie spots something in the bushes. "Who cares?" "So what?" Yeah, sheep and horse respectively, who cares if there's someone spying on us?You can see a nose, two eyes, two ears, a body and two legs in the bushes. WELL, THE FOX IN THE PICTURE IS A TINY BIT OBVIOUS, NO?If that cow hadn't been there to moo the fox away, then the fox might have eaten the dumbass animals and Darwin would be so proud. (hide spoiler)]

  • Angela
    2018-11-15 22:58

    Author: Mem FoxGrade level: K-2Content: farm animalsThis story is about a couple of farm animals. They are enjoying their day when a rooster spots something in the bushes and informs the others. The others do not seem to care. Slowly the rooster begins to see more and more characteristics that resemble a fox, and still the other animals do not pay mind to him. Finally the fox comes out of the bushes and attempts to attack the rooster. The rooster flies around yelling and alerting the others that it was indeed a fox. All the animals panic.

  • Stacy Slater
    2018-12-03 21:07

    When Hattie the hen sees a nose in the bushes, none of the other farm animals is interested until the nose proves to be attached to a fox.This is a predictable pattern book for preschoolers and early readers, with wonderfully expressive illustrations. (The pig has especially smug features.) However, the ending, where the fox is scared away by the decibel level of the cow's "moo" is weak. Despite the weak ending, Hattie and the Fox would make a nice comparison lesson when paired with Chicken Little or The Boy Who Cried Wolf.

  • Christina
    2018-11-18 21:59

    I discovered this book during a stop over in the Hong Kong airport, when my 2-and-change son started playing with a 3-and-change Australian-living-in-Shanghai girl. Her mum read it to them when they needed a break from tearing around in circles. Once we got home I ordered it. The progress of Hattie's discovery of the fox in the bushes combined with the repetition of the blase responses from the other farm animals are both funny and suspense-building, the denouement is dramatic but violence-free, and I love love love the tissue paper collage illustrations.

  • Serge Smagarinsky
    2018-11-17 20:16

    You know that picture book you've read to your child so many times that they can "read" it off by heart? For my daughter, this is THAT book. The repetition of the various animals reactions and cumulative structure revealing more an more of the fox build great anticipation before a surprise, humorous ending.If you look closely at the illustrations, you will find that they are a collage of coloured tissue paper. Pretty nifty, huh?

  • Sabrina
    2018-12-06 22:17

    Excellent book. I was able to think of all sorts of activites that I could use with the book. I was alos able to find lots of great activities on the internet for the story. My teacher made it a 5 day unit building on prior knowledge each day. She used it as a retell-reread activity, they wrote poems another day, they identified the rhyming words in the story the next day and the last day they made the characters in the story. Lots of fun.

  • Brenda Cregor
    2018-11-16 20:16

    This story has elements of CHICKEN LITTLE and LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD, all rolled into one.Though the story is not surprising, children love the voices which can be used when reading the character's responses out loud, and then they begin to shout out the various fox parts Hattie sees, in order, by the end. So fun!

  • Laura
    2018-11-19 19:13

    I read this as part of my Kindergarten Mem Fox unit. I liked it, my students liked it, but it wasn't our favorite. The animals reactions to Hattie's Goodness Gracious Me! gets a bit repetitive. As a follow up, we colored a picture of Hattie and the fox and then covered the fox with a 'bush' of green tears of paper. A cute activity that also roped in the illustrator's technique.

  • Amory Blaine
    2018-11-11 21:57

    This is a very repetitive book about a hen who spots a fox in the bushes near her farm. She doesn't know it's a fox, though, until he springs at her.The repetition and level of suspense in this book is great for younger kids. Older ones, on the other hand, may find the animals' responses frustrating.

  • Esther
    2018-11-15 00:17

    Hattie and the Fox is a great book to do with your students as a play. The different animals in the story can pose as parts, and they all have roles throughout the story. It works great in encouraging them to follow along with the story, and showing emphasis and emotion as they read the words. You just can't get enough of Mem Fox.

  • A. Kuhlii
    2018-11-20 19:21

    Great toddler book. For older kids, can do this as a call and response/choral reading with the kids--give each kid an animal card and have them respond "Good grief!" "Oh no!" etc. For the last time, they turn the cards over and on the other side of the card is the last (different) exclamation of the animals. Large groups could be separated into geese group, horse group, etc.