Read A Lucky American Childhood by Paul Engle Albert E. Stone Online

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More than any other individual, Paul Engle was the spirited force behind the creative writing workshops now so abundant in America. His indomitable nature, enthusiasm, and great persuasive powers, coupled with his distinguished reputation as a poet, loomed large behind the founding of the influential Iowa Writers' Workshop.a"A Lucky American Childhood" will appeal to peoplMore than any other individual, Paul Engle was the spirited force behind the creative writing workshops now so abundant in America. His indomitable nature, enthusiasm, and great persuasive powers, coupled with his distinguished reputation as a poet, loomed large behind the founding of the influential Iowa Writers' Workshop.a"A Lucky American Childhood" will appeal to people with memories of the small-town America that Paul Engle describes with such affectionate realism and to all those interested in the roots of this renowned man of letters."...

Title : A Lucky American Childhood
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780877455400
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 228 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

A Lucky American Childhood Reviews

  • Sarah
    2018-08-27 20:10

    I finished this a few weeks ago, but I'm just now finally getting around to writing about it. I love memoirs & I love Iowa, so Engle's recounting of his childhood in Cedar Rapids during the early 20th century was absolutely wonderful for me. Plus I'm kind of envious hearing how his childhood as a horseman's son led to him becoming a Rhodes Scholar and spending time in Europe on the eve of WWII, and eventually founding the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. The best thing is that, unlike listening to an elderly neighbor's painful recounting of their now dim childhood memories, Engle is a gifted writer and strings along an interesting collection of vignettes. While the chapters are mostly self-contained and only somewhat chronological, somehow it all seems to fit together in an unexpectedly perfect way. If you like this sort of thing, you could do a lot worse.

  • Trudy
    2018-09-15 18:07

    A memoir by Paul Engle, who directed the Iowa Writers Workshop for decades and also founded the Iowa International Writers Workshop. This book tells of his childhood in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, back in the days when some people thought cars were a passing fad. The book is full of imagery and descriptions of things of all the senses; vivid memories of what that Engle missed as the world modernized and became more "antiseptic". But his use of imagery is indicative of his status as a poet; prose is not his "native language", and since there was not really a plot or story line (except a few anecdotes in some chapters), I found the reading a bit laborious. But it did make Cedar Rapids, as he described the rich diversity that constituted it, more than just "that blue collar city to the north", which seems to be the Iowa City opinion.

  • Marty
    2018-09-16 20:10

    Set about a generation older than I am, but in the area in which I grew up, this book resonated very well with me. A pleasant reminiscence. I thought his poetry background enhanced his prose, making it very rich and evocative, as though he were savoring the words.

  • Lauren Little
    2018-09-20 20:10

    This book is about a guy who grew up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa in the 30's. It's really good, and it reminds me of the scenes of Iowa along with stories from my family.