Read Porn Generation: How Social Liberalism Is Corrupting Our Future by Ben Shapiro Online

porn-generation-how-social-liberalism-is-corrupting-our-future

Shapiro captures a generation through first-person reporting, interviews with refugees from the porn industry, conversations with psychologist, educators, and students, and a telling cultural critique....

Title : Porn Generation: How Social Liberalism Is Corrupting Our Future
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780895260161
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 232 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Porn Generation: How Social Liberalism Is Corrupting Our Future Reviews

  • Robert Beveridge
    2018-08-28 21:01

    Ben Shapiro, Porn Generation: How Social Liberalism Is Corrupting Our Future (Regnery, 2005)When a book is blurbed by both Ann Coulter and Laura Schlesinger, that's as good as having your cover be a portion of one of those old maps that says, in the middle of the ocean, “here be dragons”. Anyone attempting to read such a treatise must immediately know that one must gird one's loins and prepare for a deeply distressing experience. Ben Shapiro's Porn Generation satisfies-- no pun intended-- on all counts.The book's most glaring deficiency is that Shapiro condemns sex researcher Alfred Kinsey for being, in the words of Daniel Flynn, “a charlatan who embarked upon research to confirm his pre-drawn conclusions”(20), and then embarks on exactly the same quest himself. He sets the scene by outlining a moral standard (without footnotes, of course, though the book does contain copious footnotes), and then writes to that standard, grasping at whatever straws are necessary to advance his own viewpoint, no matter how questionable-- or outright ludicrous-- those straws may be. He never thought to question the statistic he cites that one in three brides in 1946 were pregnant when they wed? And if he did, why doesn't he at least mention it?The footnotes themselves make for tremendous reading, better than the book itself. They read like a primer of places to go to get your daily fill of religionist nonsense. Is there truly anyone who would cite worldnet daily with a straight face? There is-- Ben Shapiro. But then, this should come as no surprise; the moral standard that Shapiro would hold us all to is, if course, the Christian moral standard. None other could possibly be valid.Standing against this Christian moral standard is an enemy Shapiro defines as “social liberals.”All social liberals, of course, have the same mindset, the same agenda, and the same set of beliefs. All social liberals, for example, are proselytizers of sexual freedom, while simultaneously being fervently anti-gun and anti-smoking. It actually made me take out my gun permit and look at it to make sure it hadn't disappeared while I was reading this book and smoking my way through a pack of Maverick 100s. Thankfully, Shapiro's parallel universe, where “social liberals” march in lockstep and have as their sole desire to topple the moral foundations of this supposedly Christian nation, exists only in his mind.Shapiro, as I intimated before, is also all too willing to simply take his sources at their word, never questioning whether they might, in fact, be slanting the truth, or not quite as cognizant of it as they think they are. Shapiro, citing wingnut Michelle Malkin, seems to think that, for example, self-injury is some sort of new fad. (The article of Malkin's he cites-- found on the wonderfully amusing townhall.com website-- is even called “The new youth craze: self-mutilation”.) A quick Amazon search on self-mutilation, or one on cutting, taking all of fifteen seconds, would have put paid to that idea pretty quickly. (It should be noted that Shapiro also publishes at townhall.com. Better yet, he cites his own articles. Now there's a source for you!) He also likes to use hyperbole for the effect hyperbole is usually used for, fearmongering. “If you spend any amount of time on the Internet, it's difficult not to find yourself in the midst of a hard-core porn site...” (171). Funny, I've been an IT professional for almost fifteen years now, and I've never “found myself in the midst of” a hard-core porn site when I haven't wanted to be there. Between my job, my research, the occasional game, booking trips, and the many other hundreds of things I do on the Internet, it's not an unreasonable assumption to say I'm on the Internet seventy hours a week, if not more. I drop by porn websites once every three years or so. Never by accident. So what?, you may ask. You're an IT professional. You know how these things work. Well, my mom is in her seventies and still can't set the time on the VCR. How many times has she been tricked into visiting a hardcore porn site? I'll take “zero” for two hundred, Alex.I can't call this book entirely worthless; you can use the footnotes and the bibliography to compile a pretty comprehensive list of stuff you can use for your amusement when you feel like laughing at people who really believe that, to paraphrase the title of the townhall article Shapiro authored that he cites in Chapter One, the radical homosexual agenda is destroying American standards. As a piece of nonfiction, it's a joke; this is a two-hundred-thirty-two page op-ed piece at best, with every page dedicated to twisting and misinterpreting facts. (For, of course, no interpretation but Shapiro's could possibly have any merit.) As a joke, however, it's not funny enough to waste your time with. That there are people out there who would read this tripe and take it to heart pains me. If you must read it, please do so with enough of your critical thinking skills intact to at least realize that there are vastly different conclusions to be drawn from the facts Shapiro presents.A thoroughly loathsome effort. (zero)

  • Louis
    2018-09-14 17:12

    A very insightful look into a nation that has become desensitized to the most corrupt and degrading trends in our society. Shapiro is a very young writer but has wisdom beyond his years.

  • Idrees
    2018-09-01 16:03

    One is part of the whole, and the actions of individuals do effect the fabric of society. Of course we have to have laws to protect and govern the state, society, and the citizens; but there has to be more than just the law forcing what is right and preventing wrong doings. Everybody is unique, so everybody has his/her own moral code.I would want to do lots of horrifying things, but I don't; because not just that my actions will have bad consequences, but also if I get caught, I will face punishment (the law), and if I do not get caught and die, God will judge me and I will get punished. Those who have slaughtered and burned hundreds and thousands of people and got away with it in this life, will show up for trail in the hereafter. It is correct; religion imposes lots of restrictions on freedom, but it makes us act in a certain way that if everybody acted that way, things will be good for every one overall.

  • John
    2018-09-13 15:00

    Not a bad book in and of itself, but I had a couple major issues with it:1. It's too dated.Considering how fast modern society evolves and new trends come and go, PORN GENERATION simply isn't current enough to reflect the American landscape of today. The book focuses squarely on the years I was in high school and college (late 1990's, early 2000's), and I'm sure many of the things Ben Shapiro criticizes in this book will seem pretty toothless by today's standards. I mean, what reason is there to go after Britney Spears now that we have Lady Gaga, what reason to complain about FRIENDS now that everyone is obsessed with GAME OF THRONES? Why worry about Madonna and Britney's kiss on MTV now that TEEN VOGUE has published a guide to doing anal?2. It's too obvious.An alternate title for this book could have been THE SUN IS HOT AND OTHER SURPRISING OBSERVATIONS. Hey, did you know Marilyn Manson promotes nihilism? That rap music objectifies women? That girls' teen magazines often contain frank sex talk? That Madonna was both a bad role model and a fashion disaster? That Eminem writes violent lyrics? That Lindsay Lohan is unstable? Did you know heavy metal music often contains Satanic references and imagery? That Ozzy Osboune was a total drunk? Did you know college kids have too much sex and wish they could have even more?If any of this surprises you, can I please get the address of the rock you live under? Maybe we could be roomies. Then again, if you live under a rock, why are you reading PORN GENERATION? Are you trying to make yourself angry over how rotten the world has gotten? How are you going to actually USE any of this information? Ah, but perhaps you have kids and are trying to educate yourself on the dangers in store for them. Well, sorry, but this book ain't gonna cut it (see Issue 1).PORN GENERATION is a well-intentioned book that simply no longer retains any relevance it once had. I commend Shapiro for his strong moral stance, but I think he goes too far in some of his criticisms. I think it's fair to call Britney Spears "slutty", but flat-out calling her a "whore" strikes me as both mean and inaccurate. Saying Christina Aguilera has no talent means you know nothing about singing. Her songs may be total crap, but the girl's got pipes. Shapiro would do well to realize that subjective criticisms weaken the overall argument he is trying to make, which is that American pop culture has become quite toxic in recent decades.Newsflash, everybody!

  • Erin Martin
    2018-09-22 19:16

    I can't do this anymore. It's boring, outdated and just annoying. I am a conservative republican and I'm definitely not politically correct not do I like political correctness by any means. But I don't respect outright rudeness. The author is extremely rude and name calls just for the sake of it. You can present your arguments and get your point across without bashing people. This book really just seems like a bad essay thrown together last minute by a college kids that hadn't started a paper that was due the next day. There's no real organization and no real point. Like, oh our culture is obsessed with sex? Tell me something I don't know please. We all know this. But he also exaggerates the extent to how obsessed with sex everyone is- or maybe I'm just naive. This is not what I expected and not what I wanted from this book.

  • Jennifer Weeks Ph.D
    2018-08-31 18:16

    This book was not what I expected. It is extremely conservative and judgmental. As a therapist who works with out of control sexual behavior and pornography addiction, the language in this book really bothers me. To call people immoral and deviant shames them which adds to the problem and does nothing to help the problem.

  • Jackson Reynolds
    2018-09-05 17:59

    Whinily acerbic, this corybantic polemic explores in greatly unnecessary detail the elements of modern culture which the author finds deeply objectionable (which, it turns out, is pretty much everything). Shapiro’s torpid prose is a thin, manically polished veneer, clearly concealing a deep sea of all manner of repression, and his hysterical prudishness and unashamed enthusiasm for outright censorship are so sensationalist and backward as to make Ted Cruz look like an unfettered libertine in comparison.

  • Denise Spicer
    2018-09-15 14:02

    Well written, informative overview of the subtle conquest of America over the decades by the sexual revolution and the chilling consequences on the victims of porn. Parents, educators, and religious leaders should definitely read this book to become aware of the problem. The author concludes with a chapter “Taking A Stand” which offers suggestions of what to do to solve the problem.

  • Wendi
    2018-08-31 18:55

    Like another reviewer said, it is dated. I wondered how the pornography addiction rates in 2005 compare to 2017, as well as the video game addiction rate and social media addiction rate in 2017. Movies and TV are oversexualized, and of questionable morality. Once I became a parent I noticed. A more relevant book on the current social liberalism would probably be one about college campuses and the media, such as Milo Yiannopoulis' book "Dangerous" or "Unlearning Liberty" by Gregg Lukianoff. Impressed that Ben Shapiro wrote this book at such a young age. His contemporary observations of his peer group was interesting. I did not agree with everything but it yielded a few books I will look into.

  • Mahulena Kuklová
    2018-08-24 19:54

    This book has to be taken with a grain of salt.There are some pretty good points, especially at the beginning (the psychological effects of living in a society where the traditional moral values have been ripped apart), I think a lot of people can identify with that.After the first, say, 40-50 pages, the book turns into a long list of "who's to blame for the moral decline" and a lot of the judgements are (in my opinion) off. Kate Winslet getting naked for Leo DiCaprio in Titanic certainly didn't raise the number of teen pregnancies.Nevertheless, this book is an interesting read for both social conservatives and social libertarians. Regardless of what you believe, you should always listen to what the other side has to say and evaluate their point of view.

  • Krista
    2018-08-27 21:07

    It's always a refreshing feeling when you think you have 40% left of a book and then find out that the rest of it is notes and references. It's like 'woohoo! I finished faster than I thought.' This is especially true when it's a book that you are not particularly enjoying.I did not particularly enjoy this book.I adore Ben Shapiro...when he's talking...I don't particularly enjoy his writing. This book is, for lack of a better word, histrionic. Not that what he is saying is wrong, in many cases, it's just how he chooses to say it that I don't particularly like. I guess I can only take so many adjectives like 'horrendous, vile, catastrophic, abhorrent' applied to one fact before I roll my eyes and wish we could just move on.Again, this is not to say that hat he has written is not true. It's obvious that he did a lot of research going into the book (30% of the kindle edition is just notes, for crying out loud), but it seems like the book was written from a more emotional journalistic perspective than from a critically reasoned and scholarly perspective. I don't particularly enjoy that style. On the other hand, this was written when Ben was 21, so that youth may be what I am picking up on. Finally, I didn't enjoy this book because I found it extremely disheartening. He is right when he says that Hollywood and advertising use sex to sell their products. As much as we have improved the lives of women in America we still use their bodies to sell stuff. It's disgusting.

  • Daniel Mulec
    2018-09-07 20:58

    Way too conservative for my taste, even listening to it as an audiobook was hard. While thanks to The Daily Wire and The Ben Shapiro Show I hold him in highest regard, this book is definitely one of the worst books I've encountered in a long while. But on the positive side, it shows his evolution over the past 15 years, as now he's not as incredibly conservative anymore as he used to be.

  • Luke Cawte
    2018-09-02 14:09

    Starts of strong and with great promise, but then quickly becomes monotonous. In the first few chapters Ben Shapiro raises great questions about the responsibility of parents, the role of government intervention into the moral standards of its citizens, and how much hollywood has been involved in the shaping of world views... But unfortunately 80% of the book spends its time going over in detail the moral decay of disney princesses, the lyrics of their songs and why they're terrible role models, rather than spending more time on how all of this affects, and changes the beliefs of the viewers and listeners of said entertainment. While mostly tedious, this book does have some great gems hidden amongst the clay. Exploring the fact that right after the Bill Clinton sex scandal, the rates of STDs spread by oral sex among teenagers increased dramatically... Was extremely interesting, showing the high correlation between the declining moral standards of leaders, and in a very real and tangible way, the views and actions of others. What's not interesting is spending chapters upon chapters, going over every horrible and stupid thing that Madonna and Brittany Spears ever did! By doing that he has unfortunately dated his own book, as a lot of the references to songs and current celebrity scandals just won't have the same relevance in the years to come. Only a small part of this book is about why society has plummeted morally, how it factually impacts people, and what to do about it. That part was great! ...But getting through the rest of the book was a chore! Missed opportunity.

  • Mary
    2018-08-25 14:10

    A very interesting analysis of our culture today, especially the culture of my generation.

  • Benjamin Lupton
    2018-09-15 15:54

    Well worth reading. A comprehensive and detailed accounting and judgement of the decay of moral standards, media and philosophy in the USA, over the past decades. If you've ever wondered how millennials came to be so lost, this book will inform and delight.It gets 4 stars despite being essential reading, because although the accountability is flawless. The judgments leave a lot to be desired for secularists, as the frame of reference for many judgments is merely - god. It would be nice if there was more arguments as to why certain things are bad, as some feels like throwing the baby out with the bathwater. As there seems like for some things, there is probably a secular silver lining in there somewhere, rather than straight up condemnation. Despite this, it is the best accounting of our spoiled culture I have found. And the judgements are valuable to hear as a starting point for further explanation. It is well worth the read, and I will recommend it to anyone in the culture war.For follow ups, Stefan Molyneaux or whatever his last name is, is worthwhile for insights on why many of the judgements make sense.

  • Michael Hermann
    2018-09-18 17:21

    Wasn't sure what to think of this book when I started, but as I read through the book, the author made some valid points that really got me thinking. This book may not be for everyone because it will get some people upset by what they perceive as prudish attitudes, but at the same time, you have to wonder if sex doesn't influence people so much, then why do companies spend millions of dollars to use sexual suggestions to influence consumers?

  • Michael
    2018-08-27 16:12

    This book was extremely boring ! Not surprising considering I think Ben Shapiro is a robot. This book is 90% statistics 9% interesting side notes and 1% poor attempts at humor. Ben Shapiro is NOT a comedian and he should stop trying to be funny. Its just awful. But over all a very educational book. These are serious issues that require much more attention and discussion.

  • Brent
    2018-09-02 13:56

    I'm not sure we didn't already know about most of this, but it's still a shocking description of what much of our society has become. The book itself should be R-rated--there's a warning on the cover.

  • David Delmar
    2018-09-20 16:08

    Unless you concede Shapiro the premise that sex is a deeply significant moral issue (and you won't, unless you're a monotheist), his entire argument is empty. The entire book rests on that shaky foundation.

  • Caleb Allen
    2018-09-09 15:09

    Is an R rated book, but I am as disgraced as the author is by this infection of porn.

  • Haleigh
    2018-09-21 19:53

    Some points are bit of a stretch, few dud chapters but mostly very true and interesting.

  • Rachel
    2018-09-21 17:01

    Very informative, not boring, and inspirational.

  • Corey
    2018-09-21 20:58

    Sad the effect pornography has on our culture and especially what this means for future generations, it is definitely not what I want our generation to be known for. I pray, yes pray for change.

  • MADCAT
    2018-08-30 18:19

    If I could give less than 1 star - I would.