Read Poems by Elizabeth Bishop Online

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This volume represents the collected poems of an important American poet, Elizabeth Bishop. Her first book, North & South, won the Houghton Mifflin Poetry Award and seldom has a new collection of poems been greeted with such critical enthusiasm....

Title : Poems
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 4904713
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 95 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Poems Reviews

  • Christopher
    2018-07-22 18:12

    The 1955 volume POEMS reissued Elizabeth Bishop's debut collection North and South, but it also contained an entirely new collection titled A Cold Spring. One of the best places to get this material is the Library of America volume (ISBN 1598530178) that contains Bishop's complete poems and prose with a choice of letters, but I have found it interesting to slowly examine Bishop's collections on their own.North and South was published in 1946, but of the poems predate the war (or at least American involvement in it) and reflect Bishop's development as a poet through the 1930s and very early 1940s. From the very first poem, "The Map", we find Bishop's distinctive concern with describing specific scenes in detail, that then give way to some kind of universal, transcendental experience. After various musings on the printers' layout of the eponymous map, the poem ends: "Mapped waters are more quiet than the land is, / lending the land their waves' own conformation: / and Norway's hare runs south in agitation, / profiles investigate the sea, where land is. / Are they assigned, or can the countries pick their colors? / -- What suits the characters or the native waters best. / Topography displays no favorites; North's as near as West. / More delicate than the historians' are the map-makers' colors."And the best poems in North and South continue this style. "Roosters", acclaimed by Robert Lowell as the best work by an American female poet, goes from describing the dawn chorus around Bishop's home to meditations on tribal violence and religious salvation. "The Fish" recounts a victory during an angling trip, only to ultimately make a point about how insignificant such victories are. And there's humour here to, such as in "Large Bad Picture" where Bishop meditates on her great-uncle's painting, only eliptically revealing how bad it is.Only Bishop's dabbling in surrealism in "The Weed" and "The Man-Moth" marks this collection with a certain immaturity. But still, this is an impressive debut, and Bishop's poetry has a music to it that should appeal to a wide public. The only difficulty comes in reviewing it: Bishop's poetry is so concerned with a twist somewhere towards the end of a poem that her poems can only be quoted in full.The second collection, A Cold Spring, consists of poems written in the 1940s and early 1950s. Here too we Bishop's careful eye for detail, basing a whole poem on a pensive contemplation of one small object or scene, but it also includes a number of striking poems based on turbulent personal relationships. "O Breath" and "Insomnia" are nighttime meditations on problems with a lover. "View of the Capitol of the Library of Congress" is an amusing jab at politics from a literary intellectual. Some of the poems in A Cold Spring are among my favourite English-language poems, but it's a pity that in a review one cannot quote at length those many lines that have so touched your heart.

  • Will McGrath
    2018-08-11 19:47

    I don't know enough about reading poetry to weigh in with an educated opinion. I can say that I found a number of the pieces in this collection captivating, and others less so. I'll be interested to see how "North & South" (her debut collection, from 1946) compares with her final collection, "Geography III", which won the 1977 National Book Critics Circle Award (and which I plan to read in a few weeks). I did find reading Bishop before sitting down to my own projects to be a useful practice. Forces the brain to sloooow down and return to the word-by-word level. Her style - very deliberately non-confessional, unlike that of her friend and celebrated contemporary, Robert Lowell - works from a position of measured, observational remove. Very few humans make their way into the pages of this collection. Bishop is content to simply watch, and occasionally touch, the physical and natural world. Only then will she tilt her subject into an unexpected and illuminating new perspective.

  • Chris
    2018-07-23 17:00

    There's a reason Bishop is a modern classic. Her writing is so obscure and precise and full of wonderful images that resonate and linger. To me, this is what I want from poetry.Granted, yes, some of her rhyme schemes feel a bit dated--if not outright forced--so those can make for some awkward reads. Overall, though, I love Bishop's language and will most definitely be reading more of her work down the road.

  • Courtney Johnston
    2018-07-23 18:08

    I fell for Elizabeth Bishop on the first page of this double-collection.The MapLand lies in water; it is shadowed green.Shadows, or are they shallows, at its edgesshowing the line of long sea-weeded ledgeswhere weeds hang to the simple blue from green.Or does the land lean down to lift the sea from under,drawing it unperturbed around itself?Along the fine tan sandy shelfis the land tugging at the sea from under?The shadow of Newfoundland lies flat and still.Labrador's yellow, where the moony Eskimohas oiled it. We can stroke these lovely bays,under a glass as if they were expected to blossom,or as if to provide a clean cage for invisible fish.The names of seashore towns run out to sea,the names of cities cross the neighboring mountains-the printer here experiencing the same excitementas when emotion too far exceeds its cause.These peninsulas take the water between thumb and fingerlike women feeling for the smoothness of yard-goods.Mapped waters are more quiet than the land is,lending the land their waves' own conformation:and Norway's hare runs south in agitation,profiles investigate the sea, where land is.Are they assigned, or can the countries pick their colors?-What suits the character or the native waters best.Topography displays no favorites; North's as near as West.More delicate than the historians' are the map-makers' colors.There's a little tingle of eroticism here, similar to that in Judith Schalansky'sAtlas of Remote Islands - of defining and outlining a shape, in your mind, with your fingers - a description that moves quickly from land to paper to flesh. And the sense of physicality: 'does the land lean down to lift the sea from under, / drawing it unperturbed around itself'; 'These peninsulas take the water between thumb and finger / like women feeling for the smoothness of yard-goods'. And finally, the structure of that last phrase, a tingle in itself: 'More delicate than the historians' are the map-makers' colors'. That's a memory tingle - that line's been ringing in my ear for a week now, waiting for me to find the other line it matches to. I'm almost certain it's an E.E. Cummings. I'm hanging on 'nobody,not even the rain,has such small hands', but that's just close, not want I'm looking for. Hmmmmm. I like Bishop the most when her poems are rooted in very specific details: from 'Roosters'the roosters brace their cruel feet and glarewith stupid eyeswhile from their beaks there risethe uncontrolled, traditional cries.Deep from protruding chestsin green-gold medals dressed,planned to command and terrorize the rest,the many wiveswho lead hens' livesof being courted and despisedFrom the very famous 'The Fish':He hung a grunting weight,battered and venerableand homely. Here and therehis brown skin hung in stripslike ancient wallpaper,and its pattern of darker brownwas like wallpaper:shapes like full-blown rosesstained and lost through age.Often I find her rhythms and rhymes almost daring, reckless - a kind of challenge to 'good taste', packing more and more in: also from 'Roosters'The crown of redset on your little headis charged with all your fighting bloodYes, that excrescencemakes a most virile presence,plus all that vulgar beauty of iridescenceNow in mid-airby two they fight each other.Down comes a first flame-feather,and one is flying,with raging heroism defyingeven the sensation of dying.But perhaps most of all I like 'Invitation to Miss Marianne Moore'. There's such a strong femininity to it, but also a strength, and an intellect - a sense of rushing air and swirling water and gleeful anticipation that I just can't get enough of:From Brooklyn, over the Brooklyn Bridge, on this fine morning, please come flying.In a cloud of fiery pale chemicals, please come flying,to the rapid rolling of thousands of small blue drumsdescending out of the mackerel skyover the glittering grandstand of harbor-water, please come flying.Whistles, pennants and smoke are blowing. The shipsare signaling cordially with multitudes of flagsrising and falling like birds all over the harbor.Enter: two rivers, gracefully bearingcountless little pellucid jelliesin cut-glass epergnes dragging with silver chains.The flight is safe; the weather is all arranged.The waves are running in verses this fine morning. Please come flying.Come with the pointed toe of each black shoetrailing a sapphire highlight,with a black capeful of butterfly wings and bon-mots,with heaven knows how many angels all ridingon the broad black brim of your hat, please come flying.Bearing a musical inaudible abacus,a slight censorious frown, and blue ribbons, please come flying.Facts and skyscrapers glint in the tide; Manhattanis all awash with morals this fine morning, so please come flying.Mounting the sky with natural heroism,above the accidents, above the malignant movies,the taxicabs and injustices at large,while horns are resounding in your beautiful earsthat simultaneously listen toa soft uninvented music, fit for the musk deer, please come flying.For whom the grim museums will behavelike courteous male bower-birds,for whom the agreeable lions lie in waiton the steps of the Public Library,eager to rise and follow through the doorsup into the reading rooms, please come flying.We can sit down and weep; we can go shopping,or play at a game of constantly being wrongwith a priceless set of vocabularies,or we can bravely deplore, but please please come flying.With dynasties of negative constructionsdarkening and dying around you,with grammar that suddenly turns and shineslike flocks of sandpipers flying, please come flying.Come like a light in the white mackerel sky,come like a daytime cometwith a long unnebulous train of words,from Brooklyn, over the Brooklyn Bridge, on this fine morning, please come flying.

  • Justin Evans
    2018-08-09 21:49

    About half of these were really good; about half were eye-rolling. Honestly, you can only use the word 'marl' so many times before it becomes precious. I think it might be once, too. Basically, when something actually happens and she feels free to comment on that happening, the poems are great; when nothing happens and she's just describing it's sleep inducing. For me anyway; I'm pretty uninterested in poetic descriptions of nature. I guess people fall madly in love with her travel poems, so maybe I should have started there, but I suspect that they'll be yet heavier on the description.

  • Greg
    2018-08-07 13:45

    This is a nice set of poems. A number of them deal with geographic features: maps, weeds, an iceberg, a seascape. Some discuss places such as Paris and Florida. I do not have a wide knowledge of poetry, but while Ginsberg is often in-your-face with graphic sex, and Merrill goes deep into, for example, emotional pain, Elizabeth Bishop (in this collection) feels simply light and rather pleasant. This is comfort poetry for bedtime reading. I liked this collection, hence my three star rating, and will read more of this author's poetry.

  • Nathan
    2018-08-10 13:49

    I love her work. I love form and well-done rhyme. She's insightful, playful and witty. Wordsmith - page and ink as metal and fire.

  • Jenna
    2018-08-06 15:51

    My favorite poem in this collection is "The Man-Moth," which combines Bishop's characteristic exactness of perception with a floridly imaginative surrealism that is rather unusual for her.

  • Matthew
    2018-08-12 21:56

    i love Elizabeth bishop and I thought it'd be fun to read her collections at my own pace. I have the collected poems and I just finished reading and reviewing all of North and South, her first published volume. it's so excellent; I love her work. fuck yeah!

  • Jeff
    2018-07-20 15:42

    I can't speak/write cogently on Bishop's poetry per se, so some thoughts.Last week i listened to recordings of her readings. Yesterday, yet again, i noticed that my reading mind has different favorite bits than my listening mind's. Rhyme is more apparent when reading, as if it were visual. I experience rhythm and meter better while listening, though While reading poetry these last couple weeks i also noticed that choice images or words send me wandering through memories more so than novels and nonfiction. I awake to find my eyes have moved over the printed words subconsciously.Returning to poetry feels good, like admitting my attitude was the reason for a silly but longstanding rift in the family. I also get to feel bad for what my actions cost me lo! these 20 years.Bishop's not really a Nature poet. Almost, though, when read immediately after Berryman's 77 Dream Songs. And she doesn't really fit perfectly within the Confessionals either. I wanna read Anne Sexton next and i also wanna read Marianne Moore; it might be a matter of what's available in stores.I liked the overall Sound and the individual sounds of Bishop's lines even though enjambment is inaudible. Perfect example from "Crusoe in England":than otherwise. But then I'd dream of thingslike slitting a baby's throat, mistaking itfor a baby goat. I'd havenightmares of other islandsSo reading shows me that she chose not to break lines at each major punctuation mark. I remember doing this, too, but i never had a reason for it other than it felt like that's what modern poetry was supposed to do. I don't see value in it. Its meaning is as inscrutable as a honk. I don't want "than otherwise" on the same line as "But then I'd dream" or "I'd have" appended to "for a baby goat." Does this uncomfortable abutment signify something? I turned to Mary Oliver's Handbook, which says:— enjambment creates speed because "curiosity about the missing part of the phrase impels the reader to hurry on" and she likens it to leaping over a ditch (the end of the line) [p.54]— "gives the writer an ability to restrain or to spur on the pace" [p.74]— the reader can be allowed to "feel satisfaction at the end of the line" when it breaks at "an apparently sensible point" (ie, not enjambed, me like) [p.75]— "Enjambment can be serious, disruptive, almost painful" [emphasis in original] (me don't much like) [p.75]Bishop's telling me Crusoe (the poem's narrator) feels pain while recalling and writing these memories and he wants me to just move along, don't stop, do not contemplate what it might've been like for him on that island. Enjambment = communication if you don't slow down while reading but slow down afterward to analyze?"Sleeping on the Ceiling" is an oft-anthologized piece that i don't totally dig but i would like to make a short film of it in the style of Clash of the Titans.The first stanza from "Sleeping Standing Up" (the very next poem from North & South) delighted me more than "Ceiling":As we lie down to sleep the world turns half away through ninety dark degrees; the bureau lies on the walland thoughts that were recumbent in the day rise as the others fall, stand up and make a forest of thick-set trees.Damn! i wish i was hot new hiphop honky J Lee on tour with JT and Jay Z cuz i would crush sucker MCs with my refashioned "Roosters" rap.Some similes, for Cristian, if ever he should read them:The palm trees clatter in the stiff breezelike the bills of the pelicans ["Florida"] ... buzzards are drifting down ...in circles like stirred-up flakes of sedimentsinking through water. ["Florida"][fireflies] drifting simultaneously to the same height,—exactly like the bubbles in champagne. ["A Cold Spring"][the fish's eyes] shifted a little ...like the tippingof an object toward the light. ["The Fish"]... Pelicans crash... unnecessarily hard,it seems to me, like pickaxes ["The Bight"]All is silver: the heavy surface of the sea,swelling slowly as if considering spilling over ["At the Fishhouses"]

  • Celil
    2018-07-28 16:43

    Cevat Çapan'ı seviyoruz.. vesselam... :)

  • *Liz
    2018-08-10 21:11

    3,50Kitabın baskısını özellikle beğendim. Her zamankinden farklı bir doku kullanılmış kapak için. Yine de üzerindeki çizim daha güzel olabilirmiş.Çeviri kitaplarda ilk dikkatimi çeken noktalardan biri metinlerin içinde geçen özel isimler için açıklama verip vermedikleri. Maalesef bu kitapta birçok özel mekan ve kişi ismi geçmesine rağmen hiçbir açıklama verilmemiş. Bu şekilde okuyucunun eksik bilgiyle bırakılmasını anlayamıyorum. Metinlerin içinde geçen yabancı ifadelerin de not olarak çevirilerinin verilmesi gerekirdi. Aksi halde bunların hepsini tek tek araştırmak gerekiyor.Çeviride tabii ki ne olduğunu anlamak için sözlük açılması gereken kelimeler var; yalvaç-Peygamber, devingen-hareketli, koyak-vadi, tanıt-delil-sebep-gerekçe, eytişim-diyalektik...Cevat Çapan şiir çevirisinde bu ülkede akla ilk gelen isimlerden ve tecrübesiyle başarısı sabit. Fakat bu eleştirilemeyeceği anlamına gelmiyor tabii çünkü her çevirmenin aldığı karar da beraberinde yorumlamalarını getiriyor. Bu kitapta da dikkat çeken tercihler var. Çapan şairin "all the way to where my reasons end? (Argument)" dizesini "bütün tanıtlarımın sınırına kadar" olarak çevirmiş (49). Tanıt kelimesini TDK'da girdiğinizde ise İngilizce karşılığı olarak "proof, evidence, testimony" kelimeleri çıkıyor. Böyle bir kelimeyi kullanmış olmak ne kadar doğru o zaman?BİR SANATÖğrenilmesi güç bir şey değildir kaybetme sanatı;görünürde o kadar çok şey niyetlidir ki kaybedilmeyehiç de felaket sayılmaz onların kaybolmaları.Her gün bir şey kaybedin. Kabul edin anahtarlarıkaybetmenin telaşını, boşuna harcanan saati.Öğrenilmesi güç bir şey değildir kaybetme sanatı.Daha çok, daha çabuk kaybetmeye alıştırın kendinizi,yerleri, isimleri, tasarladığınız yolculuk planlarını,nasılsa bir felaket sayılmaz bunların unutulmaları." (61)One ArtThe art of losing isn’t hard to master;so many things seem filled with the intentto be lost that their loss is no disaster.Lose something every day. Accept the flusterof lost door keys, the hour badly spent.The art of losing isn’t hard to master.Then practice losing farther, losing faster:places, and names, and where it was you meantto travel. None of these will bring disaster.

  • Christopher
    2018-07-22 20:57

    North and South was the first collection by the American poet Elizabeth Bishop. Though published in 1946, all the material predates the war (or at least American involvement in it) and reflect Bishop's development as a poet through the 1930s and very early 1940s. Of course, the best place to get this material is in the Library of America that contains Bishop's complete poems and prose with a choice of letters, but it's interesting to examine this collection on its own.From the very first poem, "The Map", we find Bishop's distinctive concern with describing specific scenes in detail, that then give way to some kind of universal, transcendental experience. After various musings on the printers' layout of the eponymous map, the poem ends: “Mapped waters are more quiet than the land is, / lending the land their waves' own conformation: / and Norway's hare runs south in agitation, / profiles investigate the sea, where land is. / Are they assigned, or can the countries pick their colors? / -- What suits the characters or the native waters best. / Topography displays no favorites; North's as near as West. / More delicate than the historians' are the map-makers' colors.”And the best poems in the volume continue this style. "Rooters", acclaimed by Robert Lowell as the best work by an American female poet, goes from describing the dawn chorus around Bishop's home to meditations on tribal violence and religious salvation. "The Fish" recounts a victory during an angling trip, only to ultimately make a point about how insignificant such victories are. And there's humour here to, such as in "Large Bad Picture" where Bishop meditates on her great-uncle's painting, only eliptically revealing how bad it is. Only Bishop's dabbling in surrealism in "The Weed" and "The Man-Moth" marks this collection with a certain immaturity. But still, this is an impressive debut. The only difficulty comes in reviewing it: Bishop's poetry is so concerned with a twist somewhere towards the end of a poem that her poems can only be quoted in full.

  • Hooper Bring
    2018-08-05 21:05

    Had two poems I liked a lot and the rest were fine to me. But mostly I was eager to be done with it.

  • P.
    2018-07-17 17:11

    I had no desire to read Elizabeth Bishop before, I think because, while "One Art" is obviously a tight poem, I was never bowled over by it. (I've never typed out "bowled over" before. It doesn't look right.) Then I read an article on The Millions about her and it quoted some irresistibly good poetry. So I took this book out of the library. Not only does it have a kick-ass cover design (this is the original printing), but the poems are so good. Not just well-written, but filled with goodness. Maybe bravery. As with any book of poems, I don't love every single one, but there are so many stunners, poems that I would read and then have to read again. And then sit. And then go back and read again. And I still don't feel like I've processed them enough. They're simple on the surface - Bishop uses plain-faced language and description-- but they take wonderful turns in meaning. She's especially good with colors. I feel like reading these poems has shored up my brain in some essential way.

  • Debby Dietrich
    2018-07-16 17:49

    This book showed up on a list of 25 books to read before you die. I was an English major in college and am a lover of poetry. I love April because it is poetry month and I put poetry books out for display at the library, using this as an opportunity to revisit poems that have become old friends. So I was surprised that I don't remember ever being exposed to the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop in high school or college. She was certainly a noted poet by then, dying within the decade after my college graduation.So I ordered this book via interlibrary loan and read the poems which some googling told me were her most notable works. Sorry to say, her poetry left me cold. There are so many poets who literally take my breath away, but Elizabeth Bishop is not among them. Yet, it was a survey of "book-savvy colleagues" by Powell's City of Book which garnered 1400 responses. I wonder what these other readers see in this poet that just escapes me.

  • Annette Boehm
    2018-07-17 20:43

    Bishop's first collection, published in 1946, contains many interesting poems. The pages swarm with birds, fish, reptiles; there is even a man-moth. The poems are varied enough in theme and style to keep a reader interested through the volume, and it's nice and short, too. As poetry volumes often are. :) My favorite poems in this one are "The Monument", "The Fish", "The Gentleman of Shalott", and "The Man-Moth". Bishop likes to play with language, her images are captivating, acute observations. Her description of the fish's eye, for example, is wonderful. This is an enjoyable and accessible book of poetry. For a more in-depth discussion of the poems in this book, you can visit my blog: http://outsideofacat.wordpress.com/20... -- this is quite in-depth, with quotes and all, and may be too much detail for here. :)

  • Justin
    2018-08-16 15:03

    My insides kept lurching throughout; it's so good I'm physically affected. A lot of the poems take me multiple reads to 'get', because Bishop's placement and selection of words is so economical and sinewy. Form is a crystalline sort of beauty that refracts, splinters, and magnifies the content. You can read a poem for the meaning, for the emotion, for the technical achievements. Your mind focuses on the rhymes or line breaks and that alters your perception of the language in interesting ways. Bishop plays on all of these multiple meanings, resulting in scintillatingly beautiful and mindstretching poetry.Particular favorites include: The Imaginary Iceberg, The Man from Shallot, The Man-Moth, Roosters, and A Miracle for Breakfast (sestina!).

  • Cooper Renner
    2018-07-21 19:09

    I have not been a particular fan of Bishop (though long ago I often used "The Fish," which I rather liked, with high school classes), but decided to pick this volume up when I found it at Booked Up in Archer City, Texas. It was not impressing me until about halfway through, when I hit "Sleeping on the Ceiling," a very clever poem which compares Paris (perhaps before World War Two?) to a neglected room, and suddenly either the poems got better or my outlook and Bishop's began to overlap. I found the second half of this first volume quite well-done and will now need to backtrack and see if the first part is truly weaker, or just seemed so because my ear wasn't ready yet.

  • Michael Arnold
    2018-07-18 17:43

    I'm fast becoming a big fan of Elizabeth Bishop. She's absolutely fantastic, and very much between two worlds (a major theme in her poetry) between a hardworking, Robert Frost Canada and New England, and a working, sweaty, thick-with-humidity Florida. The poetry is mature in the sense that that it does not aim for transcendence (unlike Frost, and that both is and is not a criticism of both Frost and Bishop) but instead it is about conflicts of identity, location, while living and exiting in a working - unidealized world.

  • Chris
    2018-08-16 20:00

    This is simply for A COLD SPRING, as I've already read / reviewed NORTH & SOUTH.Once again, Bishop is wonderful. Honestly, I didn't connect with these poems as much as I did with N&S, but her imagery... holy crap, her imagery... is some of the best around. Her poems are lovely, a wonderful batch of words to swish and roll across your tongue, head, and heart.For folks like me that are still dabbling in the poetry realm, I think Bishop is one of the best possible introductions a person could have. And ACS is not a bad place to begin.

  • Ana
    2018-07-17 15:57

    Lullaby.Adult and childsink to their rest.At sea the big ship sinks and dies,lead in its breast.Lullaby.Let nations rage,let nations fall.The shadow of the crib makes an enormous cageupon the wall.Lullaby.Sleep on and on,war’s over soon.Drop the silly, harmless toy,pick up the moon.Lullaby.If they should sayyou have no sense,don’t you mind them; it won’t makemuch difference.Lullaby.Adult and childsink to their rest.At sea the big ship sinks and dies,lead in its breast.

  • i!
    2018-08-09 15:07

    "I looked into his eyeswhich were far larger than minebut shallower, and yellowed,the irises backed and packedwith tarnished tinfoilseen through the lensesof old scratched isinglass.They shifted a little, but notto return my stare.—It was more like the tippingof an object toward the light."

  • Eirin
    2018-08-10 18:59

    Rating for A Cold Spring (though North and South got the same rating). I feel like A Cold Spring is slightly better than North and South - though only just. Half a star difference in rating. Brilliant poetry in both collections, but A Cold Spring seems more mature and consise than does North and South.

  • Loraine
    2018-07-27 19:44

    Elizabeth Bishop sculpts language into lean, elegant images, images that speak to the spirit. I read these poems while vacationing by the sea during a full moon week. Cold Spring is hauntingly beautiful . . . enough said!

  • Peter
    2018-08-03 13:47

    I mostly failed this collection as a reader. But not "The Fish." I love that poem, and if you read one poem this year about catching a fish (as I assume you will), you should make it that one. You can find it here: http://m.poemhunter.com/poem/the-fish/

  • Amy
    2018-08-10 19:52

    From "Songs for a Colored Singer:""Fruit or flower? It is a face.Yes, a face.In that dark and dreary placeeach seed grows into a face."

  • John
    2018-07-24 15:59

    With respect to Ms. Bishop, I get why critics see her as somewhat minor. The ideas are narrower in scope and the form is banal, but the execution is often lovely. Imagistic, descriptive.