Read Ospf and Is-Is: Choosing an Igp for Large-Scale Networks: Choosing an Igp for Large-Scale Networks by Jeff Doyle Online

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This is the definitive guide to using OSPF and IS-IS protocols in large-scale IP enterprise, carrier, and service provider networks. Well-known network designer Jeff Doyle draws on his consulting experience, offering realistic advice and straight answers on every aspect of working with link-state protocols - from scalability, reliability, and security to area design and daThis is the definitive guide to using OSPF and IS-IS protocols in large-scale IP enterprise, carrier, and service provider networks. Well-known network designer Jeff Doyle draws on his consulting experience, offering realistic advice and straight answers on every aspect of working with link-state protocols - from scalability, reliability, and security to area design and database synchronization. This book is organized to help network engineers and architects compare OSPF and IS-IS. One feature at a time, Doyle first demonstrates how a topic or feature is implemented in OSPF, and then walks through a similar implementation using IS-IS. Professionals who are relatively new to large-scale networking will welcome his practical introduction to the concepts, goals, and history of link state protocols....

Title : Ospf and Is-Is: Choosing an Igp for Large-Scale Networks: Choosing an Igp for Large-Scale Networks
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780321168795
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 480 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Ospf and Is-Is: Choosing an Igp for Large-Scale Networks: Choosing an Igp for Large-Scale Networks Reviews

  • David
    2018-07-25 07:56

    Jeff Doyle is the author of about a bazillion classic networking books, including the authoritative Routing TCP/IP, so I was pretty pleased to discover that he had written a book about the two significant Interior Gateway Protocols (IGPs) used by service providers. His aim in writing this was to explain IS-IS to people who knew OSPF and vice versa: this was not precisely what I had expected, but I did learn a decent amount more about IS-IS networking and the nature of the scaling properties of both protocols.So in general, this is a good book, and the first chapter is a lovely overview of the history of the development of the Internet back in the days of BBN and the early IMPs. Sidenote: the University of Utah was node 4, which explains why I was able to get an Internet email address in 1987, but that was really merely due to hanging out with Chris C - I didn't do much with it until the early 90s. However, the book does have a few flaws. One major flaw from my perspective as someone who was (and is) familiar with both protocols is that there was insufficient depth in the discussion of some of the particulars of summarization behaviors in OSPF and IS-IS: the major discussions of summarization assumed that the big issue would be in concerns related to summarization's effect on iBGP sessions. Another flaw was that most of the assumptions regarding multi-area topologies in OSPF assumed only a single exit point between areas, even as the design guidance was that there should always be more than one ABR. Likewise, the L1 areas shown were connected to L2 backbones via a single L1/L2 router, and the L2 examples presumed a relatively small number of routers in each L2 area rather than the more real-world example of "300 routers in a single L2 area" or the like. Another lack is the discussion of the behavior of the ATT (attached) bit - it should not go without saying that a L1/L2 router will only set this if it knows of L2 routers in a different area.And then there is a bit of design guidance with which I vigorously disagree: Doyle sets off the options of redistributing connected routes vs setting interfaces as passive and makes the recommendation that the former will scale better than the latter, while completely ignoring the fact that most networks which require multi-area OSPF can set most of the nonzero areas as stubs, thus preventing the type 5 LSAs from being relevant - toss in some good address planning, and while the passive interfaces make more LSAs in the stub area, they don't propagate past the ABR, while the E1/E2 approach would be computationally less expensive but require that the nonzero areas not be stubbed off. However, these flaws should be viewed as just that: flaws in an otherwise excellent work, and one which should be read by anyone who will be designing or working on service-provider quality networks.

  • Ben Chase
    2018-07-23 02:43

    Clearly-written and thorough. Probably not a good place to start for beginners, but it was great for me after only a few years in networking. If you're reading straight through, the author is pretty good about letting you know which parts you can skip and come back to as a reference. The author gives lots of practical advice as well as technical details on the protocols. The chapter on security and reliability - particularly the sections on design and operating procedures - stands out as worthwhile reading and can be read without the rest of the book. There are also helpful primers on MPLS and IPv6 that are meant to introduce IS-IS and OSPF extensions for those protocols, but might serve as a good, concise introduction for each.

  • Matthew
    2018-08-14 10:55

    Good overview of OSPF and ISIS, particularly for Junos Routers. Some of the information is a little of date, but the protocols have not really changed since publication and the book remains relevant today.

  • Calvin Christopher
    2018-08-07 06:13

    Jeff Doyle is one of the best in our field, this thorough analysis of link-state protocols is perfect for those wanting a deeper dive into the technology.