Read Bubble Trouble by Margaret Mahy Polly Dunbar Online

bubble-trouble

Another hilarious rhyming romp from the team who brought us the popular DOWN THE BACK OF THE CHAIR.When little Mabel’s bubble gets away from her, it’s her baby brother who gets into trouble. Soon he’s floating out of the house, above the fence, and all over town! And it’s up to Mabel, Mother, and the rest of the townspeople to get him safely back down. Who knew that so mucAnother hilarious rhyming romp from the team who brought us the popular DOWN THE BACK OF THE CHAIR.When little Mabel’s bubble gets away from her, it’s her baby brother who gets into trouble. Soon he’s floating out of the house, above the fence, and all over town! And it’s up to Mabel, Mother, and the rest of the townspeople to get him safely back down. Who knew that so much trouble could come from one little bubble?...

Title : Bubble Trouble
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780547074214
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 40 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Bubble Trouble Reviews

  • Lisa Vegan
    2019-02-05 22:06

    Lots of fun to read aloud! There is a lot of rhyming, a bit of alliteration, and many tongue twister lines.Great for lovers of blowing bubbles!Great for older siblings too!I enjoyed the wacky story for the most part, but for me it went on a bit too long and started to get just a bit tiresome. But the screwball comedy and the language used are delectable, and seems to me that it took great skill to write it so masterfully. Overall, this book is a joy.I wasn’t a huge fan of the cover illustration but many of the pictures inside have lots of quirky components that I really appreciated. I really liked the dog and cat and the people’s facial expressions, etc. etc. etc.If I’d been in a different frame of mind it’s possible I might have given this book 5 stars.

  • Kathryn
    2019-02-16 20:23

    2009 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award-Winner for Best Picture Book"Little Mabel blew a bubble, and it caused a lot of trouble... Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble-bobble way. For it broke away from Mabel as it bobbed across the table, where it bobbled over Baby, and it wafted him away."What fun! This is a great story for those who love words; as a child, it would have just made me giggle with adoring all those fun words, string together so charmingly, creating a zany and delicious read-aloud.

  • Heidi-Marie
    2019-02-09 17:18

    This was a fun story to follow with humorous action and possibly tongue-twisting rhymes and text. I think it will be an enjoyable story to use in storytime (as I'm trying not to do all bedtimey-themed books for PJ storytime).4/6/10 This did not go as well as I had hoped because of distractions to my mind, and the easily distracted group I had for the day. Wasn't quite their fault, either, but the slightest noises or movements had me completely losing their attention and trying to gain it back again. Having my mind elsewhere at the same time did not help matters. Then there was the loud family in the corner where I have to face a bit as I read from the book. I know they were drowning me out, no matter how much I kept trying to get louder. I felt I was screaming--and this is not an easy book to read aloud with it's tongue twisting and non-straight lines of text. I was so hoarse by the end and didn't feel I did the book justice.4/8/10 This read went a lot better. I was able to focus. I got the rhythms and pauses better. Unfortunately, I had a smaller and younger crowd and I think some of it was completely going over their head. I knew a couple of bigger words would never be gotten, but I think the tongue twists and action words were lost, too. They kind of got the pictures, but they were antsy. Perhaps too long, too. I don't know. I'm thinking this will be a definite hit for a group with older kids. So maybe I'll try a school-aged group in the future.Well, even with the difficulties, having read the book more I enjoy it even more. Original rating: 3 stars. New rating: 5 stars.10/9/13 Thought I'd try it again with preschool in my Bubble theme. No. Not as much. The 1st half they were not quite following. I'm OK doing a new word or two, but this book was full of them. Still, I had them tell me ideas for how to save the baby and they were a bit more into the book by the end because of that.6/15/15 Used in school-age movement storytime at Fitness Center. MUCH better. The K-3rd are probably the best for this book. They enjoyed the reading, and liked the story as well. The older kids smiled, but tried not to show more emotion than that.9/14/16 Used in preschool bubble theme. I warned ahead of time that there would be some tongue twisters for me. I only got jumbled up maybe 3 times! Though I did notice I pronounced a couple of words/names wrong as I read fast, but the flow was still there. The adults laughed a lot. The kids enjoyed the story. And one girl, on her bubble coloring sheet, drew a baby in one of the bubbles. :-)5/10/17 Used in P theme (pop). The adults enjoyed. The kids overall liked the story. But way too young to pick up on some of the humor in the rhymes or tongue twisters. Perhaps I should just consing myself to only use this with the older crowd. Smiles are great, but laughs would have been nicer with this.

  • Treasa
    2019-02-06 17:01

    Mabel's little brother gets caught up in a bubble she blows. As he flies all over town, people begin to gather, trying to figure out how to save the baby from falling.I smiled for the whole 37 pages of this book... and kept on smiling afterwards. The rhyme and rhythm of this book is wonderful - it has pep and humor and tells the story at the same time. I loved it. I could just imagine myself trying to read the tongue-twister-ish lines out loud to a child and stumbling all over myself, which made me smile even more. Some of the lines reminded me of Dr. Seuss's Fox in Sox, which is a favorite read-aloud of mine.Poly Dunbar's illustrations go perfectly with the text. The lines are very simple, but the colors and patterns are colorful and silly. Just like the text, the illustrations are fun and a little bit crazy. And yet, the very last page is touchingly beautiful as the mother and big sister hug the baby in relief that he is safe, which reflects the genuine worry that everyone feels for the child, despite the funny, bizarre way in which the story is told.

  • Elicia L
    2019-02-02 00:07

    This fantastic book begs to be read out aloud! Told through playful rhyme, tongue twisters and alliteration, the potentially perilous story of Mabel's brother, caught in a floating bubble, eventually reaches a satisfying conclusion. However, there is plenty of mayhem, twists and turns along the way. Margaret Mahy is a master with language and does not make concessions for her young readers in terms of the rich vocabulary used. Herein lies some of Mahy's appeal to both children and teachers. This story is perfectly accompanied by Polly Dunbar's joyful, expressive and innocent illustrations. Children in Early Years or Year 1 would love this book during a story time session, although Bubble Trouble would also be an ideal model for older children working on poetic devices such as alliteration, assonance, and consonance.Just remember to practice reading this book out loud first to nail the rhythm!

  • Angie
    2019-02-18 16:11

    AWESOME! This would be such a delight to read if I had someone young enough to be interested. It would really take a reader who pays attention.And a young-in would certainly delight to the words and sounds.SPOILER: the last page:And the people there still prattle -- there is lots of tittle tattle--for the glory in the story, young and old folk, gold and gray,of how wicked treble Abel tripled trouble with his pebble,but how Mabel (and some others) saved her brother and the day.

  • Alex
    2019-02-09 20:17

    One of our favorites. Written entirely in sixteenth-note alliterative tongue twisters, it's not for bed time - not at all a relaxing experience - but tons of fun to trade stanzas with your partner, and will probably be even more fun to watch the kid fail at reading it if he ever stops failing to read at all.

  • Carolynne
    2019-01-31 00:12

    New Zealand writer Margaret Mahy has written another superb picture book, perhaps not quite matching the standard set by _The Boy Who Was Followed Home_, one of my favorites of all time, but delightful in its way. The book tells of a hapless baby, Mabel's little brother,who is caught up in a bubble and seems likely to float right away out of everyone's grasp. In an unexpected turn of events, the baby is rescued in a surprising (but well fore-shadowed) way. Well, that is not much of a story. What sets this book apart is the rhymed verse, as bouncy as a bubble and just as full of alliteration. Here's a sample: "The baby didn't quibble. He began to smile and dribble, for he liked the wibble wobble of the bubble in the air. But Mabel ran for cover as the bubble bobbed above her...." This would make a terrific read aloud story, full of laughter and excitement for young children. The cartoonlike drawings reflect the action, always including the unruffled baby--until disaster strikes.

  • Rundle Family
    2019-01-22 19:03

    Sonia: His sister tried to save him. And she's a good girl and she does nothing that hurts anybody or hurts their feelings. Maddie: I like this book because this book is awesome, how they put the words. THey put it in different colors and I love the pictures. I like when it falls down, there's a purple blanket. The characters are pretty. THe little girl and the baby and the mom are my favorite characters.

  • Aysheh M
    2019-02-04 21:06

    It was an interesting children's book, with a lot of quirky rhymes. The cover and colors grabbed my attention and began to question what the book was actually about. The storyline was okay, but the book was rather too long and made me feel bored.

  • Gaby Vallarino
    2019-02-07 20:24

    Summary: Little Mabel blew a bubble that cause a lot of trouble because it wobbled over her baby brother and drifted him away. All the people who saw the baby in the bubble tried to help to catch him, but it was very difficult because it was out of reach. People worked together in different ways in order to save the baby. Theme: The major theme of the story is that if everyone cooperates and works together all the tasks can be accomplished, not matter how hard they seem to be. Personal Response: This book was fun to read because it was in form of poetry and the sentences rhymed. It was also fun because most parts of the book, the sentences were structured in a wavy form following the bubble. Why I recommend this book: I would recommend this book because by reading in poetry form, it makes students to develop skills at reading and it is structured in a fun way for kids to read due to its pictures and wavy sentences. At the same time, it is teaching kids the importance of working together as a group.

  • Abby
    2019-01-25 17:03

    This is the kind of book that one simply CANNOT read silently. Alliteration and surprisingly complex cadence of the rhymes gave a bouncy, cheerful feel to the whole story. The plot, names, and nearly every other word is simply silly, if not hilarious! The illustrations were fittingly quirky. There was definitely more than a cute story that went into the creation of this book: real talent makes this a delightful read.

  • Kali Hilliard
    2019-01-26 16:00

    3-4; poetry; This is such a cute fun story. I cannot necessarily see how it would be incorporated into a lesson but this would be a fun one to have on the bookshelf in the classroom library! The silly poetry keeps the reader engaged throughout the entire story!

  • Candice
    2019-01-19 23:03

    Mabel blows a bubble that traps her little brother who floats all over town. The townspeople all work together to save the baby. The illustrations are drawn with abstract patterns which the children will love!

  • Elena Maddox
    2019-01-20 20:20

    Odd. It didn't make much sense. Would not use for storytime.

  • Annette
    2019-02-09 17:15

    A rambunctious read-aloud rolling in rollicking rhyme and artful alliteration. Playful pictures and a pleasing plot. Enjoyed by all three of my kids, ages 4 through 8.

  • Sarah Beth
    2019-01-31 23:12

    Very clever story with great rhyming and complex vocabulary paired with wonderful illustrations.

  • Mely
    2019-01-28 21:57

    Boy, that was a tongue twister! This is recommended more for K- 2nd grade. My toddler grew a little bored of the text.

  • Rachel Collins
    2019-01-23 16:11

    Genre: PoetryGrade Level: 2This book is crazy and very engaging! I enjoyed reading it, but beware of using it as a read aloud, as the rhyming and length are quite intense. It was a fun and ridiculous book that will definitely help students who are learning about rhyming. I thought it was well written and I have no doubt students will love it.

  • Jenn
    2019-02-16 23:10

    This book is a wonderful example of a rhyming story. Reader beware: this book may take a little practice, the rhymes don’t slip easily off the tongue, but the text is such creative use of word play that the practice will pay off. “Little Mable blew a bubble, and it caused a lot of trouble. Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble-bobble way.” The bubble goes over Mabel’s baby brother and lifts him up out of his highchair. The baby floats outside with Mabel, her mother and then one by one more and more townspeople in rumpus pursuit. The crabby couple, the scrabble players, the patchwork quilters - they watch in horror when naughty Abel shots a pebble at the bubble. Not to fear - the patchwork quilt and the towns people save the rosy-cheeked baby.“And the people there still prattle - there’s is lots of tittle-tattle-for the glory in the story, young and old folk, gold and gray,of how wicked treble Abel tripled trouble with his pebble,but how Mabel (and some others) saved her brother and the day.”The words match the main object of the story - they bubble in the mouth and are such creative use of language - they introduce young listeners to delightful words. The illustrations are warm, sweet and endearing. They combine bright watercolors, softly textured pencil strokes, and paper cutouts of beautiful prints to create vibrant and funny scenes. As the baby in the bubble wobbles across the two-page spreads, the text wiggles and waves up and down to mimic the movements. The story would probably work well in a story time - it’s fun to hear and the illustrations heighten the sense of commotion and adventure.

  • Alice
    2019-02-08 22:12

    I recently found this delightful book at our library, and we enjoyed it so much that I hated to give it back. I asked my 5 year old what he thought of it, and he said, "I like it, but it's hard to read!" The comment was funny, since he doesn't read at all yet. He probably said it because he watched me stumble through some of the sentences as I read aloud to him. But he also likes books that have some sort of refrain he can easily memorize and chant along, so he can feel like he's reading, too: "I do not like Green Eggs and Ham, I do not like them, Sam I am!"Bubble Trouble may not have such a refrain, but there's a good dose of silliness and reading it is pure fun. The story is about a baby who gets caught in a bubble, and floats up toward the sky. How can the baby be brought back to earth without harm?Both the story itself and the frolicking rhyme are delightful. In fact, it is some of the best-written verse I've seen in a picture book in a long time.Here's a small example from page 12:In a garden folly, Tybal and his jolly mother, Sybil, sat and played a game of Scrabble, shouting shrilly as they scored. But they both began to babble and to scrobble with the Scrabble as the baby in the bubble bibble-bobbled by the board.I'll admit that I did stumble on occasion as I read it aloud. And my lips were rather numb by the time the poor baby was saved (oops - spoiler, there). But both my children and I immediately wanted to read it again when it was done.

  • BC Dee
    2019-02-07 22:19

    Our local library happened to have this on the shelf last week! It is one of my favorite children’s books ever. It is a fun story with cute pictures, and an unbeatable rhyme and meter. Any one of those elements would make this book a winner, but Bubble Trouble embodies all three.BubbleTrouble_6-7b The story begins “Little Mabel blew a bubble, and it caused a lot of trouble. Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble bobble way.” And as her baby brother is wafted away inside of one of her bubbles, I too was swept into their world for forty short pages. For those of you who like The Book With No Pictures, you are sure to love the oral gymnastics of this read aloud that just feel good.I’ve read some grousing about a few of the words. I mostly put this down to unfamiliarity with Great Britain’s (i.e. Australia’s) peculiarities. I admit that the word “cavil” threw me, but I love learning new words. Too, if you don’t like made-up words, you might take issue with “bibble bobble” and “wibble wobble.” My daughter asked me what “bibble bobble” meant, so it was a chance to use our imaginations. We decided that it means to act like a floating bubble–she demonstrated and I put words to her movements.The book listing targets four to seven year olds. I think two year olds would enjoy the pictures and the rhythm and the rhyme. I know that my three year old did. And although the action of chasing the baby in the bubble might seem inappropriate for bedtime reading, there is a nice family hug at the end that has proved to be very calming for my daughter.

  • Arlene Peterlin
    2019-02-15 20:00

    In the book Bubble Trouble, a little baby is swept into the sky in a big bubble. It’s up to his sister Mabel to rescue her little brother. Along the way, the bubble floats over the town and assorted eccentric characters react to the baby in the bubble. It’s a fun read with quirky illustrations, but what truly sets it apart are the tongue-twisting rhymes.This book is a model of excellent rhyme. The rhyme scheme is more complex than standard couplets and the word choices are very clever. It’s a lot of fun, and as an aspiring picture book author, there was much to learn here.It wasn’t quite as much of a hit with my little guy, however. In books like Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb he is captivated by rhythm and rhyme, but for some reason, this book didn’t seem to hold his interest quite as well. There are a lot of words on each page, which caused him to lose interest and in each of the times I have attempted to read it to him I’ve ended up doing an improvised, abbreviated version.The illustrations have a lot of personality, and I especially like the use of various colorful patterns.You might like: You want to get a book with very clever rhymes and a simple, fun story.You might not like: The plot is simple, but the rhymes are not, and you might not want to have to deal with a book that reads like a tongue twister. Very young children might get bored with the length of the text on each page.

  • Robin Gaphni
    2019-01-30 16:04

    I just picked up Bubble Trouble from the library because I'm a big fan of Margaret Mahy, and wanted to see her latest book. As I started to read it, I realized by the fourth page it absolutely had to be read out loud. So I sat on my couch (all by myself) and read it out loud. It is such a fun read, although I highly recommend finding a youngster to laugh along with you.The story begins with Little Mabel blowing bubbles across the table. They bobble over to her baby brother and take him away. From there the baby in the bubble floats around the house, outside into the garden, in the neighborhood and down to the shops. All the while, the baby in the bubble is "wibble-wobbling" away. Mahy is from New Zealand, and it shows in her word choice, as well as her character's names (Sybil, Tybal, Mabel). Here's a sample page:At the sudden cry of trouble, Mother took off at the double,for the squealing left her reeling, made her terrified and tense,saw the bubble for a minute, with the baby bobbing in it,as it bibbled by the letterbox and bobbed across the fence.As you can see, it's a bit of a tongue twister, which I imagine gets easier to read the second or third time around. My kids would have loved this book when they were younger and I think kids will want to read it over and over again. Polly Dunbar's watercolor and paper-cut illustrations are charming and whimsical (and remind me a bit of John Birmingham's illustrations).

  • Rachel Trisch
    2019-02-18 17:21

    This book falls into the genre of fantasy, and a unique feature is how cute and whimsical the entire work is! I read this book to some of my students and they loved the illustrations and laughed the entire time, and really got into the story. This book could be used in a kindergarten or first grade classroom.

  • Cruth
    2019-02-16 00:18

    Author: Margaret MahyIllustrator: Polly DunbarFirst Published: 2008The narrative makes it.A luscious use of alliterative, tongue-tying rhyme placed in an impossible scenario with illustrations full of colour and expression. The illustrations are good. They work. They're colourful, funny, intelligent.But it's all about this:The baby didn't quibble. He began to smile and dribble,For he liked the wibble-wobble of the bubble in the air.But Mabel ran for cover as the bubble bobbed above her,And she shouted out for Mother who was putting up her hair.It just reads beautifully.It's about the clever use of language, enticing the listener to love the sound of the complex words, understand through context, absorb language through expression.Love it for the language, the endearing story-line, the clever pictures.Trivia- "Bubble Trouble" made it to Oprah's Kids' Reading List, 2010.- Winner of Boston Globe–Horn Book Award.AgeRead Aloud: 4+Read Yourself: 8+(ISBN 9781742838786)

  • Janna Gifford
    2019-01-27 00:18

    Bubble Trouble by Margaret Mahy, illustrated by Polly Dunbar is a picture book, geared towards the primary age group, that won the 2009 Boston Globe Horn Book Award. This book is about Mabel blowing a bubble that traps her baby brother. The town comes together and figures out how to get her baby brother down safely. I rated this book five stars based on the words as well as the illustrations. The illustrations really brought the book alive and kept my interest throughout the entire book. The warm and cool colors that are through the illustrations really help to focus children onto the book. Just the pictures of the characters alone are quite joyous with the baby in the bubble is such a cute illustration. The eloquence of the words are fantastic for the young children because of all the sounds the come from the words. I will recommend that before you read this out loud, you read the book multiple times because the first time I did stumble through the words with all of the similar sounds. This also helps with poetry and alliteration for children through the book. I think that the concept of this book is really cute and the children can relate to blowing bubbles and getting into trouble.

  • Ernestine
    2019-02-11 23:16

    This book is a wonderful example of a rhyming story. Reader beware: this book may take a little practice, the rhymes don’t slip easily off the tongue, but the text is such creative use of word play that the practice will pay off. “Little Mable blew a bubble, and it caused a lot of trouble. Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble-bobble way.” The bubble goes over Mabel’s baby brother and lifts him up out of his highchair. The baby floats outside with Mabel, her mother and then one by one more and more townspeople in rumpus pursuit. The crabby couple, the scrabble players, the patchwork quilters - they watch in horror when naughty Abel shots a pebble at the bubble. Not to fear - the patchwork quilt and the towns people save the rosy-cheeked baby.This will be perfect for storyhour in the library as children will enjoy so many aspects of this bookThe illustrations are charming especially the tiny feet and hands of each member of the family. I also liked the way the words would rise and fall on the pages just like the bubble that baby is in. It gives a great feeling of movement to the story!I would read this to my class when I start teaching becasue i know they will love it just like I did.

  • Julie
    2019-02-04 00:07

    Illustrated by Polly Dunbar. (Clarion, 2009. ISBN 9780547074214. Order Info.) Picture Book. 32 pages. Grades PreK-2. This is a playful fantasy full of wordplay. There's rhyming and alliteration and tongue twister phrases as a baby boy gets swept up in a bubble and a growing cast of characters chase after him. If you like a challenging read aloud try this book -- but be sure you practice first. It starts, innocently enough: "Little Mabel blew a bubble, and it caused a lot of trouble . . . Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble-bobble way." But once the rhythm and tongue twisters get going stumbling over the words is inevitable. "even feeble Mrs. Threeble, in a muddle with her needle (matching pink and purple patcher for a pretty patchwork quilt), when her older sister told her, tossed the quilt across her shoulder, as she set off at a totter in her tattered tartan kilt." The artwork, watercolors on textured paper, helps by playing out all the rapid fire details from the text as we see the crowd growing and the problem of getting the baby down reach a crisis. You can also use this silly book to introduce several writing techniques to older kids.

  • Elizabeth
    2019-01-22 22:04

    The vivid illustrations draw the audience to become so captivated by what is going on throughout the story. There’s a light hearted atmosphere that surrounds the plot that is being told. The main characters are relatable to children because they are children. While chewing on gum, Mabel seems to trap her younger brother in a bubble. He then floats away without a care because he is too young to know what’s truly going on. As one continues to read, Mabel and her community try to find solutions to safely bring her brother back to the ground. It is humorous and brings consequences to life to children when they are not cautious of their actions. The play on all the words and the adorable pictures helped keep me interested. I thought this book was laid out perfectly for any children that wanted to begin to read and see how different words can sound when they are placed next to similar sounding words. The flow and layout would most definitely help a child look at the entire spread of what is being read to them, instead of becoming focused on one section the entire time.