Read The Young Inferno by John Agard Satoshi Kitamura Online

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Can our hoodie-clad hero make it through the nine circles of Hell and back again? Will he find love with his soul mate, Beatrice? In this red-hot retelling of Dante’s Inferno, readers discover the city of Dis, where everybody disses everybody; meet Frankenstein, the lovesick bouncer with the bling; come face-to-face with the Furies, a gang of T-shirt-wearing, snake-hairedCan our hoodie-clad hero make it through the nine circles of Hell and back again? Will he find love with his soul mate, Beatrice? In this red-hot retelling of Dante’s Inferno, readers discover the city of Dis, where everybody disses everybody; meet Frankenstein, the lovesick bouncer with the bling; come face-to-face with the Furies, a gang of T-shirt-wearing, snake-haired females; and encounter a host of gluttons, bigots, and plunderers from the world of history and politics. Rich with lively references, from Shakespeare and Wagner to the Bible and Beauty and the Beast, The Young Inferno updates Dante’s 14th-century masterpiece for a 21st-century audience. John Agard, one of the funniest and most popular poets in Britain today, offers an ambitious, energetic retelling in verse that sings with wit and originality while remaining true to the original text. Satoshi Kitamura’s deliciously wicked, avant-garde artwork is a brilliant depiction of Dante’s vision, and a delight for readers young and old....

Title : The Young Inferno
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781845077693
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 80 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Young Inferno Reviews

  • Wendee Vezzetti
    2018-10-08 10:09

    SUMMARY:This book is a combination of a contemporary hooded-kids travel through the 9-layers of Dante's hell presented in poetry with the bold black-and-white graphics of a picture book. Instead of Virgil and the boy's guide, Aesop guides the boy. And yes, some of Aesop's fables are entwined in several of the layers of hell, especially when teaching about indifference, mercy and gratitude. This book is filled with wonderful vocabulary, excellent poetry and the modern way of connecting the middle reader to a classic.AGES: Grades 5 and upCOPYRIGHT: 2009PUBLISHER: Frances Lincoln Children's BooksRATIONALE: Classes can read this side-by-side with a summary of the real Dante's Inferno, creating either a Venn diagram or a T-Chart to identify the similarities and differences between the two books. This would be an excellent introductory activity to give students cultural background for when they do have to read Dante's inferno in either the 11th or 12th grades.AWARDS:Library Media Connection starred 11/01/09Wilson's Junior High School 10/01/10Publishers Weekly 07/27/09Wilson's Senior High School 02/01/11School Library Journal starred 08/01/09Wilson's Senior High School 10/01/11

  • The Book Girl (Andrea)
    2018-10-15 05:15

    This was a great graphic enjoyed it a lot. Review to come.

  • Carolinef0x
    2018-09-23 05:20

    The Young Inferno is a graphic novel written by John Agard and illustrated by Satoshi Kitamura. It is about Dante's Inferno and the 9 circles of hell. I really loved this book because firstly the graphic design element and the illustrations were so cool. I really loved the style and I thought it helped bring a lot of character to the book. I think that writing an easier and for some people, more interesting version of a classic makes it much more appealing. It was definitely easier to read than the original...and it also makes me want to read the original. What's interesting about the book is that it takes the main ideas and themes of Dante's Inferno, and Agard incorporates them into modern day events. Like the usage of cell-phones or relationships..Which may sound odd, but it makes the book much more enticing. I loved the syntax and diction that are used. Agard uses a lot of rhyme and small poems that make the book interesting.I love reading classics, and reading this made me appreciate them even more. I recommend this book for grade levels of 7+ and to stop at grade 12, unless you are having trouble with the classic. The book is simply written and uses simple diction to help readers understand. My favorite part was the illustrations!

  • Ashley Adams
    2018-09-20 12:15

    At first, I was impressed with Agard's attempt to keep the integrity of Dante's Inferno while updating for a modern crowd. For example, Agard writes in verse broken into cantos, yet the poet-guide is Aesop rather than Virgil, and many of the tales are framed through the Fables rather than the Aeneid. There is a fabulous scene with Beatrice, taking place at 9 o'clock, but as the story progresses less attention seems given to the individual cantos and plot continuity goes right out the window. A nice attempt, I would have liked to see it more well-developed.

  • Catherine
    2018-10-10 06:30

    I first must confess to having never read the original dante's Inferno so I have no clue as to how close to the original it may be. That was one of the reasons I picked this off the shelf at school to have a closer look at. I figured many students would be in the same boat,would it be enjoyable? Would it make the original anymore accessible? Answers: while I found the poetry clunky at times and the rhythm uneven in places, I felt it did give me some insight into the story and the graphic illustrations are sharp. Definitely worth a look and possibly a useful intro resource for a classic.

  • Jaimie Engle
    2018-10-03 06:28

    The Young Inferno was a pretty cool book, written in rhyme with awesome comic type illustrations. It used modern day equivalents to make the story more familiar to youth, which is the purpose of the story.Unfortunately, I don't understand Dante's Inferno any more now than I did prior to reading this adaptation.A short read, worth it for any teen to have a grasp on the Circles of Hell, and the Inferno.

  • Amy Gay
    2018-10-12 10:05

    As a lover of Dante's Inferno, I found this variation interesting. I liked the graphic images that followed each layer and to see where the authors believe certain sinners belong within the layers of hell.

  • Jess
    2018-10-16 04:15

    I can't take a book seriously that doesn't know who Frankenstein is. Plus the ending was .....really weird and kind of sexist?

  • Dennis
    2018-09-17 08:04

    3 stars for the writing plus 1 for the illustrations. not having read Dante's Inferno, I can't say how faithful it is. but I finished this thinking I had gotten a good feel for the original.

  • Lydia
    2018-09-29 04:29

    All I have to say is that if u read Dante's Inferno and you have any sense of humour, you should read this.

  • elissa
    2018-09-25 07:27

    I can barely remember a thing about this GN a little less than a year after reading it. Not a great sign.

  • Catherine Woodman
    2018-09-29 11:22

    It is the cute and clever (and not incorrect) summary of Dante's Inferno. If the original is too dense then this is a good place to start.