Read The Death of a Pope by Piers Paul Read Online

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Juan Uriarte, a handsome and outspoken Spanish ex-priest, seems to be the model of nonviolence and compassion for the poor and downtrodden. So why is he on trial, accused of terrorist activities? His worldwide Catholic charitable outreach program is suspected of being a front for radicals. The trial is covered by Kate Ramsay, a young British reporter, who sets out to underJuan Uriarte, a handsome and outspoken Spanish ex-priest, seems to be the model of nonviolence and compassion for the poor and downtrodden. So why is he on trial, accused of terrorist activities? His worldwide Catholic charitable outreach program is suspected of being a front for radicals. The trial is covered by Kate Ramsay, a young British reporter, who sets out to undercover the truth about Uriarte and his work. She travels with him to Africa to see his work first hand but soon finds herself attracted to him. Meanwhile an international conspiracy is growing, one that reaches into the Vatican itself. When the death of Pope John Paul II brings the conclave that will elect Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI, a terrorist plot involving blackmail, subterfuge, and mass murder begins to fall into place... a plot that could spell disaster for the Catholic Church and the world. Piers Paul Read's powerful tale combines vivid characters, high drama, love, betrayal, faith, and redemption in a story of intrigue, of church espionage, and an attempt to destroy the longest continuous government in the world--the Papacy. The Death of a Pope races toward an unexpected and unforgettable conclusion....

Title : The Death of a Pope
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781586172954
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 215 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Death of a Pope Reviews

  • Julie Davis
    2018-12-10 05:10

    Juan Uriarte, a former priest known for his compassion for the marginalized in third world countries, is on trial in London for terrorist activities. The trial is covered by reporter Kate Ramsay who is worried about her career and decides to cover Uriarte and his work in Africa among AIDs victims.The story moves from London to Rome, Rome to Africa, Africa to Egypt, and onward. As it does, the cost in suffering and lives that is perceived as the result of practicing the Church's policies is hotly debated. Set during Pope John Paul II's last days and during the uncertain times of the papal enclave that followed his death, we also see the unease of conservative and liberal priests as they wonder where the future of the Catholic Church lies. This is not as forced as it might seem since practically all the characters have had something to do with the Catholic Church at some point in their lives. Practically every hot button issue of modern times in the Church is touched upon. More importantly, it is necessary to the plot that the reader has some understanding of these issues.Gradually, the seemingly disparate threads are brought together by a terrorist plot involving blackmail, subterfuge, and mass murder. The result is a fast paced book that pulls the reader into a world where terrorists are willing to do anything to support their cause.A more complete version of this review can be found here: http://happycatholic.blogspot.com/200...

  • Sarah
    2018-11-19 05:06

    Definitely a page turner! I read it in about 5 days, and with 6 little children, that is quite fast for me!I didn't *love* the characters, though. They made me mad! Ha!! I guess that is a sign of a good book, though, isn't it?Also, I appreciated reading about both sides of the fence within the Catholic Church. Sometimes it is frustrating to try to understand "the other side," but it is important (to a degree). I don't really like using the terms "liberal" and "conservative" in religion, but I know there are definitely "sides." At one point, the uncle-priest (my favorite character) questioned a sister who didn't seem to believe in many of the Church's teachings: "... there would come a time when someone who rejected some of the Church's fundamental teachings should ask herself whether or not she is a Catholic." Well said (well written), I thought.

  • booklady
    2018-11-29 03:55

    Compelling, fast-paced read. Piers Paul Read's latest novel starts off with a bizarre trial and builds dramatically during the final days of Pope John Paul II's pontificate. As the aging Pontiff lays dying, speculation grows about his successor. The reader, aware of actual history but not sure how this story will hold true, follows the missionary travels of acquitted terrorist and laicized priest Juan Uriarte from London to Rome to Africa; then from Cairo, Egypt back to Rome again. English reporter, Kate Ramsey provides the romance angle and Security Service MI5 David Kotovski, the complications.There is also a wonderful, beloved uncle of Kate's who gives her much needed counsel; a liberal, Dutch Cardinal who fancies himself the next Pope and fascinating insights into current Catholic theological, social and moral issues.Don't miss it!

  • Sskous
    2018-11-24 22:24

    a good, fun story. nothing heavy, nothing dramatic. just a little intrigue around the selection of a new pope. However, in a refreshing change of pace, and the reason it's 4 stars, is the excellent way Read handles the teachings of the Catholic Church ~ with respect and without embarrassment. He doesn't shrink from bringing the very best arguments against the Church's teachings on the use of condoms in Africa or liberation theology in poorly-governed countries. His confidence in the Church's teachings is a real gift to the reader.

  • Paula Howard
    2018-11-29 02:09

    I hate to give negative reviews but this books is only worth reading if you need something to put you to sleep. The character are shallow and the plot worth than the characters. Religious fiction/espionage is one of my absolute favorites. Totally disappointed in The Death of the Pope. It goes no where fast.

  • Christine Abbey
    2018-12-14 04:10

    Character development of rich girl falling for adventuresome older guy who is charged with terrorist tactics, goes free, helps African poor while planning terrorist plot to gas all the bishops selecting next pope. Good read on airplane during anniversary trip

  • Richard
    2018-12-17 01:16

    Save your time. This ends up being primarily an anti-Catholic Church, anti-American rant thinly disguised as a novel set at the death of Pope John Paul II (Karyl Wojtyla) and the elevation of Joseph Ratzinger as Pobe Benedict XVI.

  • C.J.
    2018-11-18 00:06

    A bit dour, with the soi-disant villains getting more of hearing than those supposedly on the side of good. But a tense, tautly-realised romp of a thriller all the same.

  • Don Anderson
    2018-11-29 05:22

    Variation on "death of the pope" theme found in so many other works. Read's treatment is more serious than others that read like a travelog.

  • Lynn Kearney
    2018-12-10 23:21

    Skullduggery in Rome - not great literature but an engaging enough story.

  • Isaac
    2018-11-25 04:22

    Another "it was OK" book. The last scene is gripping, but most of the lead up to it was forgettable.

  • Paul Pessolano
    2018-12-07 23:14

    Piers Paul Read is best known for this book, "Alive" which tells the true story of a plane crash in the Andes. The book sold five million copies and was later made into a film.Read, in "The Death of a Pope" moves to Christian fiction. The book has its foundation in the election of a Pope. It is based in the present, in fact, the elected Pope is Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the present Pope Benedict XVI.The book starts with the trial of Juan Uriarte, and ex-Catholic priest who is working for the Catholic relief organization Misericordia (a fictitious organization). Juan is accused of trying to purchase the nerve gas, Sarin. Juan does not dispute trying to purchase the gas but claims that he wanted to use it for humanitarian purposes and that he is not a terrorist. He is able to convince the jury of his innocence and is set free.His trial is covered by a young female journalist, Kate Ramsy, and a young man working for a periodical, David Kotovski, who may not be who he says he is.Kate is smitten by Juan and in infatuated by his work with the poor in Africa. She accompanies him to Africa and becomes caught up in his work and principles. Juan is upset with church policy, especially concerning the AIDS epidemic in Africa and the church's unyielding stand on the use of contraceptives.When the death of Pope John Paul II brings about the conclave to elect a new pope, a terrorist plot is put into motion. This plot could lead to mass murder and cause irreparable damage to the Catholic Church.Although the reader will have little trouble discerning the outcome of the book, it will still keep your interest. There is enough intrigue and deception for even the most casuald mystery reader.There are some very important moral issues that are brought up in the book that are not only plaguing the Catholic Church but all religions and civil organizations."The Death of a Pope" is not only well put together but the author, who is Catholic, does not back off on the issues.

  • Amy
    2018-11-25 01:55

    These are my comments: I wouldn't consider this a review.I enjoyed - but not wholeheartedly, unfortunately - The Death of a Pope.Aspects I liked, and could relate to - the worldly young woman with the kindly priest for an uncle, except that I don't have an uncle who is a priest. She was not a sympathetic character...I wish Read had developed his characters more fully. The book could have been quite a bit longer, in fact, and it would have been nice to understand more about the characters. More, like, how did it happen that she had an uncle who was a priest. Which side of the family was he on. Why - with an uncle who was so good and kind, and truly concerned for her welfare - was she so completely indifferent to the Catholic faith. I think Read tried too hard to explain Catholic doctrine, framing, apparently, the plot around its presentation so that a number of passages rang false. The doctrine was true, but the situation in the passage simply couldn't justify a lengthy explanation...this was a novel, wasn't it? Not a theology textbook.On the other hand, taken with a light touch of not paying too much attention to the theology (even though I consider myself a "good" Catholic, who believes wholeheartedly in its entire creed, I just don't want to be preached to in a novel, to tell the truth - even though I believe it!), it was an exciting thriller! A whole lot of What Ifs are examined, and those parts were enjoyable - but again, in my humble opinion, not developed enough. Was there a limit on how long of a book Piers Paul Read was allowed to write here?

  • Nancy
    2018-11-26 06:24

    "Death of a Pope" by Piers Piers Reed is a thoughtful book. It takes the reader from a trial in the Old Bailey to Rome, Africa, Rome and back to London. The premise is serious: is the Catholic Church at the root cause of the spread of famine and AIDS in Africa? And, if so, what can be done?When Kate Ramsay covered the trial for terrorism of Juan Uriarte, a Basque ex-priest; she became interested in his causes. Did he purchase Sarin gas in order to kill people in Darfur? Did he really mean to only kill their camels as a show of protest? When Juan is acquitted of all charges, Kate decides to write about him and his work. She meets him in Rome in order to travel with him to one of his camps in Uganda. She is appalled and embarrassed by the camp conditions and does her best to help care for the dying. She also falls for Uriarte.In the background of this story is the impending death of Pope John Paul II and the approaching enclave to choose his successor. Some think a more liberal Pope would help end the spread of AIDS by allowing Catholics to use condoms. Some feel they should stay the course the church has held since Vatican II.The novel is not one you can read quickly, it needs to be absorbed and thought about along the way. Kate's confusion about her religion and her life, Uriarte's real purpose in his adventures and Kate's uncle Father Luke Scott's past and worry over his niece's agenda. All compiled into an wonderful story full of information and mystery.

  • Silvia
    2018-11-29 06:15

    DescriptionJuan Uriarte, a handsome and outspoken Spanish ex-priest, seems to be the model of nonviolence and compassion for the poor and downtrodden. So why is he on trial, accused of terrorist activities? His worldwide Catholic charitable outreach program is suspected of being a front for radicals. The trial is covered by Kate Ramsay, a young British reporter, who sets out to uncover the truth about Uriarte and his work. She travels with him to Africa to see his work first hand but soon finds herself attracted to him. Meanwhile an international conspiracy is growing, one that reaches into the Vatican itself. When the death of Pope John Paul II brings about the conclave that will elect Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI, a terrorist plot involving blackmail, subterfuge, and mass murder begins to fall into place... a plot that could spell disaster for the Catholic Church and the world. Piers Paul Read's powerful tale combines vivid characters, high drama, love, betrayal, faith, and redemption in a story of intrigue, church espionage, and an attempt to destroy the longest continuous government in the world the Papacy. The Death of a Pope races toward an unexpected and unforgettable conclusion. This is the first time I read a novel by this author. I couldn’t put this book down. This novel is a great page turner and a quick read.Great characters and interesting plot. I would recommend this book. • Hardcover: 215 pages • Publisher: Ignatius Press (May 15, 2009) • Language: English • ISBN-10: 1586172956 • ISBN-13: 978-1586172954

  • Ruth
    2018-11-18 23:13

    My latest read for Tiber River Reviews is a thriller, The Death of a Pope. Set around the time of the death of Pope John Paul II, it is the story of Kate, a young English journalist from a wealthy family and Juan, an ex-priest who has dedicated his life to serving the poorest of the poor. They meet when Kate is covering Juan's trial for terrorism--he was caught trying to obtain some Sarin nerve gas. Since he was being tried for planning to use it on humans and the defense told how he was going to use it on animals, he was acquitted. Shortly thereafter he and Kate meet. He shows her his work in Africa which greatly touches her. I won't tell you anything more about the plot other than to say it is a thriller. I don't read a lot of thrillers so I don't have much to which to compare it, but I enjoyed it, and at the end was sitting on the edge of my chair. The book was published by Ignatius Press, which is a Catholic publisher. I've read that a lot of Catholic publishers won't look at fiction, so I'm glad Ignatius decided to go with this one. Within the context of this thriller, the author is able to explain why the Church teaches as it does regarding the use of condoms in cases of AIDS. The book addresses several of the "hot button" issues in the Church. The liberal positions are given a positive spin, but by the end of the book you have to wonder in exactly what the liberals have faith.

  • Lm
    2018-12-12 05:06

    One of the worst books ever written. He tries to imitate Hemingway's style but ends up writing stage directions. Just like a child's piano doesn't have the range of octaves to play anything meaningful or engage the listener, his continual tirade that the pope is responsible for Aids in Africa is boring, unoriginal, unimaginative, and unsupported by any facts. Major yawn. The ending is ridiculous. He spends the entire book building to the climax and then it totally fizzles. It's over before it's over. Did he run out of paper or what? And the rescue of the "heroine" is ludicrous because there is no reason for the federal agent to fall in love with her -- she was a major turn off to him when he had a conversation with her at the beginning of the book and they had zero relationship to make it believable. My entire book club hated this book and we spent the entire time ripping it apart. Don't even bother to line your bird cage with this one.

  • Gwen
    2018-11-26 01:10

    There's a big spoiler here!I liked it more as the story went on. The action builds up well and I wasn't able to figure out all the twists and turns until nearly the end. I was able to gain more insight into the characters as the plot thickened. I thought the author strained a bit to build the relationship between the priest and his niece as so strong but the irony of other relationships was right on, such as the low status of Juan's wife and son after he leaves the priesthood to bring "justice" to the poor; his "freedom" from the priesthood to liberate the world's poor serves in his mind to justify his lousy treatment of women, his family and his child. Very good insight into why the Church insists that evil can't be used to bring about good.I also agree with my friend Amy that it was too short.

  • Joe
    2018-12-03 22:10

    This is a well researched book as far as the theological aspects, environment, and history go. The author does a good job of creating and interesting story, however the main characters are all fairly irritating in their own way. The main protagonist is almost a minor character, while the main characters are flawed enough to not be likeable.The book is entertaining and easy to read, but it seemed like it was over-edited, with a lot of the details that could have made it more interesting (for both character and plot development) left out. The book was very short, but I don't think additional effort in describing the main characters or expanding on the narrative of the main events would have made it too lengthy.

  • Louisa Donovan
    2018-12-03 21:55

    Don't expect this to be a Dan Brown style thriller. Instead, Piers Paul Read gracefully weaves a tale of mystery and doubt where good and evil are in the eye - or heart- of the beholder in a novel that reads more like little slices of life than a continuing story. Is Uriarte what he seems or what he is accused of being? Is Kate sophisticated or naive in the real ways of the world? Is truth absolute? Slowly these questions are posed, exposed, and deposed by an author who expects the reader to have some background in Catholic conservatism, liberation theology, and the constant tension between major world religions. Love does indeed conquer all, but which character will make the ultimate sacrifice?

  • Chalky
    2018-12-10 00:57

    I enjoyed this, quite a bit. It's not a page turning thriller, but a good read, well-written. Suspect you have to have an interest in the Church, pro or con, to pick it up, or not put it down when it's plot is a little more subtle and dozens aren't dying on every page.I think my " 4 Star" review was probably a 3.5001, but wanted to balance done of the more negative "1Stars" who seemed yo find it an attack on Catholisism ... Which I didn't think at all, more a well-thought out work which raises some of the issues that Church has, does and will face.

  • Sasha
    2018-11-21 23:56

    So far, this book is terrible. I am seriously considering quitting this book.Well, about half-way through, I couldn't take the lameness any longer and I flipped to the end of the book and read the last 10 pages or so. I am very glad I skipped those ~100 pages. This book was so not worth my time.

  • Peter
    2018-12-17 06:18

    Piers Paul Read is a 'conservative' catholic writer and in this novel, which is stitched around an ingenious plot to kill off the College of Cardinals, he tackles some of the most provocative and perplexing issues facing the modern Church. It is not the best Papal Novel I have read by any stretch but it is truly a novel of ideas.

  • Carolyn
    2018-11-30 01:21

    Post 9/11 terrorist conspiracy thriller that focuses on the conflict within the Roman Catholic Church between the forces for liberation of humanity and those who would keep the status quo: a few holding on to wealth and power while the masses remain poor and suffer.Does become a page-turner in the second half. Will make a good movie script.

  • Janet
    2018-12-04 22:58

    This is not the usual genre I read. I got a slow start, however, the story moves at a fast pace. Lots of dialogue. I am surprised that Ignatius Press published it because they seem to be more conservative and this novel seems to be more on the liberal side of Catholicism. Makes good points and is interesting.

  • Robert Eckard
    2018-12-12 03:16

    Ignatius Press sent me this title for free when I ordered some other books. I did not really want the book. But I started reading it one day with a little free time - to my pleasant surprise, it is very well written, a very good story, the author has a good handle on Catholicism, and weaves his plot around very nicely. I was unexpectedly impressed, and would recommend.

  • Helen
    2018-11-16 01:02

    I remember seeing an interview with the author on EWTN and had made a mental note to read the book. The plot is a totally horrendous scenario to imagine, but possible. The book started pretty slow but became a page-turner.

  • Monica Marie
    2018-12-08 00:02

    Very interesting read with a twist. The kind of book that is hard to put down. Unfortunately, the end leaves much to be desired. After several chapters of drama, the end is rather abrupt. I wonder if there's a continuation in mind.

  • Melissa
    2018-12-13 05:06

    http://legalmama.today.com/2009/07/01...

  • Ali Schultz
    2018-11-26 05:09

    An easy read with an embarrassingly predictable plot and the women written as if the author has never met a woman in his life.