Read In Chancery by John Galsworthy Online

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The three novels which make up The Forsyte Saga chronicle the ebbing social power of the commercial upper-middle class Forsyte family between 1886 and 1920. Galsworthy's masterly narrative examines not only their fortunes but also the wider developments within society, particularly the changing position of women. This is the only critical edition of the work available, witThe three novels which make up The Forsyte Saga chronicle the ebbing social power of the commercial upper-middle class Forsyte family between 1886 and 1920. Galsworthy's masterly narrative examines not only their fortunes but also the wider developments within society, particularly the changing position of women. This is the only critical edition of the work available, with Notes that explain contemporary artistic and literary allusions and define the slang of the time....

Title : In Chancery
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ISBN : 9781853262227
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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In Chancery Reviews

  • Kim
    2018-12-10 02:16

    I loved the first book in the Forsyte Saga so much that I went straight on to listen to #2. Once again, I enjoyed every moment of the audiobook which is superbly narrated by one of my otherwise least favourite narrators, the late David Case. His voice is a perfect match for Galsworthy's writing. The wonderful prose, the great characters, the biting satire, the evocative depiction of middle class England at the dawn of the 20th century all combine to make this a novel an absolute treat. I think of it as a classy literary soap opera and I'm looking forward to the next instalment.

  • Dana Loo
    2018-11-29 02:00

    Valutazione 4,5Un altro bellissimo episodio della saga dei Forsyte, questa volta un po' più corale, con tante situazioni e personaggi nuovi, una girandola di vicende, anche storiche (La guerra dei Boeri, la morte della Regina Vittoria descritta in maniera superlativa) che coinvolgeranno vecchi e giovani Forsyte, nel passaggio dal vetusto al nuovo secolo così significativo e inesorabile per tutti loro. Ancora rancori, gelosie, diffidenze, rivalità, scandali coinvolgeranno questa granitica famiglia così fortemente e disperatamente ancorata al concetto di proprietà rigidamente vittoriano che lotta con tro il senso della bellezza insito in molti di loro...Un vivido e commovente interludio “L'estate di S. Martino di un Forsyte” apre il romanzo, il vecchio Joylon e Irene, il fascino discreto ed elegante della donna capace di ammaliare anche un uomo ormai al tramonto della sua vita, che lo rinvigorisce malgrado la debolezza dell'età regalandogli un nuovo scorcio di gioventù, di calore, di bellezza...E poi Soames, personaggio molto controverso e qui esplorato ancor più profondamente, il suo disperato bisogno di un erede che lo porterà, 12 anni dopo, a rincorrere ancora quell'amore soggiogante e ossessionante che, malgrado tutto, sente ancora per Irene e scontrarsi, questa volta, con il cugino Joylon, la sua nemesi, fino alle estreme conseguenze legali. Chiaro l'intento di Galsworthy di focalizzare la sua attenzione sulla realtà della disarmonia coniugale, vedi anche la vicenda di Winifred e il marito, delle difficoltà che esistevano allora nel divorzio e nell'orrore delle famiglie della classe media superiore di vedersi coinvolti nello scandalo e alla generale, morbosa attenzione dei tanti...E ancora la nuova generazione che tende a rompere con la tradizione, fieri rappresentanti di un nuovo secolo ai quali i vecchi Forsyte guardano con speranza, timore ma anche orgoglio. E sempre quel sottile ma tenace filo familiare che li attrae e li respinge, li porta a sfidarsi e alla fine li lega...Scrittura di una bellezza descrittiva ineguagliabile, toni a tratti elegiaci, caratterizzazioni superbe fanno di questo romanzo, potente quadro vittoriano dai risvolti storichi, sociologici e psicologici, una lettura irrinunciabile...

  • K.M. Weiland
    2018-11-24 03:54

    I enjoyed this second novel (third installment) in the series much better than the first one. In part, this is because Galsworthy has advanced beyond some of his more indulgent narrative techniques. But mostly it is because the characters' development has deepened considerably. Also, I admit to finding their reactions *to* the events of the first book much more interesting than the first book itself.

  • Ally
    2018-12-09 04:08

    There are not enough stars for this.

  • Dr.J.G.
    2018-12-02 22:11

    The Forsyte Saga:-The Forsyte Saga was not planned as such but developed over years with sequels coming naturally as they did, and human heart and passion and minds within settings of high society of a Victorian and post Victorian England - chiefly London - and its solid base in property.When it was published it was revolutionary in the theme - a woman is not owned by her husband, and love is not a duty she owes but a bond that is very real however intangible, that cannot be faked.Wednesday, September 10, 2008.................................................................The Man of Property:-The Man Of Property, with its very apt title, begins with Soames Forsyte, the man of property who not only inherited but is very good in acquisition of property and taking care of it. As such he has virtues necessary to society, honesty and prudence and more, but lacks in those that cannot be taught and must be developed by sensitivity - those dealing with heart. He has no comprehension of those, and proceeds to acquire the object of his passion, his first wife Irene, pretty much like he would any other property - with steady and unrelenting pursuit and some crafty methods that make it difficult for her to stay the course of not acquiescing. In this however he is wrong, and the marriage goes sour long before he would acknowledge it, with his total bewilderment and lack of understanding of his beautiful and sensitive, artistic, intelligent wife - he expects her to settle down and do her duty, and be happy with all that he can provide for her in ways of house and clothes and jewellery and stability, but she is made of a different mettle and is not one to see herself or any other woman as an object of male property.She might have continued the slow death within, forced to do so by her husband reneging on his promise of letting her go free if she were not happy, had it not been for the architect Bosinney, fiance of her niece by marriage June Forsyte the daughter of Young Jolyon, first cousin of Soames. Bossinney has sensitivity to match and recognise and appreciate Irene, and more - he falls in love with her, even as he is contracted to design and construct a house for the couple far away from the city where Irene may find solitude and peace and come to terms with her lot, or so her husband Soames plans mistakenly. The house is beautiful, but the love of the architect for the woman who the house is meant for is not to be bought or killed, and tragedy begins to unravel the lives involved, Irene and June and Bosinney - and Soames.Young Jolyon, the son of Old Jolyon who disapproves of his son's second marriage and has not till date seen his new grandchildren by the woman who used to be in employ of his first wife before they fell in love, is a presence that comes to fore slowly in this, with art - he is an artist, and Irene appreciates beauty as much as he appreciates her in all her qualities - and the relationship and a recognition mutual to both. She seeks his help in the support and strength that his daughter needs from him now, with June too proud to be friend of Irene any more after the revelation of Bosinney and Irene being in love..............................................................................................Interlude: Indian Summer of a Forsyte:-Indian Summer here refers not to unbearably hot 45-50 degree centrigrade summer but the soft warmth of India of post rains in September - October that here the author uses as a silent metaphor for the beautiful life of Old Jolyon in his old age after he has bought the house Bosinney built for Irene, after Bosinney is dead, where he now lives with his son Jo, Young Jolyon, and his three children from his two marriages, June and Jolyon "Jolly" and Holly. Jo with his second wife is traveling in Europe when Old Jolyon discovers Irene sitting on a log in the coppice on the property where she had been with her love, Bosinney, and invites her to the home that was to be hers and is now his. This begins his tryst with beauty that is Irene, in the beauty that is Robin Hill, his home, and the surrounding countryside of which his home includes a good bit.Jolyon employs Irene to teach music to Holly and invites her for lunches at Robin Hill, and listens to her playing music; they go to theatre, opera and dinners in town on days when she is not teaching Holly, and meanwhile he worries about her situation of barely above penury that her separation has left her in, her father's bequest to her amounting to bare subsistence. He decides to correct the injustice she is meted due to her husband not providing for her (this being the weapon to make her come back to him) and makes a bequest to her for lifetime, settling a good amount that would take care of her reasonably, and let her independence from her husband supported well.He comes to depend on her visits, and she realises this, returning his silent affection and appreciation - and he dies when waiting for her one afternoon, in his armchair under the large old oak tree, with beauty coming to him across the lawn......................................................................................In Chancery:-In Chancery continues with young Jolyon and Irene and Soames, the beautiful new house designed and constructed for Irene being now put up for sale by Soames who is tenacious in his not giving up on her in spite of her leaving him. Irene connects with Jolyon, partly due to Soames bringing an action against him for alienation of his wife's affections and then far more due to their being well matched, and they are together in spite of Soames trying various tactics - threat of divorce (a far more lethal weapon in that era), refusal to give a divorce when they wish for it, and so forth. Finally the divorce goes through and two children are born, Jon to Irene and Joyon and Fleur to Soames and Annette, a French young woman he finds in an inn and marries.The new house is in chancery as are the people in this interim period and old Jolyon has bought it partly due to James, his brother and father of Soames, telling old Jolyon he owes it to Soames and to the Forsytes, seeing as how young Jolyon is responsible for the quandary Soames is in. Old Jolyon however is as much in love with Irene as most of the clan, and when once he finds her sitting in a corner of the property he assures her of his lack of disapproval of her finding refuge in the home built for her by her lover.Jolyon helps Irene as his father's wish, and his own, having been appointed executor to the bequest of his father for her, and in the process comes to not only protect her from the husband who wishes her to return (so she can give him a son and heir, after all they are still married twelve years after she left), but also comes to be her friend, her companion and more. He does not admit his love, but she understands it, and their days together are spent in the same beauty that she did with his father until they are thrown together far more due to the persecution of her husband who would divorce her and marry a young woman he has fixed his sights on so he can have a son after all - he is now near fifty and his father James is dying, hankering for a son for Soames. But divorce laws were then difficult and Soames is unwilling to pretend an affair, so his choice is to name Irene and Jolyon, which neither of them oppose irrespective of facts.It is the news of death of Jolly, son of Jolyon, that throws them together finally when both younger children of Jolyon along with Val Dartie the son of Winifred have gone to Boer war and June has joined Holly as nurse, and Jolyon in his grief for his son that he thinks he did not give enough of the love in his heart for him to has only Irene to consol him with her compassion.....................................................................................Interlude: Awakening:-Little Jolyon, Jon, awakens to the beauty that surrounds him, the beauty that is his mother, and the love personified that is his father, even as his days are spent in play about the home Robin Hill that is now his parents' in more than one sense - his grandfather bought it from her ex-husband the first cousin of Jo, Young Jolyon, the father of Jon, after the architect Bosinney who was her first love died and she fled from her husband. Jon knows nothing of the history, and his blissful life is carried on the wings of imagination where he plays out every possible scenario from every book he reads, so his half sister Holly returning with her husband and second cousin Val from South Africa (where they married during Boer war and stayed to raise horses) finds him painted blue head to toe, playing by himself in the garden.........................................................................To Let:-To Let goes on with lives of the various families, and chiefly of young Jolyon and his now wife Irene and their home at Robin Hill, with his other children and their various cousins and uncles being part of the story. Soame's nephew Val Dartie falls in love with young Jolyon's daughter by his second marriage, Holly, and the two second cousins manage to marry and be happy in spite of an initial lack of acceptance by the clan due to their being not only second cousins but also related to parties feuding majorly about Irene's divorce of one and marriage to other cousin.This has the unfortunate consequence of encouraging the other pair of second cousins, Jon and Fleur, in thinking they may make it a success as his sister and her first cousin did. This time however things are very different, and Jon's parents are as unlikely to approve of this match as Soames initially is. Soames gives in due to his heart being completely ruled by his daughter, and goes so far as to plead with Irene for his daughter's happiness, offering to never interact in their lives for sake of overall peace. But Irene cannot risk it, and Jon is sensitive to her and his father's point of view when he comes to know of their history.He would be in a quandary but for the similarity of Fleur with her father in claiming him as her father had claimed his mother, and this repels him. Fleur's lack of comprehension in her loss is matched by her father's when he lost a wife he had a very slim chance to have a life with. And the beautiful home of Irene is now to let even as they leave to go as far away as they can from this place and this history........................................................................................................................... One of the major beautiful things about Forsyte Chronicles - all three trilogies, but the first and third in particular - is the love of the author for beauty of England in general and countryside, nature in particular. Very lyrical. The other, more subtle, is the depiction of society in general, upper middle class of English society in particular and the times they lived in in the background, empire on distant horizon until the third trilogy where it is still in background but a bit less distant.The society changes from the first to the third trilogy but not radically, and in this the author is successful in portrayal of how things might seem radically different superficially but are closer to where progress began, and progress being slow in steps that various people pay heftily during their lives for.Wednesday, August 28, 2013............................................................................................................................................ Sunday, September 19, 2013...............................................................................................................................................Tuesday, September 24, 2013...........................................................................................................................Wednesday, October 23, 2013. .......................................................................................................................................................................................

  • Michael Stewart
    2018-11-17 20:01

    This is the second volume of the FORSYTE SAGA (aka FORSYTE CHRONICLES). Completely engaging, but is mostly concerned with how and when Soames and Irene can dissolve their marriage. In those days, there had to be a spouse to be blamed for the dissolution of the marriage. It's about property, not passion. The novel's title is about this many years limbo of being married yet not married.The older Forsytes are dying off and the next generation assume their roles as the senior Forsytes. The youngest generation, of course, tend to vex the mature Forsytes as romantic liaisons between "warring" factions cause some friction. The Boer War is an important backstory - for many it is mostly an inconvenient irritant of societal changes and some financial losses, but for one Forsyte there is a more personal sacrifice. To me, this volume can't be as engaging as the first novel THE MAN OF PROPERTY - just not possible because of all the drama in that first volume. But it is a good transition narrative between the Victorian and Edwardian ages. AND it ends with the birth of Fleur Forsyte, who will be the nexus of volume 3 TO LET.

  • Elena T.
    2018-12-02 23:03

    Siamo alla fine dall'Ottocento e l'epopea della famiglia Forsyte continua, dopo il primo capitolo "Il possidente", con sempre più contrastati interessi. Perfetto, orchestrato con maestria incomparabile, Galsworthy per me è come Trollope. Regala ore di compagnia impagabili e mai delude. "Nel '37, l'anno in cui la grande Regina era salita al trono, l' avo dei Forsyte - Superior Dosset- costruiva ancora di quelle case che fanno la bruttura di Londra. Per le strade correvano le diligenze, gli uomini portavano ancora le calze sino ai ginocchi e Dickens non aveva neanche cominciato a scrivere"..

  • Siv30
    2018-11-29 23:02

    הספר הזה מתחיל 12 שנים אחרי הספר הקודם.עם מות גוליאן הזקן, איירין יורשת 15 אלף פאונד ועתה היא עומדת בפני עצמה. היא עוזבת לאיטליה ואז חוזרת לאנגליה.גוליאן הבן מנהל את הכספים שהיא ירשה. אבל הוא לא ראה אותה מאז.סומס רוצה בן. הוא פוגש את אנט ומחליט להתגרש מאיירין, אבל אין עילה לגרושים כי לאיירין לא היה מאהב מאז בוסינה.גוליאן הבן הולך שבי אחרי איירין ולא רואה את הצד של סומס. איירין בגדה בסומס ואז עזבה אותו. למרות זאת גוליאן הבן, אינו רואה את סומס שהוא בן דודה שלו.סומס נפגש עם איירין לשכנע אותה להתגרש, אבל בפגישה הוא משנה את דעתו ורוצה את איירין חזרה לאישתו. איירין לא מתרצה ואינה מוכנה גם כאשר הוא מתחנן לפניה ואומר לה שהוא רוצה בן ולכן מבקש שתחזור אליו. איירין אומרת שהיא תמות לפני שהיא תחזור אליו.במקביל גוליאן הבן מפתח יותר ויותר רגשות לאיירין.לבסוף, לאחר שסומס מגלה שאיירין בורחת לפריז וגוליאן הבן נוסע אחריה, סומס נוסע לפריז ולוחץ על איירין לחזור אליו. היא מסרבת וחוזרת לביתו של גוליאן הבן. סומס שמגלה שאיירין חזרה לביתו של גוליאן, תובע גירושים מאיירין וכנגד גוליאן הבן. כאקט אחרון סומס מגיע לבית. של גוליאן, ותופס את איירין מנגנת בפסנתר לגוליאן הבן. הוא מתעמת איתם ואיירין משקרת שהיא וגוליאן הבן נאהבים. גוליאן הבן מצטרף אליה בתקווה שהשקר יהפוך לאמת. ואכן הוא הופך לאמת.באותו הערב לאחר עזיבת סומס, גוליאן הבן מקבל הודעה שבנו, ג'ולי נהרג במלחמה - ממחלה. ג'ולי הצטרף לצבא בשל אתגר שהציב לוואל, בן אחותו של סומס המאוהב באחותו הצעירה של ג'ולי (הולי פורסייט) ומאחר ששמע בהחבא את אחותו מסכימה להינשא לו. ג'ולי שמושפע ממערכות היחסים בתוך הפורסייטס' מנסה למנוע את הנשואים עי האתגר.אחי הגירושים של איירין וסומס, סומס נישא לאנט והיא יולדת לו בת. קצת לפני כן איירין יולדת לגוליאן הבן, בן בשם גון.****אני חייבת לציין שסומס ממש מסכן בספר הזה. בן דודו גר בבית שנועד לו ולאיירין. למרות האונס מהספר הקודם, איירין לא מסייעת לסגירת הקשר בינהם בצורה סבירה והיא לא רואה את חלק שלה בהתנהגות של סומס. גם בספר הקודם היא קירננה אותו מתחת לאפו עם בוסינה, אקט אלים של שבירת אמון. עכשיו איירין מצטיירת ככלבה אכזרית יותר. מלכתחילה היא לא אהבה את סומס ולא היתה אמורה להינשא לו. היא גורמת לו ייסורים ומסרבת להצהיר שיש לה מאהב למרות שברור לה שרק חזרה לסומס או הצהרה כזו תוציא אותם מהסבך. סומס מפתח אובססיה הוא רוצה בן ואיירין מסרבת לאפשר לו את זה באטימות שלה.יותר מזה, היא מייצרת קרע עמוק בתוך המשפחה בהתנהגות שלה ובתלות שלה בגוליאן.גוליאן הבן, מאוהב באיירין ועושה עוול לבן דודו בגלל איבות קדומות ובגלל שהוא מסונוור מאיירין. הסופר גורם לו לשלם על כך בבנו ג'ולי כך שכולם משלמים על החטא הקדמון של איירין שהתחתנה עם סומס מחוסר אהבה.****לספר מצורפת נובלה המתארת את שנותיו הצעירות של גון, בנם של איירין וגוליאן הבן.גם בספר הזה, הדמויות ממשיכות להתנהג בצורה מבחילה עד כדי הקאה והילדים שלהם נולדים לעולם מסוכסך וקרוע. הספר הזה קצת יותר חלש בעלילה שלו כי אין בו באמת דרמות כמו בספר הראשון.

  • Myles
    2018-11-26 00:50

    After years of melancholy and private embarrassment, Soames Forsyte decides he should divorce his wife Irene, who left him years ago. He encourages his sister Winifred to divorce her husband when he steals her jewelry, threatens her, and heads off on a ship to South America with another woman. As desperate as Soames is to leave his first wife behind and start a family with another he becomes obsessed with Irene again after seeing her after so many years. In Chancery finds the siblings trapped and unhappy with the situation their unwise marriages have left them in.Time continues erode the family - Galsworthy's themes have expanded with his knowledge of what will happen to the Forsytes and their world. The Man of Property was published in 1906 and In Chancery in 1920. A style of living that was slowly transforming was obliterated in the years between those two novels, Galsworthy's satire becomes necessarily more elegiac. The description of fraying family ties and of cousins drifting apart after the deaths of the older relations that kept them together keeps the story grounded and prevents the novel from being only about the problems of a privileged class. It is mostly about that, but not entirely.Soames continues to be contrasted with his cousin, Young Jolyon, who abandoned his first wife and child for the love of another woman. Young Jolyon had reconciled with his father at the end of Property and has now inherited his money and the house, also he must pay an allowance to his cousin Soames' estranged wife Irene. More details and subplots make the novels seem improbable, but the overall result is elegant. In Chancery provides the The Forsyte Saga a bittersweet climax for Soames, Irene, and Young Jolyon, giving them what they desire and taking it away at the same time.Previous: The Man of PropertyNext: To Let

  • David
    2018-12-04 23:58

    Soames, the "man of property" wants a son. But it's been 12 years since his wife, Irene, left him - and since he didn't pursue divorce proceedings immediately when she did, and she has remained alone, getting a divorce now is not a simple matter. And, when he meets her again, he still finds her bewitching. More to the point (in Soames's mind), she is still his property, and she has done him a grave wrong. (Never mind that he raped her in Volume 1 - he doesn't see it that way).Things aren't going smoothly for his sister Winifred either. Husband Montie has hocked her pearls and fled to Argentina with a dancer. So Winifred too must look to the divorce courts for protection.Meanwhile, despised cousin Jolyon is living in the house at Robin Hill that Soames commissioned and that led to Irene's flight. Worse yet, in a fit of apparent senility, before his death, Jolyon's father, Old Jolyon, added Irene as a beneficiary to his will. So that young Jolyon is acting as trustee, giving him a reason to see Irene on a regular basis.Poor Soames. This cannot end well.

  • Leslie
    2018-12-04 22:13

    The middle novel of The Forsyte Saga. Read as part of the omnibus of "The Forsyte Saga - Complete".

  • Laurel Hicks
    2018-12-07 23:16

    The second book in The Forsyte Saga is, if possible, even better than the first (A Man of Property). These people are so human!

  • Sarah
    2018-12-07 01:59

    A magnificent portrait of Old England and the Victorian age seen through the eyes of Soames, Irene and Young Jolyon, perfectly painted with Galsworthy's inimitable style.

  • Dr.J.G.
    2018-11-21 02:51

    In Chancery continues with young Jolyon and Irene and Soames, the beautiful new house designed and constructed for Irene being now put up for sale by Soames who is tenacious in his not giving up on her in spite of her leaving him. Irene connects with Jolyon, partly due to Soames bringing an action against him for alienation of his wife's affections and then far more due to their being well matched, and they are together in spite of Soames trying various tactics - threat of divorce (a far more lethal weapon in that era), refusal to give a divorce when they wish for it, and so forth. Finally the divorce goes through and two children are born, Jon to Irene and Jolyon and Fleur to Soames and Annette, a French young woman he finds in an inn and marries. The new house is in chancery as are the people in this interim period and old Jolyon has bought it partly due to James, his brother and father of Soames, telling old Jolyon he owes it to Soames and to the Forsytes, seeing as how young Jolyon is responsible for the quandary Soames is in. Old Jolyon however is as much in love with Irene as most of the clan, and when once he finds her sitting in a corner of the property he assures her of his lack of disapproval of her finding refuge in the home built for her by her lover. Jolyon helps Irene as his father's wish, and his own, having been appointed executor to the bequest of his father for her, and in the process comes to not only protect her from the husband who wishes her to return (so she can give him a son and heir, after all they are still married twelve years after she left), but also comes to be her friend, her companion and more. He does not admit his love, but she understands it, and their days together are spent in the same beauty that she did with his father until they are thrown together far more due to the persecution of her husband who would divorce her and marry a young woman he has fixed his sights on so he can have a son after all - he is now near fifty and his father James is dying, hankering for a son for Soames. But divorce laws were then difficult and Soames is unwilling to pretend an affair, so his choice is to name Irene and Jolyon, which neither of them oppose irrespective of facts. It is the news of death of Jolly, son of Jolyon, that throws them together finally when both younger children of Jolyon along with Val Dartie the son of Winifred have gone to Boer war and June has joined Holly as nurse, and Jolyon in his grief for his son that he thinks he did not give enough of the love in his heart for him to has only Irene to console him with her compassion........................................................................

  • Dr.J.G.
    2018-12-01 04:16

    Forsyte Chronicles:-This work developed over a lifetime and began with a simple theme, that of individual's right to life and love, especially those of a woman. The first trilogy, Forsyte Saga, is the most famous of all. There are three trilogies, Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter being the second and the third. The Forsyte 'Change was written as separate stories about the various characters and spans the time from migration of Jolyon Forsyte the original, referred to usually as Superior Dosset, the paterfamilias of the Forsytes, to London from border of Devon and Dorsetshire, onwards well into the time connecting it to the beginning of the second trilogy. The first two trilogies have interconnecting interludes between each of their two parts...............................................................................................................................................The Forsyte Saga:-The Forsyte Saga was not planned as such but developed over years with sequels coming naturally as they did, and human heart and passion and minds within settings of high society of a Victorian and post Victorian England - chiefly London - and its solid base in property.When it was published it was revolutionary in the theme - a woman is not owned by her husband, and love is not a duty she owes but a bond that is very real however intangible, that cannot be faked.Wednesday, September 10, 2008........................................................................Interlude: Indian Summer of a Forsyte:-Indian Summer here refers not to unbearably hot 45-50 degree centrigrade summer but the soft warmth of India of post rains in September - October that here the author uses as a silent metaphor for the beautiful life of Old Jolyon in his old age after he has bought the house Bosinney built for Irene, after Bosinney is dead, where he now lives with his son Jo, Young Jolyon, and his three children from his two marriages, June and Jolyon "Jolly" and Holly. Jo with his second wife is traveling in Europe when Old Jolyon discovers Irene sitting on a log in the coppice on the property where she had been with her love, Bosinney, and invites her to the home that was to be hers and is now his. This begins his tryst with beauty that is Irene, in the beauty that is Robin Hill, his home, and the surrounding countryside of which his home includes a good bit.Jolyon employs Irene to teach music to Holly and invites her for lunches at Robin Hill, and listens to her playing music; they go to theatre, opera and dinners in town on days when she is not teaching Holly, and meanwhile he worries about her situation of barely above penury that her separation has left her in, her father's bequest to her amounting to bare subsistence. He decides to correct the injustice she is meted due to her husband not providing for her (this being the weapon to make her come back to him) and makes a bequest to her for lifetime, settling a good amount that would take care of her reasonably, and let her independence from her husband supported well.He comes to depend on her visits, and she realises this, returning his silent affection and appreciation - and he dies when waiting for her one afternoon, in his armchair under the large old oak tree, with beauty coming to him across the lawn........................................................................In Chancery:-In Chancery continues with young Jolyon and Irene and Soames, the beautiful new house designed and constructed for Irene being now put up for sale by Soames who is tenacious in his not giving up on her in spite of her leaving him. Irene connects with Jolyon, partly due to Soames bringing an action against him for alienation of his wife's affections and then far more due to their being well matched, and they are together in spite of Soames trying various tactics - threat of divorce (a far more lethal weapon in that era), refusal to give a divorce when they wish for it, and so forth. Finally the divorce goes through and two children are born, Jon to Irene and Joyon and Fleur to Soames and Annette, a French young woman he finds in an inn and marries.The new house is in chancery as are the people in this interim period and old Jolyon has bought it partly due to James, his brother and father of Soames, telling old Jolyon he owes it to Soames and to the Forsytes, seeing as how young Jolyon is responsible for the quandary Soames is in. Old Jolyon however is as much in love with Irene as most of the clan, and when once he finds her sitting in a corner of the property he assures her of his lack of disapproval of her finding refuge in the home built for her by her lover.Jolyon helps Irene as his father's wish, and his own, having been appointed executor to the bequest of his father for her, and in the process comes to not only protect her from the husband who wishes her to return (so she can give him a son and heir, after all they are still married twelve years after she left), but also comes to be her friend, her companion and more. He does not admit his love, but she understands it, and their days together are spent in the same beauty that she did with his father until they are thrown together far more due to the persecution of her husband who would divorce her and marry a young woman he has fixed his sights on so he can have a son after all - he is now near fifty and his father James is dying, hankering for a son for Soames. But divorce laws were then difficult and Soames is unwilling to pretend an affair, so his choice is to name Irene and Jolyon, which neither of them oppose irrespective of facts.It is the news of death of Jolly, son of Jolyon, that throws them together finally when both younger children of Jolyon along with Val Dartie the son of Winifred have gone to Boer war and June has joined Holly as nurse, and Jolyon in his grief for his son that he thinks he did not give enough of the love in his heart for him to has only Irene to console him with her compassion...............................................................................................................................................One of the major beautiful things about Forsyte Chronicles - all three trilogies, but the first and third in particular - is the love of the author for beauty of England in general and countryside, nature in particular. Very lyrical. The other, more subtle, is the depiction of society in general, upper middle class of English society in particular and the times they lived in in the background, empire on distant horizon until the third trilogy where it is still in background but a bit less distant.The society changes from the first to the third trilogy but not radically, and in this the author is successful in portrayal of how things might seem radically different superficially but are closer to where progress began, and progress being slow in steps that various people pay heftily during their lives for.Wednesday, August 28, 2013............................................................................................................................................... Thursday, September 19, 2013. ..............................................................................................................................................

  • Gopal Vijayaraghavan
    2018-11-30 04:02

    In this novel, the third part of the "The Forsyte Saga" John Galsworthy had captured the middle class values of the Victorian era at the dawn of twentieth century. The novel begins with deaths in the Forsyte family and ends with another death and a birth. Scandal, Divorce, remarriage, birth and deaths(including that heart rending lonely death of young Jolyon in a war at distant lands) - Everything touches Forsyte family. Soames, with his obsession for possession of property, represents the disintegrating values of a passing era and is horrified at the show of exuberance by common man in London streets. Jolyon, with his search for beauty is afraid to be caught in "that web; that princely workhouse of the princely instinct" in his relations with Irene. The death of James is touchingly narrated. As also the funeral possession of Queen Victoria seen in the perspective of newly married Soames as well as his father James. The collective groan of the crowd at the funeral possession narrated in the words of the author is as follows : " It moved on with the bier, that travelling groan, as a fire moves on over grass in a thin line: it kept step, and marched alongside down the dense crowds mile after mile. It was a human sound, and yet inhuman, pushed out by animal subconsciousness, by intimate knowledge of universal death and change. None of us - none of us can hold on for ever" Things would never be the same as the Forsyte family is caught in the winds of change sweeping the country.

  • Dr.J.G.
    2018-11-16 23:50

    Forsyte Chronicles:-This work developed over a lifetime and began with a simple theme, that of individual's right to life and love, especially those of a woman. The first trilogy, Forsyte Saga, is the most famous of all. There are three trilogies, Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter being the second and the third. The Forsyte 'Change was written as separate stories about the various characters and spans the time from migration of Jolyon Forsyte the original, referred to usually as Superior Dosset, the paterfamilias of the Forsytes, to London from border of Devon and Dorsetshire, onwards well into the time connecting it to the beginning of the second trilogy. The first two trilogies have interconnecting interludes between each of their two parts...............................................................................................................................................The Forsyte Saga:-The Forsyte Saga was not planned as such but developed over years with sequels coming naturally as they did, and human heart and passion and minds within settings of high society of a Victorian and post Victorian England - chiefly London - and its solid base in property.When it was published it was revolutionary in the theme - a woman is not owned by her husband, and love is not a duty she owes but a bond that is very real however intangible, that cannot be faked.Wednesday, September 10, 2008........................................................................In Chancery:-In Chancery continues with young Jolyon and Irene and Soames, the beautiful new house designed and constructed for Irene being now put up for sale by Soames who is tenacious in his not giving up on her in spite of her leaving him. Irene connects with Jolyon, partly due to Soames bringing an action against him for alienation of his wife's affections and then far more due to their being well matched, and they are together in spite of Soames trying various tactics - threat of divorce (a far more lethal weapon in that era), refusal to give a divorce when they wish for it, and so forth. Finally the divorce goes through and two children are born, Jon to Irene and Joyon and Fleur to Soames and Annette, a French young woman he finds in an inn and marries.The new house is in chancery as are the people in this interim period and old Jolyon has bought it partly due to James, his brother and father of Soames, telling old Jolyon he owes it to Soames and to the Forsytes, seeing as how young Jolyon is responsible for the quandary Soames is in. Old Jolyon however is as much in love with Irene as most of the clan, and when once he finds her sitting in a corner of the property he assures her of his lack of disapproval of her finding refuge in the home built for her by her lover.Jolyon helps Irene as his father's wish, and his own, having been appointed executor to the bequest of his father for her, and in the process comes to not only protect her from the husband who wishes her to return (so she can give him a son and heir, after all they are still married twelve years after she left), but also comes to be her friend, her companion and more. He does not admit his love, but she understands it, and their days together are spent in the same beauty that she did with his father until they are thrown together far more due to the persecution of her husband who would divorce her and marry a young woman he has fixed his sights on so he can have a son after all - he is now near fifty and his father James is dying, hankering for a son for Soames. But divorce laws were then difficult and Soames is unwilling to pretend an affair, so his choice is to name Irene and Jolyon, which neither of them oppose irrespective of facts.It is the news of death of Jolly, son of Jolyon, that throws them together finally when both younger children of Jolyon along with Val Dartie the son of Winifred have gone to Boer war and June has joined Holly as nurse, and Jolyon in his grief for his son that he thinks he did not give enough of the love in his heart for him to has only Irene to console him with her compassion........................................................................One of the major beautiful things about Forsyte Chronicles - all three trilogies, but the first and third in particular - is the love of the author for beauty of England in general and countryside, nature in particular. Very lyrical. The other, more subtle, is the depiction of society in general, upper middle class of English society in particular and the times they lived in in the background, empire on distant horizon until the third trilogy where it is still in background but a bit less distant.The society changes from the first to the third trilogy but not radically, and in this the author is successful in portrayal of how things might seem radically different superficially but are closer to where progress began, and progress being slow in steps that various people pay heftily during their lives for.Wednesday, August 28, 2013............................................................................................................................................... ....................................................................... Sunday, September 19, 2013. ..............................................................................................................................................Tuesday, September 24, 2013. .............................................................................................................................................. Wednesday, October 23, 2013. ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................

  • Leslie
    2018-12-05 20:09

    Twelve years after the end of the first installment, we return to the Forsytes, on the verge of a new century. Galsworthy published this just after WWI, and the book is suffused with a sense of a world on the edge of disappearing, its inhabitants uncertain of what will succeed it and not too sure about their place in it. Soames clings to the life raft of property, as he always has, although it's looking like a worryingly unstable one. Although this is set at the turn of the century (with Victoria's death and the Boer War providing an important context for the characters' sense of being set adrift), the post-WWI environment of its writing and publication is at least as important.

  • Alessandra
    2018-12-03 21:52

    I personaggi sono come sempre descritti in maniera magistrale e spietata nelle loro grettezze e piccinierie. In questo volume L’Autore coglie l’occasione del funerale della regina Vittoria per offrire un’interessante quanto impietosa analisi del periodo vittoriano.Purtroppo anche questa edizione (Elliot, come “Il possidente) è estremamente carente dal punto di vista ortografico e grammaticale, in particolare, qui, il correttore, o chi per lui, deve aver litigato da piccolo con condizionali e congiuntivi.

  • Jgknobler
    2018-12-01 01:18

    Book two of the Forsyte Saga, and this time I had an easier time remembering who's who in the family. Engaging, witty, and biting, it is a lot of fun.

  • Courtney H.
    2018-11-19 23:18

    This, the second book in the saga, might be my favorite of the three. Like the first, it started out slowly, which was a letdown after I finally got into A Man of Property and really liked the interlude story. But the novel built up speed, more quickly than the first did. The book picks up over a decade after the end of the first novel and interlude. The family dynamics have changed somewhat as the elderly first generation passes out of power and hands the reins to the second. The second generation is the center of the family life, though time has fractured the family. The book covers more geographic ground, in part because the Forsytes lack the central meeting grounds that dominated the first novel. The cracks in the family that showed in the first book have fractured them still further. We see more of the world beyond the Forsyte living rooms in this novel. The book takes place against the backdrop of the coming Boer War, and with it Galsworthy gives us a glimpse of British sentiment and ego—and the toll it take on an unprepared country. Galsworthy takes the novel abroad for a time, and explores the courts in two divorce cases. The wheels of the story are restarted when Soames decides he needs an heir, after a twelve-year estrangement from Irene. He still seeks to possess her; he still believes he should. He seems incapable of recognizing the role he played in the dissolution of his marriage, and takes no accountability for the violence he wreaked on Irene’s life. Possession and pride still rule his life, and the desire for an heir—a new type of possession, a new reflection of himself—drives him. There are side stories that inform the novel and propel the Forsytes forward into a new generation: the dissolution of Soames’ sister’s marriage; the courtship of Dartie and Holly, Soames’ nephew and Jolyon’s daughter; young Jolyon and Dartie’s rivalry and their decision to go to war; and still we have the cast of characters, from James to June; and the many other Forsytes who flit around the central story of Soames and Jolyon. There are a few love stories throughout the book; Soames’ cynical and self-absorbed courtship of Annette; the young love affair of Dartie and Holly; and the slow development of Irene and Jolyon. It is perhaps an easy ending, but fitting, and deserved. It is Soames’ demand that Irene be the party of blame in the divorce proceedings, his attempt to reassert his status as husband over Irene, and his refusal to acknowledge her innocence of further cheating, his absolute belief that Jolyon had stolen her away—in short, his inability to see Irene as a person rather than a possession, to be stolen by his cousin or reclaimed by himself—created the storm of circumstances that led to the closeness between Jolyon and Irene that Soames feared. His demand that they admit an affair that had not yet happened may well have triggered the actual affair that resulted from Irene, finally, achieving the freedom in law that she had experienced in practice over the last twelve years. Perhaps I am too sentimental. I appreciated that, after raking her over the coals, Galsworthy relented and allowed Irene and Jolyon were given a new chance to be content. The themes of the first book carry through to this book: the Forsytes’ class obsession with status, possessions; ownership of things, people, and power. The themes are a bit more subtle in this book, the comedic elements sharper, the stories less tragic and as a result, more poignant. These are people, individuals with rich and complicated stories. You do not get the sense that any of Galsworthy’s characters are there to serve his plot. They simply are; and Galsworthy tells his story. His character development was even more full than in the first book. His sketch of Soames as he decided between saving his wife or his unborn child, as his father died across town, was somehow both unforgiving and sympathetic. His worldview was often appalling, but still one felt deeply sad about the prospect that Soames faced on the night his daughter was born and his father died. To be honest, I didn’t find his writing to be remarkable. Sometimes the writing came through in a strong way; Jolly’s death was sudden and simple, a small tragedy in the sea of a thoughtless war, but beautifully written in a style that was jarringly poetic. But mostly, like the last book, the writing is there to convey the story; the language sometimes dragged, but largely it was merely fine. The art is in the characters, all of whom make it well worth the read.

  • Victoria Evangelina Belyavskaya
    2018-12-12 03:19

    ~THE VOID OF LIFE~The Forsyte Saga, Book TwoA man in search of warmth he can call his own; a man in search for stability he can rely upon, a man in search of an heir who will stand strong in his spot when the time comes. The genius of this book is not merely in its flowing and charming language; not only in the depth of such familiar and common to all of us emotions of love and hate, jealousy and fear that Galsworthy paints; it is in its honesty. Have you had the feeling when you cannot stay in chancery any more and yet it is YOUR environment and the way you are accustomed to. And when this feeling of owning something and counting it as your own ignites with the sparkle of passionate love... then you can forgive and are willing to forget even the most horrendous times of your life. "A faint smile curved her lips. She held out her hand. It was cold to his rather feverish touch. 'She's made of ice,' he thought-- 'she was always made of ice!' But even as that thought darted through him, his senses were assailed by the perfume of her dress and body, as though the warmth within her, which had never been for him, were struggling to show its presence. And he turned on his heel. He walked out and away, as if someone with a whip were after him, not even looking for a cab, glad of the empty Embankment and the cold river, and the thick-strewn shadows of the plane-tree leaves--confused, flurried, sore at heart, and vaguely disturbed, as though he had made some deep mistake whose consequences he could not foresee. And the fantastic thought suddenly assailed him if instead of, 'I think you had better go,' she had said, 'I think you had better stay!' What should he have felt, what would he have done? That cursed attraction of her was there for him even now, after all these years of estrangement and bitter thoughts."When I ask myself, what did the author wish to do in this book, I have the only answer that comes to my heart: the void of our desires makes us underdogs of the drama of life. Why some manage to hold up with dignity and others dive into the darkness? Perhaps, the answer is in the core of steel some, like the Forsytes, have in their very nature. I pity Soames. He is a man of dignity; at his very core, though "a man of property", he has sincerely deep feelings for Irene, for his father, for the beauty of the nature and the limitless power of the Creation. He wants the family, to continue his name, to have someone to grow old for... "A wife! Somebody to talk things over with. One had a right! Damn it! One had a right!"Perhaps, the message of the book is that you cannot own anything and you cannot plan for any development. You can hope... you can pray. But the life goes in its own way and you never know which one. People die, houses break down, wives leave, ages pass. Galsworthy delivered it the best in the passage where not-so-young Jolyon and his son Jolly lay to rest Old Balthazar, their trusted dog of 18 years: "With extreme care they raised the old dog's body, whose faded tan and white showed here and there under the leaves stirred by the wind. They laid it, heavy, cold, and unresponsive, in the grave, and Jolly spread more leaves over it, while Jolyon, deeply afraid to show emotion before his son, began quickly shoveling the earth on to that still shape. There went the past! If only there were a joyful future to look forward to! It was like stamping down earth on one's own life. They replaced the turf carefully on the smooth little mound, and, grateful that they had spared each other's feelings, returned to the house arm-in-arm."In the void of life we can only strive to stay human and to cherish the moments passing by, be it time with our aging parents, growing children or compassionate pets. The inevitable passing of time will envelop you with soothing melancholy, raising from the pages of this book and finding a temporary rest on your shoulders.Victoria Evangelina Belyavskaya

  • Simon
    2018-11-14 04:20

    The story has moved on. A decade or more in terms of the action and the characters, two decades for the writer. What made him come back to the Forsytes after leaving them so long as a single, very good and complete novel? Had it always been his intention to write a trilogy? Had he had enough time to reflect that he had struck literary gold with his cast, his overview, his dynamics?This story starts slowly. Galsworthy has obviously decided by now that he has a rich seam to mine and we get far more in the way of serious exposition in the second book than we ever got in the first. Much of this would be un-necessary for this book. It may be The Forsyte Saga but this book, like the first, is very much the story of Soames and, to a lesser extent, Young Jolyon, with Irene featured only so far as she is part of the life of one or the other. Beyond the storyline though is a world being revealed. In the first novel that world was complete in itself. In this novel we see just what a small world it is and how it has become remote from the bigger, changing world that surrounds it, which will, I feel, absorb it.Soames is a difficult and wonderful creation. He makes himself difficult to like and yet you can't help liking him. Unless you know him. Irene hates him, Jolyon feels somewhere between pity and contempt for him, his aunties love him and his niece thinks she sees through him. Galsworthy makes us live through each of his dilemmas and sees the process of weighing up the alternatives, makes us see the decent man inside who blunders as much as chooses to err.His faults are grievous but they are faults of the age and, as the Victorian world enters the twentieth century, what was once accepted has become outdated; what was once a social convention becomes a wrong. Many novelists, notably Hardy and George Eliot, have explored the problematic nature of being a wife in novels. Here we have the issue dealt with, but largely from the perspective of the husband who believes that his wife is his property.Some of the other reviews re-tell the story in detail. It is hard to resist. I want to write at much greater length. My engagement in and enjoyment of the novel seems to demand it. I'd like to go into the psychology of Soames, into the social transitions that were the history of the times, of the impact of The Boer War on Britain, on the imminence of a much greater war. All are explored in the delicate weave of the novel. Few writers deal with them better.The delight is also the hurt. Being inside the thoughts of a man who, through negligence, through weakness, through his own deliberate fault and through the cruelty of fate has to face enough to make the finest of us stumble. Some of the best of the writing is when he is outside the world of The Forsytes; in the Soho celebrations for the relief of Mafeking, watching the funeral procession of Queen Victoria. He doesn't like this world, but, like the gods on Parnassus it is affecting, controlling, overwhelming his own world.

  • Carol
    2018-12-04 04:05

    Continuation of the Forsyte Saga

  • Nicola
    2018-11-28 22:55

    Note: This review contains spoilers for the first book in the series The Man of PropertyIn Chancery is that rare book, the second instalment in a three book trilogy which is the most enjoyable of the lot. In this the fallout of the dramatic events of The Man of Property resonate throughout. Soames remains married to Irene due to his inability to see that he has totally lost his wife's affections and that she will never return to him. He still fails to understand why their marriage has broken down so irrevocably. After all, he loved her and was willing to forgive. He is rich and generous, surely that is enough?It is this inability to understand the sensibilities of Irene (or anyone cast from a different mould to himself) which is his biggest fault and his greatest excuse. Soame's bewilderment rather touches the heart even as it alienates him. At the start of In Chancery he has, finally, reluctantly come to see that if Irene won't be reconciled to him then he must somehow obtain a divorce and remarry if he is to have a son and heir; something he desperately wants. Unfortunately as so much time has passed since the affair with Bosinney he anticipates great difficulty in securing one from the courts. (I spent a fair amount of time wondering why he couldn't obtain one seeing as Irene has deserted him and refused to come back but I guess the laws were much different back then and divorce was not nearly so easy as it is today). The best solution is for one or other of them to have an affair but Soames steadfastly refuses to lower himself any further in the eyes of society. After all, hasn't he suffered enough from Irene's shocking behaviour? In the midst of this impasse steps 'young' Jolyon. His (second) wife is now dead and as his father left Irene an income in his will which he administers for her the two come into contact and find each other extremely agreeable and sympathetic. Along with all of these heart burnings time is passing for the Forsyte family. The Boer war has a great impact on certain family members and the older generation is slowly passing away while the younger generation rises - less concerned with 'property' and not so family orientated. The devotion to middle class values and the dogma of the Forsytes seems to be fading, and with it, perhaps, the pre-eminence of the family as a whole?Time will tell.

  • Scott
    2018-12-13 01:00

    This second (of nine) installments of Galsworthy's the Forsyte Chronicles continues the strong characterization and plotting with beautiful writing and deft comedy of the first novel. It doesn't quite rise to the level of the first novel, but is very enjoyable. The interlude following captured the essence of a childhood summer with the same skill that the interlude following the first novel captured the experience of an elderly man in his last summer. Amazing breadth of writing ability to so wonderfully capture this varying experiences.In this novel Soames Forsyte must decide upon whether to finally divorce Irene or not, while his cousin Jolyon is falling in love with her. Soames is so well conceived. One feels sympathy for him while also despising him. The evocation of these conflicting emotions in the reader is a masterful example of fine novel-writing.We also watch James Forsyte turn 90 and decline in a way very different from his older brother, the older Jolyon. The contrast in their final years is telling.And we are introduced to a third generation, just coming into adulthood and beginning their romances and fueds with one another. I wish that the novel had included a little more about Jolly, Val, and Holly, especially as they headed off to South Africa to fight in the Boer War. I'm assuming we will get more from (some of) them in the next book.

  • Rdt
    2018-12-05 00:18

    In the first book of The Forsyte Saga it was easy to despise Soames. He was a later nineteenth century version of one of Dickens' "hard facts" men. He saw his entire universe through the lens of his property and saw anyone who didn't use the same lens as a fool. And yet even in the first book there was a glimmering of humanity in his love for his father and his infatuation with his beautiful wife, although his feelings for his wife seemed mostly to be about having her as just another glorious piece of property. In the second book, his character deepens and his obsession with property becomes more a tragic hero's flaw than the defining quality of a villain. In this book Soames has more humanity. In trying to win back his estranged wife, he can still only understand his own motivations and express himself to her in terms of property and his need for a male heir, but it seems clear the his real motivation is much deeper: she was the great passion of his life and her loss is terrible for him. Later in the book when he is faced with a decision that is essentially Sophie's Choice, he is able to face the impossibility of his situation and consider the horrible decision that is forced on him with some humanity. Soames never becomes a likable character, but in this book he becomes much more sympathetic and complex.

  • Nancy
    2018-11-28 01:08

    The second book in the Forsyte Saga, this book focuses on Soames and his reaction to the failure of his marriage to Irene. Soames is an art collector; he wants beautiful things around him because they add to his value; Irene is one of those beautiful things. He is stymied by her willingness to face the censure of society to get away from him, which she is able to do when Soames' uncle Jolyon leaves her a legacy in his will. The son of this uncle, Young Jolyon, as executor of the will, becomes her financial advisor. Soames attempts to win Irene back with expensive gifts but ails to understand that she wants affection, companionship, and tenderness from her marriage. Finally, because he wants a son, he decides to divorce her, hence the title. The Chancery Court is where marriage cases were heard. I feel sorry for Soames because he is unable to see that Irene is more than an acquisition to be displayed.

  • Ali
    2018-11-29 22:08

    Published a couple of years after the Interlude, Indian Summer of a Forsyte – which I read straight after A Man of Property – In Chancery opens in 1899 and is set against a back drop of the still new married woman’s property act the Boer War and the death of Queen Victoria. The title refers to the Court of Chancery – where matters such as divorce were settled. This second novel is every bit as readable as the first, and Galsworthy’s characters remain deftly explored. In this novel Galsworthy concerns himself mainly with the realities for all sides of marital disharmony, the difficulties that existed in getting a divorce and the horror of upper-middle class families over the resulting taint of scandal.Full review: https://heavenali.wordpress.com/2015/...

  • Mary Beth
    2018-11-20 21:10

    A terrific continuation of "The Man of Property", "In Chancery" details the Forsyte family saga from 1880-1920. Galsworthy covers everything from the personal family struggles with divorce to the death of Queen Victoria during an age of change in politics and personal freedoms. The dilemma of divorce is detailed addressing the social and legal implications during a time when it was rare to obtain one. The development of characters during such an emotional period was fantastic. Soames, normally self-righteous judgmental and cold finds himself desperate to win back his estranged wife Irene. As “the man of property” he treats her as such and is met with the painful and humiliating fact that she not only despises him, she hates him. The family rift between the brothers James and Jolyon Forsyte families further deepens and is passed down to the younger generation. A great read!