Read Tripping by Heather Waldorf Online

tripping

An opportunity to escape a dull summer -- and perhaps to find a future for herself after high school - persuades Rainey Williamson to join a school-sponsored program that will take her and five other teenagers on an eight-week road trip across Canada. The challenge of this journey is heightened, in view of the fact that Rainey has had to wear an artificial leg from birth.An opportunity to escape a dull summer -- and perhaps to find a future for herself after high school - persuades Rainey Williamson to join a school-sponsored program that will take her and five other teenagers on an eight-week road trip across Canada. The challenge of this journey is heightened, in view of the fact that Rainey has had to wear an artificial leg from birth. On the eve of her getaway, a crucial complication arises: she finds out that the mother who left when she was just a few months old is alive and well and living in Squamish, B.C., directly on the route of the student expedition. What's more, her mother now wants to see her.Rainey's ambivalent at the prospect, to say the least. The cross-country trip begins, and she soon meets the others who become friends and comrades, all with issues and challenges to deal with. Rainey discovers her own strengths as she struggles with the decision about whether or not to meet her mother and figuring out what she might do with her life. In the end she discovers that her family tree is more extensive than she'd thought - and that taking chances provides perspective, opportunity, and a springboard from which to launch her future - and even a way back home. The story is laced with Heather Waldorf's customary sharp intelligence and sense of humour - and her understanding of the themes teenagers are most engaged with....

Title : Tripping
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780889954267
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 344 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Tripping Reviews

  • Tianna Kaus
    2019-06-16 07:45

    This book has to be one of the greatest novels I've ever read, it shows just how much people really go through and still manage to build and break relationships. Especially when it comes to your family, it was heart wrenching in some parts but also put a smile on my face.

  • Arminzerella
    2019-05-31 12:51

    Rainey (16) spends her summer on a special outdoor education program in Canada called WESTEX (Western Outdoor Exploration). Six students from around Canada are chosen to participate, and they spend eight weeks together in the great outdoors – hiking, canoeing, and learning about the history, natural history, environment of the various Canadian provinces. They also learn survival skills and complete assignments (they keep journals) along the way. Rainey can’t wait to get out of town – her father just moved them to live with his new wife, Lynda, and Rainey doesn’t have any friends, and the guy she has a crush on, Carlos, treats her like she has some kind of disease. Unfortunately, Carlos ends up on the WESTEX trip, too – he’s their driver – and he continues to be a jerk (to everyone, though, so Rainey doesn’t take it too personally). As Rainey and the others get to know one another, they learn that they all have issues and obstacles to work through and overcome. Rainey’s issue is her birth mother, who left when she was just a baby, changed her name, and basically disappeared – her own parents thought she was dead. She recently got in touch and expressed an interest in getting to know her daughter, and WESTEX will be passing right through the town in which she lives. Rainey is really conflicted about meeting her, and as they get closer, she gets more and more anxious about it – will she, won’t she? Rainey can’t decide. Friendships and relationships blossom between the group members, and there are tears, laughter, bear attacks, births, and the usual teenage hormones and hijinks. This is full of quotable passages, and memorable characters and scenes. Rainey is the quintessential butt-kicking girl – she’s got a repository of creative comebacks for every situation. She’s funny, strong, sensitive, artistic, smart, and has a prosthetic leg (which doesn’t hold her back at all). The teenagers in this book all seem much more responsible than many of the adults in their lives have been – they’re independent and self-confident and they know how to find and form good relationships. It’s pretty amazing. I really loved this.Excerpts:“If you toss me my leg, Simon and I will walk you to the car.” (p. 4 – This is how we’re introduced to Rainey’s missing leg – due to amniotic band syndrome.)My screams and Alain’s defensive punches only seemed to incense the bear further. I had to do something. And “compassionate verbal strategies” weren’t it. If I’d had a gun, I would have shot the bear dead. If I’d had a big stick or a heavy rock, I would have smashed the animal with it, but all I could see around me was sand and marsh and spindly shrubs. So I did what I had to, what I could. I ripped off my prosthesis. While the bear’s attention was focused on Alain, I bashed it over the head with all my might, losing my balance in the process. In surprise, the bear lifted his great black head toward me. I rose up on my knees and smashed him again, right on the snout where Dan’s “old buddy George” taught us it would hurt the most. The bear gave one ferocious howl and bounded off down the creek bank in the direction he’d come from. I sank back numbly into the sand beside Alain as the others came running. Alain struggled to sit up. He looked dazed, his eyes glassy. His right cheek was deeply slashed, a wide flap of skin just…hanging, and his T-shirt was blood-soaked and ripped clear off his chest in the front. “I love you,” he slurred to me, right there in front of everyone. (pp. 190-191)I inspected the sandwich. Peanut butter and banana. It was “our” sandwich. Some couples had a song. We had a sandwich. I took a bite. “Our” sandwich tasted like sawdust. (p. 255)Two minutes later, the entire Six Pack was up in the tree, striking precarious primate poses. “Group Shot!” Dan held out Alain’s camera. “Say cheese!” “SEX!” we all yelled. “Doesn’t this remind you of a scene from The Sound of Music?” Izzie remarked. Homer laughed. “All we’re missing are those hideous green outfits made of curtains.” That got us all belting out, “The Hills Are Alive…” which attracted a lot of tourist attention, and that of a humorless park attendant who told us to “get out of the tree before I call the cops.” (p. 337)

  • Sara
    2019-06-17 07:46

    I only got about 1/6 through before I couldn't take it any more. I'm now remembering that this book was a donation from a teen trying to get rid of books. It's too bad because the premise is pretty cool: Canadian(**) teen girl with a prosthetic leg(***) goes on an outdoor adventure with the potential for both romance and for discovering a secret from her family's past. I love outdoor adventure, stories with secrets, and haven't read many book set in Canada(****) and I thought it would be interesting to see how the character's "disability" played into the story. But the story was just too utterly annoying. Maybe I don't understand Canadian culture, but the story seemed overwhelmingly written by a 40 year old pulling from her own interests and experiences. The book was written in 2008 and the teen characters all have cell phones, so I determined this was meant to be a contemporary book. So why is our teen narrator constantly making Wayne's World style "uh,NOT!" jokes? Why are music and pop culture references 20 years out of date? Do kids really use the phrase "mega-bucks"? I also quickly tired of narrator Rainey's grouchy worldview and her joke-a-minute smart assery that was grating, and not at all funny. Again, it's like you could see the adult writer straining to sound like a teen.Now, I admit I didn't get far enough in the book to see what developed, but what ultimately made me abandon the story was when Rainey first starts her Outdoor Adventure trip (Westex) with the other participants. Earlier in the story we learn that Westex is super difficult to get into, only 6 Eastern Canadians a year get to go. And that the trip is super expensive. Yet all of the six teens seem like they have been forced to go on the trip. They all complain about aspects of camping, or are afraid of the outdoors, or generally make more and more smart ass comments about everything. And 2 of the 6 characters are talking about how they don't have enough money to go to University. That makes NO SENSE. One of the group leaders makes it clear that this is not a "underprivileged delinquent teen" outdoor program. This is a program one fights to get in because it interests you. So why are they doing the trip if they aren't interested? And of course each of the six teens is a type: the male jock, the stuck up pretty would be starlet, the shy Asian kid, the skinny dork, the nerdy black girl.So, sorry, book. I do not want to read you any more.(**)and (***) I didn't know what this book was about until I started reading it and weirdly the day before I started reading it I had just a)listened to This American Life's old podcast called "Who's Canadian" about Canadian identity and b) and just finished The Running Dream which was also about a teen girl with a prosthetic limb. So I was even MORE primed to be interested in the book.(****) Only other Canadian books I can think of ever reading are Anywhere but Here, Obasan and I suppose books by Margaret Atwood and Douglas Coupland

  • Wisteriouswoman
    2019-06-15 13:48

    The protagonist is a regular teenage girl except for the fact that she has to wear artificial leg. The story follows her journey across Canada with a group of other teens on an eight week school sponsored adventure trip. The book explores the various hidden issues that each teen is struggling with and how that affects their ability to function as a group. Rainey is spunky and the reader can applaud the fact that she doesn’t let her ‘disability’ get in the way of living life fully. Teenage girls might relate to the teen romance angle—it is a bit on the fantasy side though considering these kids are hot and sweaty and bug bitten and lack privacy since they sleep in tents as they travel through Canada’s wilderness areas. At least there is mention of condoms so any teenagers reading the book will at least relate the idea of protection with the thought of sexual exploration. There are other family issues that the book hints at that with hit home with many teens—abortion, disappearance or death of a parent, divorce, child abandonment, homosexuality, etc. The author also makes sure that there is a variety of ethnic groups represented: a francophone, a Chinese immigrant, a skinny red-headed kid, a black girl, a drama queen, and a kid with a disability. It is a nice change from the American blond-haired white teenage cheer leaders going after football jocks and being mean to each other or sharing secrets with their BFF.There are a few things I found annoying. The first one is that the protagonist will state something and then the author follows up with the thought ‘I lied’. It is too blunt and makes the main character seem dishonest—people say things that are not completely honest in order to protect themselves and be a good sport but it isn’t the same thing as being a liar. Another thing is that one of the teenagers is totally annoying and has an irritating way of speaking. There could have been a better way to get the point across that the girl is unpleasant to be around without making the reader cringe too. I also hate it when authors use the word ‘sashay’—does anyone actually use this word in real life? I’ve never heard a teenager say it. Over all it is a great teenage adventure story that deals with some hard real-life issues and shows how we all are on a journey to work through whatever challenges life throws at us. It is great to see that US libraries are trying to stock more books by Canadian authors. I have read several books by this author and can definitely recommend them.

  • Canadian Children's Book Centre
    2019-06-26 12:43

    As one of six Toronto-area teens selected for an eight week long study/camping trip, Rainey is both eager and filled with anxiety. She knows that this trip is more than just a summer-long outdoor adventure. For one thing, she is hoping that she will make some decisions about finding a practical career that will please her father – even though all she really wants to do is draw and paint and maybe go to art college. There is another major decision to make. The final stop on their tour will bring Rainey to the hometown of Sara, the mother who left when Rainey was only six months old. After all these years, Sara has sought contact with her daughter but she has left it up to Rainey to decide if she wants to meet. While her father and his new wife clearly feel that she should seize this opportunity, Rainey isn’t so sure. But as the summer unfolds and she watches her peers confront their own issues, she finds the courage to do what she needs to do and comes to some important conclusions.Heather Waldorf’s latest offering is an absorbing story that touches on a terrific number of issues faced by contemporary teens. Rainey’s traveling companions each have their own stories – stories of loss, rejection and betrayal – and Rainey herself has recently faced a staggering number of challenges. Yet she is a feisty young woman who meets the hardships that she encounters on this trip bravely. Her passion and determination make her a likeable character and the fact that she is physically handicapped makes her all the more admirable – particularly when she uses her prosthetic leg to bash a bear! It is wonderful to have a book that offers readers a handicapped protagonist whose disability is neither the focus of the story nor a barrier to her in any way. This will make it a valuable addition to school and classroom libraries.Reviewed by Lisa Doucet in Canadian Children's Book NewsWinter 2009 VOL.32 NO.1

  • Emily
    2019-06-25 12:36

    Why I picked it up: It was on the YALSA challenge list and sounded like my kind of book.Rainey is seventeen. She lived most of her life in a small town with her single dad, Greg, but when he married obstetrician Lynda a year ago, they moved into Lynda's house in Toronto. Rainey didn't like moving away from her friends, but will be spending the summer before her senior year on a cross-Canada educational trip with 5 other students from other Toronto high schools. The day before she leaves, Greg tells Rainey that the trip will take her close to where her mother is, and her mother wants to see her. Rainey's mother left when she was only 6 months old and Rainey is convinced it is because she was born with one leg cut off below the knee. Now Rainey must decide if she wants to visit the mother she doesn't know.I liked it. I am a fan of find-yourself books with a cast of characters thrown together, though, so it was a pretty good bet for me. I liked Rianey and how she would shut down people who were obnoxious about her leg. I love Alain. And I loved Lynda. (Those 2 are the reasons for the “characters I wish I knew” tag, especially Lynda.) The last third was a bit on the neat side, but overall I really enjoyed it.Contains: language; sex; drug referencesQuote: “God, all those hours I'd spent obsessing over him last spring. Hours that I'd never get back. Hours I could have spent painting a masterpiece. Or learning an instrument. Or even just... flossing.” (page 131)

  • Anna Motteler
    2019-06-02 15:50

    An opportunity to escape a dull summer -- and perhaps to find a future for herself after high school - persuades Rainey Williamson to join a school-sponsored program that will take her and five other teenagers on an eight-week road trip across Canada. The challenge of this journey is heightened, in view of the fact that Rainey has had to wear an artificial leg from birth. On the eve of her getaway, a crucial complication arises: she finds out that the mother who left when she was just a few months old is alive and well and living in Squamish, B.C., directly on the route of the student expedition. What's more, her mother now wants to see her.Rainey's ambivalent at the prospect, to say the least. The cross-country trip begins, and she soon meets the others who become friends and comrades, all with issues and challenges to deal with. Rainey discovers her own strengths as she struggles with the decision about whether or not to meet her mother and figuring out what she might do with her life. In the end she discovers that her family tree is more extensive than she'd thought - and that taking chances provides perspective, opportunity, and a springboard from which to launch her future - and even a way back home. The story is laced with Heather Waldorf's customary sharp intelligence and sense of humour - and her understanding of the themes teenagers are most engaged with.

  • Emmaj
    2019-06-09 14:29

    I read this as part if the YALSA 2012 Book Challenge and, honestly, it was a second choice. It should have been my first. I was going to read Leverage which has Gritty Realism. Did you know that Gritty Realism is a euphemism for lots of swearing and lovingly described violence? Me neither.This book also has gritty realism by which I mean that it is about normal, everyday people with everyday problems that you can relate to.Rainey, our heroine, is about to go off on an eight-week, cross-Canada trip which will count as three classes toward graduating high school.Of course, her secret crush is going to be the driver. And she will pass through the town where her mother, the one who abandoned her as a baby, now lives. And her father has warned her not to break her new high tech prosthesis (she was born missing one leg from the calf down). And will she like the five other kids on the trip? You get the idea.Waldorf has a great voice and captures the everyday dilemmas with conviction. I ended up loving this book so much more than I would have thought from reading the book jacket.

  • Yuai Kozuchi
    2019-06-12 15:32

    Based on all the books I have read, this is one of the books more on the adult side because it contains mature content. It is a fun book to read because the main as well as the minor characters are dynamic characters who of which changes throughout the story. Not only that but since the setting takes place on a trip around Canada, it is a chance to learn about some of the places and historical figures of Canada. On the dull side, personally, I find it hard to adapt to each chapter because of the fact that I don't know the geography of Canada and that each day(transitions)in the book is very swift and fast-moving. Yet on the bright side, it is a very funny book because the characters in the book all have different personalities and most of the times some overrule others and some get stronger by it taking effect. As you flip further in the book, the content gets more dramatic which made my eyes get closer to the pages and gain interest of the story. This book is in the hands of a girls' perspective so it is very easy to relate to in terms of thoughts and feelings. I wouldn't really suggest it as the best book yet it is a book that you may read for fun and ones who like adventures.

  • Dani
    2019-06-24 07:47

    I was wary to read this book at first. But it would have been a mistake not too. I absolutely adored it! When Carlos was the first to be thought of often from Rainey, I had a guess that she had a crush on him. Then Alain got involved. I suspected a battle of the boys to win Rainey over, but it didn't happen. I liked what happened. Without really rushing things (except for the I-love-yous), Rainey and Alain really connected. Of course jealously had to e an issue at some point, but that made it better. Evan was a shock. At first I thought he was her twin, but then time explained things and he seemed like a devoted person. Evan sounds like a super nice brother, with a geeky charm, that would make anyone fall in love with him. The meeting with Sara was surprising, yet expected. I knew things would get loud, but I expected Sara to have a better reason to run off. It made her seem like she didn't love her daughter enough. :(Nonetheless, it was a really good book that keeps you hooked.

  • Sarah
    2019-06-15 10:47

    I'm always a fan of seeing a main character in a book with a disability, especially when it isn't a book "about" the disability. So I liked how Rainey's artificial leg is a part of this YA novel, but not really the entire plot. Rainey is Canadian and takes off on a student trip across the country to learn more about the culture, history, and nature. Along the way, she's trying to figure out what she wants to do with her life. She loves to draw, but should she major in something "more realistic" like her father wants her to? And should she let her cool new step-mom into her life? Or keep blocking her out? Rainey's mom left when Rainey was a baby, and on this trip Rainey can try to see her. If she wants. All sorts of important decisions are being made her this summer, so it's quite the coming-of-age novel.

  • Sandy
    2019-06-17 08:59

    Rainey was born with only one leg, but she has a prosthesis that lets her be very active. She applies and is accepted into a program hiking and camping across Canada during the summer before her senior year of high school. The small Westex group learns wilderness survival, has adventures with bears, rafting, canoeing, etc. Rainey and the group bond and support each other, and Rainey also learns to accept her stepmother, and some of the choices her birth mother made. Long book, but there's lots about family and some romance and adventure thrown in. Very nice read.

  • Karie
    2019-06-16 14:30

    First of all, there is some language in this book. Be warned. On to the good stuff: This book was recommended to me by someone looking at the same shelf I was looking at in the library. Waldorf has a compelling voice and the story is very interesting and twisty. I liked the main character a lot, especially because she wasn't full of neuroses (that might stem from other reading I've been doing lately). So I recommend it with caution.

  • Ianna Zarkowski
    2019-06-24 15:31

    This book was funny, and heart throbbing. I loved it so much. The characters were funny and the plot was definitely well thought out. There wasn't a ton of run ons, which made it a great quick read for me. I loved the main character Rainy she was funny and isn't afraid to be who she wants. She's loud and outgoing and even tho she has an artificial leg, she doesn't let that get in the way of what she does. She also brings a lot of humor in the book.

  • Robin
    2019-06-01 09:33

    I read this book a while ago, but I remember it was a heartwarming novel about a spunky girl on this survival type trip with a few other students around her age. The whole premise of the book was that this girl had a prosthetic leg; however, I loved how she was kind of like "whatever" about it and was still super confident. I enjoyed the characters and the romance within the novel. It kept my interest!

  • Tracie
    2019-06-16 14:54

    Seven young people come together for a trip across Canada during summer break. The trip will earn them 3 high school credits, but more than that, secrets will be revealed, love will blossom and life threatening danger will bring rewards and heartache. These teens were great characters. For mature readers.

  • Sarah
    2019-06-09 08:45

    I really loved this book-solid, entertaining, thoughtful realistic fiction, with some interesting things that make the story really stand out-Canadian history, a prosthetic leg, and a good road trip.http://sarahsbookjournal.wordpress.co...

  • Jamie Henry
    2019-06-11 13:38

    This book was absolutely amazing. I was speechless when I was finished reading it, simply because of the fact that the author is an amazing writer and knows how to write about the problems this girl faced.

  • Hanna Miller
    2019-05-30 15:32

    It was a great book and it was really empowering to read about a woman who overcame so many struggles and learned how to cope and live with her disability and life her life to the fullest without letting it hinder her.

  • Claire
    2019-06-22 13:42

    Saying life is a bumpy ride for Rainey is a total understatement. She gets through life though just like anyone else does: by tripping. Rainey story of her struggles is one everyone can relate to and learn from.

  • Holly
    2019-06-02 11:56

    Looking for a different story then the ones I usually read (end of world or fantasy) its for sure there. This is a real story like the characters were more real and the events could take place. I liked the change. It was a good story with a nice ending.

  • Sarah Wright
    2019-05-29 07:43

    Coming of age story about a girl with a prosthetic leg taking a trip across Canada. Interesting, fun, intense in parts- I really liked it.

  • Mindy
    2019-05-31 08:42

    There aren't too many books about kids/teens with amniotic band syndrome. This one is all right.

  • treehugger
    2019-06-21 15:53

    not so great. Overly dramatic. Nice story and conclusion but the dramatic moments are over done.

  • Kate Carlson
    2019-06-15 12:40

    Good book...kept me hooked...a bit predictable and "after-school" special though.

  • Alicia
    2019-06-24 15:29

    I really started off liking this book. The characters are really vivid and great characterization. I kinda was disappointed by the last 20 pages

  • Thorn MotherIssues
    2019-06-24 08:58

    Teen reading challenge. So Canadian! Lots of tangential stuff about crisis pregnancies in ways that work out to be pretty interesting.

  • PyroLily ~Qui scribit bis legit~
    2019-05-31 11:57

    How much can you handly over one summer?

  • Jessie
    2019-06-26 12:48

    A friend recommended this gem to me an I am so glad she did! This is a fantastic novel that I wish more people knew about. I'd read it again in a heartbeat.