Read Computational Geometry in C by Joseph O'Rourke Online

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This is the newly revised and expanded edition of a popular introduction to the design and implementation of geometry algorithms arising in areas such as computer graphics, robotics, and engineering design. The basic techniques used in computational geometry are all covered: polygon triangualtions, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams, arrangements, geometric searching, and motiThis is the newly revised and expanded edition of a popular introduction to the design and implementation of geometry algorithms arising in areas such as computer graphics, robotics, and engineering design. The basic techniques used in computational geometry are all covered: polygon triangualtions, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams, arrangements, geometric searching, and motion planning. The self-contained treatment presumes only an elementary knowledge of mathematics, but it reaches topics on the frontier of current research. Thus professional programmers will find it a useful tutorial....

Title : Computational Geometry in C
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ISBN : 9780521649766
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 392 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Computational Geometry in C Reviews

  • Alun Williams
    2019-06-20 07:29

    What this book covers it usually covers well and in an interesting and thoughtful way. An undergraduate following a computer science course teaching several of the topics in this book would probably find it very useful. However, if you come to this book expecting it to solve some particular geometric problem you are liable to be disappointed. In particular there is little or no material relating to graphical questions. In the course of the book's 8 proper chapters (there is a chapter 9 listing further possible sources of information) there are only 12 algorithms given in full. Most of the book is taken up with various questions relating to convex hulls (two chapters), polygons, and polyhedra (three chapters). The other chapters are about Voronoi diagrams and motion planning. The latter is one of the few chapters where the author considers questions about circles in detail.The author has a strong aversion to the use of floating point numbers and recommends using integers instead, though he is fairly silent on what one is supposed to do if the data being dealt with is naturally floating point in character. The emphasis on integer arithmetic means that in numerous places he is forced to discuss questions about overflow. He has a somewhat optimistic attitude to special cases - even though is often the case that the main practical difficulty of dealing with a geometric problem on a computer lies in handling special cases correctly.Overall, this is a good book for the programmer interested in geometric questions to have on his bookshelf, but it is unlikely to be the only one he or she will need, or even the most useful.