Read Why Should Anyone Believe Anything at All? by James W. Sire Online

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With insight and humor, James Sire takes a look at the actual reasons people give for believing what they do. He then probes further to suggest more satisfying and compelling reasons for belief. Having explored the issue of belief in general, he turns to the question of believing that the Christian faith is true. Central to Christianity's truth claims, he argues, is the peWith insight and humor, James Sire takes a look at the actual reasons people give for believing what they do. He then probes further to suggest more satisfying and compelling reasons for belief. Having explored the issue of belief in general, he turns to the question of believing that the Christian faith is true. Central to Christianity's truth claims, he argues, is the person of Jesus Christ. What can we know about him? Why should we believe what we read about him is true? Not content just to suggest reasons for belief, Sire tackles the chief reason against it - the problem of evil. No mere armchair theologian, he responds to this tough question personally as well as philosophically. Here is a book to challenge the skeptic and reassure the doubter in us all....

Title : Why Should Anyone Believe Anything at All?
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780830813971
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 239 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Why Should Anyone Believe Anything at All? Reviews

  • Eric
    2019-06-12 06:40

    I've loathed writing a review for this book, because I don't think I could do it justice.The book was quite an annoying read. The first half was (seriously) taking college students' responses to the question "Why should anyone believe anything at all?" and giving the author's two-bits on why those reasons are correct or incorrect. Basically, it covered the first week of a freshman course on epistemology. While claiming to deal with post-modern thought, it really avoids the issue by a vague rejection of the system that doesn't deal with the issues at all.The second half was perhaps even more disappointing. It was a very broad scope of Christian apologetics, but it really lacked any solid rebuttals of common attacks on Christian faith. In his own eyes the author thought he was making other worldviews look silly, but in actuality he was only making himself look that way. I kept trying to approach the book from the perspective of an atheist, agnostic, or adherent to a different religion, and I found it easy to refute or write off most or all of the author's claims.The only defense I could give for the book is that it was written in 1995 when Christian evidentialist apologetics were at their peak and more modern forms of apologetics were not widely recognized as being valuable. A book that I would recommend more is the author's "The Universe Next Door," which gives fair analysis (if not evaluation) of various worldviews. That book is what interested me in this current book.

  • Brian Watson
    2019-06-13 22:58

    This book was developed from a talk that Sire gave at over one hundred university campuses. The talk's name was the same as the book's, and Sire would have volunteers pass out index cards that had that question printed on it to students, who would then write down their answers. Their answers were placed in different categories, such as sociological reasons, psychological reasons, and religious reasons. Sire exams the different reasons offered for why anyone should believe something, and then comes to the conclusion that the only good reason to believe anything is because it's true. The second half of the book is devoted to the examination of whether Christianity is true or not. Sire focuses almost exclusively on Jesus in this section. I think this part of the book could have been more in-depth, but I don't think Sire tried to provide an exhaustive apologetic, so I'm rating the book on his goals. Some of the best chapters were devoted to the reliability of the Gospels and their account of Jesus.

  • Tejas
    2019-06-13 00:33

    Book could be summarised as follow Christianity. Taking cover of science, like sociology and philosophy, to argue the belief system in favour of adopting Christian religion is not working at all. Coming from India, following eastern philosophy of life which is less of a religion and more of a way of life, I find very difficult to grasp the need for anyone to enforce their religious viewpoints on others, persuade to convert one's belief and making forceful attempt to prove a religion is better over the other!

  • Bob Mendelsohn
    2019-06-18 01:58

    Sire does a good job in covering the lot, from philosophical and modern evaluations through reason (which he argues is itself an act of faith) to reach the biblical truths. He even deal with modern skeptic questions about the resurrection, about the reliability of the Bible, about the problem of evil and the modern search /quest for the historical Jesus. Quite good!

  • Michael
    2019-05-27 22:44

    I believe I read this one during college. I think it does a great job answering the question asked in the title.

  • Sean McGowan
    2019-06-12 05:59

    Good.

  • Kyle Scheele
    2019-06-03 04:45

    I enjoyed the first section of the book where Sire engages students across the country, the second part was just alright.

  • Eliza
    2019-06-12 22:55

    a very bias look at an objective subject - too much focus on Jesus and Christianity and why this faith is the answer to our questions and the path to a fulfilling and meaningful life

  • Alan
    2019-06-01 02:44

    I am reading it now...several years after it was published because I found it in a used book store in september.