Read The Collected Works of St. John of the Cross by San Juan de la Cruz Kieran Kavanaugh Otilio Rodriguez Online

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The fourth centenary of the death of St. John of the Cross inspired this revised edition of the English translation of his writings. The result is an edition that preserves the true meaning of the great mystic's writings, presents them as clearly as possible, and at the same time gives the reader the doctrinal and historical information that will lead to a deeper understanThe fourth centenary of the death of St. John of the Cross inspired this revised edition of the English translation of his writings. The result is an edition that preserves the true meaning of the great mystic's writings, presents them as clearly as possible, and at the same time gives the reader the doctrinal and historical information that will lead to a deeper understanding and appreciation of the teachings of the Mystical Doctor. Included in The Collected Works are St. John's poetry, The Ascent of Mount Carmel, The Dark Night, The Spiritual Canticle, and The Living Flame of Love, as well as his letters and other counsels. There is a general introduction for the entire work and brief, enlightening introductions for each specific work, explaining theme and structure. Enhancing these are the new footnotes, glossary of terms, and index....

Title : The Collected Works of St. John of the Cross
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ISBN : 9780935216141
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 814 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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The Collected Works of St. John of the Cross Reviews

  • booklady
    2019-01-08 22:10

    February 4, 2012: Restarted The Ascent Of Mount Carmel today.I haven't been reading this as quickly as I would like. A trip, school starting and a very busy time at work is causing me to pick this up, put it down and leave it for long stretches. Fortunately, this is the type of book I can do this with.Just ran across this in Book 2, Chapter 15.5...'When the spiritual person cannot meditate, let him learn to be still in God, fixing his loving attention upon Him, in the calm of his understanding, although he may think himself to be doing nothing. For thus, little by little and very quickly, Divine calm and peace will be infused into his soul, together with a wondrous and sublime knowledge of God, enfolded in Divine love. And let him not meddle with forms, meditations and imaginings, or with any kind of reasoning, lest his soul be disturbed, and brought out of its contentment and peace, which can only result in its experiencing distaste and repugnance. And if, as we have said, such a person has scruples that he is doing nothing, let him note that he is doing no small thing by pacifying the soul and bringing it into calm and peace, unaccompanied by any act or desire, for it is this that Our Lord asks of us, through David, saying: Vacate, et videte quoniam ego sum Deus. (Psalm 16:2) As though he had said: Learn to be empty of all things (that is to say, inwardly and outwardly) and you will see that I am God.' Have also been cross referencing with this translation: The Complete Works Of St. John Of The Cross, Doctor Of The Church: Spiritual Canticle, Poems I've had this book on my shelves for years and know I started Ascent of Mount Carmel sometime in the past as the first twenty pages or so are heavily highlighted. However, I never progressed past that point. Now I'm listening to the Hovel Audio edition of the book as well as reading the written text. This is allowing for a more in depth experience of the work. Although I do not know when I attempted my earlier read, I note a high degree of consistency with which I would still highlight the same key sentences/texts I marked at much earlier date. Either that indicates a lack of spiritual progress over the ensuing years or a consistent understanding of the text; I pray the former is the case.

  • David
    2019-01-24 05:17

    This is the master of Christian Spirituality and Spiritual direction. There are too many nuggets of wisdom to list. Some folks might get lost in his poetic depth. Don't let it didscrourage you because it's the kind of lost you can rest in and know that more is happening in that space than you'll ever be able to describe.

  • Zvezdana
    2019-01-25 01:16

    This is a collection of books by famous Christian spiritual teacher John of the Cross. These books are one of the best interpretations of the human spiritual path to holiness. They represent the peak of mystical theology. The books contain a detailed description and explanation of each of the mystical and contemplative stages on the path to God.For beginners on the spiritual path I would recommend especially Ascent of Mount Carmel.For all those who find themselves in life's trials and difficult and incomprehensible life situations, I would recommend the book Dark Night of the Soul.For spiritual people with mystical and contemplative experience I would recommend the books Spiritual Canticle of the Soul and The Bridegroom Christ. These last two books could be very difficult to understand, but it is worth to read them slowly and repeatedly. Anyone who has a special spiritual experiences will understand the text. It is worth to read what God has prepared for His beloved children.

  • Les Walters
    2019-01-12 03:32

    St John of the Cross is no doubt difficult to read and understand. In fact, I believe most people, including me, need some guidance with him, especially in terms of what to read first, second etc. It can be very daunting. However, John de Yepes is absolutely foundational to anyone seriously seeking union with God. There is no surer guide.I was blessed to attend a month long School of Prayer with the Carmelite Friars in Varroville, Sydney, Australia in November/December 1991...the 400th anniversary of John's death. The most memorable part was the 9 lectures or presentions on St John's writings by Fr Iain Matthew OCD, a visiting UK Carmelite friar. He really unwrapped John's teachings for me.The core of his talks are outlined in his "The Impact of God"...well worth a visit.

  • Scott Kleinpeter
    2019-01-18 00:30

    The only real heroes we have are the Saints.

  • Oscar Gonzalez
    2019-01-23 06:14

    Libro difícil, leído palmo a palmo. No por culpa del autor, claro está.El libro se basa en los poemas de San Juan de la Cruz, específicamente en tres de ellos, que, según reza la historia, primero fueron concebidos y tiempo después fueron escritos, ya que el autor se hallaba preso. Los creo y memorizó, y luego de fugarse de prisión, los escribió.Son poemas breves, bellos por sencillos, que son objeto de una detallada explicación en su sentido y simbolismo, uno en Noche oscura, otro en Cántico espiritual y otro más en Llama de amor viva. Subida del Monte Carmelo, según creo entender, con un método "más sistematizado", basado en el mismo poema de Noche oscura, aunque, según la impresión que me dejó, quedó inconcluso.Este sistema versa sobre la unión del alma con Dios. En Noche oscura trata sobre lo que es necesario lograr antes que esto suceda: poner la fe por encima de la razón, privarse de deseos y ocupaciones mundanos, suspender la memoria de todo lo que desvía nuestra atención del objetivo que nos planteamos y orientar la voluntad a conseguirlo.En Cántico espiritual, sucede la Unión, y pone advertencia de cómo darse cuenta de que esto ha sucedido. En Llama de amor viva, habla de lo que sucede posterior a ello. Todo el sistema es en segunda persona: solo se trata de lo que ha de hacerse en lo individual, no existe nada que por asomo sea colectivo o que involucre a otros, aunque no deja de recomendar las buenas obras y la práctica eclesial, pero lo hace tan brevemente que no pude evitar pensar que eso sólo lo mencionó para asegurarse el Nihil obstat.Sin ser un ermitaño-anacoreta-estilita-carmelita descalzo, puede pensarse que esta especie de “nirvana cristiano” tiene escasa utilidad práctica, por decirlo de alguna forma. No dejó de llamarme la atención también la ausencia del “amaos los unos a los otros”, sin embargo, es posible percatarse que la capacitación recibida es, a final de cuentas, sobre cómo amar.Todo el camino que se recorre, privado de cualquier distracción provocada por cosa, ser, hecho, o fenómeno, prevenido contra el maligno y advertido contra la carne, debe ser sin esperar ninguna reciprocidad, y ha de hacerse así porque estamos hechos para recorrer ese camino, porque es agradable hacerlo y por que el amado, quien quiera que sea, amerita que hagamos todo ese sacrificio, por el simple hecho de ser lo que es:Buscando mis amoresiré por esos montes y riberasni cogeré las floresni temeré las fierasy pasaré los fuertes y fronterasdice el Cántico espiritualPorque el verdadero amante entonces está contento, cuando todo lo que él es en sí, y vale y tiene y recibe, lo emplea en el amado; y cuanto más en ello es, tanto más gusto recibe en darlodice en la Llama.¿Quién no querría oír eso de sí? o mejor aún, ¿Quién no querría expresarse así de alguien?

  • Jeremy
    2019-01-08 02:11

    I read only The Dark Night of the Soul (pp. 351-457). I presented on Book 1, Chs. 12-14.A typical response could easily be to dismiss John as a neo-Gnostic who wants to get rid of the body. A more charitable view could be to view John's perspective as one of a martyr, who is reminding himself that no matter what people do to the body, he's still secure.- Dr. Donnelly mentioned Hegel's Owl of Athena (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owl_of_...) and wondered if there was a connection to the Dark Night of the Soul.- p. 401: divine wisdom blinds; we need a dark night- von Balthasar's book on prayer: it's both biblical and anthropological- Book 2, Chs. 9-14: Plato's cave analogy: looking at the sun; properties of fire (Ch. 10); Donnelly: blindness in gospel of Luke (e.g., blind Bartimaeus—not in Luke)—character in Plato's Republic; Plato just wants to turn people to the light, and gospel writers say it's a problem of blindness (issue of the will and ability)- Could the 10-step ladder (Book 2, Chs. 19-20) map onto Dante's Purgatorio, which has 7 steps? Maybe the spiritual ladder of St. John is at the top of Dante's mountain (except 2.2.5 in Dark Night mentions skipping Purgatory)- p. 446: interesting that the image John of the Cross uses to represent the soul is a body

  • Ariadna73
    2019-01-10 01:27

    Este libro hay que leerlo muy despacio y con mucho amor. Fue escrito con arduo trabajo por parte de una persona que quería explicar algo supremamente importante: cómo liberar nuestras almas de la infelicidad y conectarnos con Dios. San Juan de la cruz escribió relativamente pocos poemas; pero cuando los quiso explicar, gastó páginas y páginas tratando de dejar clara hasta la última palabra posible. San Juan de La Cruz era una especie de místico (tal vez como Krishnamurti, tal vez sufía de ataques epilépticos, quien sabe), pero lo cierto es que dedicó su vida a transmitir el mensaje del que se creía portador: el mensaje de que Dios lo es todo, y el alma está atrapada en la cárcel del cuerpo siempre soñando con el momento en que pueda "reclinar su rostro sobre el amado esposo" que en este caso es Dios; para así poder dejar el cuidado "entre las azucenas olvidado" es decir, para no tener que preocuparnos por nada, pues Dios se encargará de todo. Muy interesante y muy llamativo, pero -repito- hay que leerlo con tiempo, con paciencia y con la mente y el corazón abiertos.

  • Alex Kartelias
    2018-12-28 01:08

    No Christian has with so much detail, outlined the spiritual journey as St. John of The Cross. Indirectly commentating on the work of St. Dionysius the Areopagite, each introduces a poem and then for most of the rest of the book, expands on each word and line, universalizing the meaning in such a way that it makes the words translucent and effaced to the Hidden Truth underneath. What's also important is how he asserts that the heart is not merely a symbol for emotion, but a noetic faculty of Perception, a mirror which when purified, displays the Glory of God, where the reflection and Reflected, are fused. His work provides an enlightening bride between Catholicism and the Orthodox Church, and provides relevant instruction and advice for maneuvering up the Mounts of Purification, Illumination and Perfection.

  • Karen
    2019-01-17 05:09

    Not for merely the curious. "The Living Flame of Love" could be considered erotic by those not knowing what he was writing about, and in deed this Spanish man's love of God, is most intense. His treatise in "Dark Night of the Soul", is quite, well, pertinet. Reading 16th century literature aside, I found his writing passionate and resonating. His experiences and that of St. Teresa of Avila areparallel with the Eastern Mystics, just expressed according to their culture. I wish the rest of the world could see beyond petty differences and see that truth is not held for only a priviledged few.

  • Mauberley
    2019-01-08 04:13

    Not a book that I could read from front to back but a treasury to which I will often return. I have always felt drawn to the Saint's 'Dark Night of the Soul' poem but to read it in light of his two commentaries is to see it for the spiritual masterpiece that it is. 'Leaving my cares forgotten among the lilies' - how wonderful to be drawn joyfully from something as beautiful as lilies. A wonderful study with which to begin this year's season of Lent.

  • J. Alfred
    2019-01-20 03:20

    Very cool. Probably enjoyable even for people who don't like poetry. Confusing (the guy was a mystic, after all) but interesting. Some of his stuff, like this stanza:"This life I live in vital strengthIs loss of life unless I win You,And thus to die I shall continueUntil I in You I live at length. Listen (my God!) my life is in You!This life I do not want for, for IAm dying that I do not die."just blows my mind. Once more: very cool.

  • C.
    2019-01-22 22:19

    John of the Cross had such a precise and systematic way of describing the movements of the soul in different lights ~ consolation & desolation. I love his poetry and his commentary. So many times I felt that the words were crafted just for me ~ the resonance was so strong in my own heart, especially around the soul's deepest desire and longing: complete and utter union with God.

  • Trina
    2019-01-02 06:03

    O woods and thicketsplanted by the hand of my Beloved!O green meadow,coated, bright, with flowers,tell me, has he passed by you?Pouring out a thousand graces,he passed these groves in haste;and having looked at them,with his image alone,clothed them in beauty.You can feel the breathless quality of the prose...just beautiful!

  • Colyn
    2019-01-04 05:19

    this one will take a while. i can't decide if "The Ascent of Mount Carmel" or "The Spiritual Canticle" will be the next Fray John of the Cross that i tackle but it is all here, along with poetry, to be read at will.

  • Humphrey
    2019-01-13 23:28

    Read only selections from it. The use of both poetic form and prose explanation of the poetry allows for a heightened understanding on the reader's part, though he often beats the dead horse. Well written. He leans a bit too far away from works for my taste.

  • Msgrv Csicablenet
    2019-01-10 03:28

    Deep material!

  • Peter N Roth
    2018-12-30 01:06

    Taking this one a bit at a time.

  • Adam DeVille, Ph.D.
    2019-01-21 23:09

    Turgid and difficult in places, but a classic of Western spirituality.

  • Margaretflynn
    2019-01-21 06:20

    A classic work that has become a companion to my journey.

  • David Mullens
    2018-12-26 23:28

    Wonderful work!

  • Harry Robinson
    2019-01-07 06:17

    One of the more famous of the Christian mystics, St. John of the Cross was a contemporary of St. Teresa of Avila, and was awarded the title of Doctor of the Church. According to Wikipedia there are only 33 persons who have received this honor. The work is not an easy one to read; I find "The Ascent of Mount Carmel" extraordinarily detailed and surprisingly beautiful.I decided to list this as "read", although in truth my reading was largely skimming, and overly superficial. I'll come back to this work in the future; it has a great deal to offer.

  • Steve Gambino
    2019-01-01 03:03

    Excellent first sources and critical scholarship.

  • Ariadna73
    2019-01-03 00:26

    A must, definitely a must. This is an eye-opener book. I shall never forget this man's biography and how he lived and died according to what he believed. I loved this book!

  • Kathleen Gear
    2018-12-25 06:33

    The translation here is just elegant and brings out the sublime quality of St John's teachings.

  • Ariadna73
    2019-01-11 06:33

    Este libro hay que leerlo muy despacio y con mucho amor. Fue escrito con arduo trabajo por parte de una persona que quería explicar algo supremamente importante: cómo liberar nuestras almas de la infelicidad y conectarnos con Dios. San Juan de la cruz escribió relativamente pocos poemas; pero cuando los quiso explicar, gastó páginas y páginas tratando de dejar clara hasta la última palabra posible. San Juan de La Cruz era una especie de místico (tal vez como Krishnamurti, tal vez sufía de ataques epilépticos, quien sabe), pero lo cierto es que dedicó su vida a transmitir el mensaje del que se creía portador: el mensaje de que Dios lo es todo, y el alma está atrapada en la cárcel del cuerpo siempre soñando con el momento en que pueda "reclinar su rostro sobre el amado esposo" que en este caso es Dios; para así poder dejar el cuidado "entre las azucenas olvidado" es decir, para no tener que preocuparnos por nada, pues Dios se encargará de todo. Muy interesante y muy llamativo, pero -repito- hay que leerlo con tiempo, con paciencia y con la mente y el corazón abiertos.Aquí la primera página, donde ya se empieza con buen pie:El poema favorito, que me acercó a este santo:La última parte de este libro maravilloso, que yo adoro y que guardo con cariño para releerlo en cualquier momento y en cualquiera de sus apartes:Si te gustó este comentario (o si no), Te invito a que visites mi blog: http://lunairereadings.blogspot.com

  • djt
    2019-01-19 23:23

    Started re-reading this book nearly 8 mths. ago (had previously read 1/2 of the book several years ago) & started from the beginning again, and have been reading it little-by-little, to say the least; finally completed it today. The book contains the writing, prose, poetry of St. John of The Cross, as well as several of his letters. His works are excellent, and gave it only 4 stars, and not 5, because of the repeated phrases and points of emphasis, that may have been his writing style, or a result of the translation; not sure. This caused a lot of the reading to become tedious to me; however, I wanted to read it all, very thoroughly, so wound up re-reading many paragraphs throughout the book. It was worth it (to me) in the long run, since it clarified some of his written thoughts. What's most often spoken of is his "Dark Night of The Soul." When it's discussed, "dark night" is usually presented as meaning our trials and tribulations and suffering. While this is a part of what he's describing, these difficulties we experience are not the "dark night" but instead a means of being given the opportunity to experience the "dark night." Very briefly (and almost impossible to be brief with this, but will try) what I found to be two major parts of the "Dark Night" he explains are: First: the awareness of God, through our deepening faith, casting a light on the darkness (sinfulness) of our souls; revealing our failings to us, therefore causing us to become remorseful, anxious, but then leading us to seek forgiveness and reparation. Second: The understanding of seeing our trials, and tribulations, as a means of redemptive suffering, where despite all obstacles and adversity, we retain and strengthen our faith, instead of abandoning all hope. All of St. John's works included in this book, of course, rely heavily upon the main theme of his spirituality which is acceptance of abandonment and detachment in our lives, and coming to the goal of "nada, nada, nada" a complete emptying of ourselves of material and personal attachments to allow our souls to be filled with God's presence. Of course, none of this comes easily and he uses his prose and poetry to help describe his spirituality in a very beautiful way. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone seeking to grow in contemplative prayer and spirituality. It's also a good read for those experiencing personal loss, trauma, sufferings because it gives a strong perspective on the importance of turning toward God, instead of away from God during these times to help overcome the pain and sorrow. Last, just as a book to read, I'd recommend it because of the beautiful language…really very nice.

  • Adam Gossman
    2019-01-22 04:27

    My soul leapt at the reading and already longs to read it again!!! Praise God for this book!

  • Gnome Books
    2019-01-18 04:06

    go to school and never return

  • Ryan
    2019-01-12 06:03

    I will not comment on St. John's writing; he does not need my recommendation. This edition of his works is excellent. I especially appreciate the introductions and organization. If you appreciate St. John of the Cross, get this book immediately, you will not regret it.