Read Abel Sánchez and Other Stories by Miguel de Unamuno Online

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Delve into three of Spanish philosopher Miguel de Unamuno's most haunting parables. This essential Unamuno reader begins with the full-length novel Abel Sanchez, a modern retelling of the story of Cain and Abel. Also included are two remarkable short stories, The Madness of Doctor Montarco and San Manuel Bueno, Martyr, featuring quixotic, philosophically existential characDelve into three of Spanish philosopher Miguel de Unamuno's most haunting parables. This essential Unamuno reader begins with the full-length novel Abel Sanchez, a modern retelling of the story of Cain and Abel. Also included are two remarkable short stories, The Madness of Doctor Montarco and San Manuel Bueno, Martyr, featuring quixotic, philosophically existential characters confronted by the dull ache of modernity.Translated by Anthony Kerrigan and with an insightful introduction by Mario J. Valdes...

Title : Abel Sánchez and Other Stories
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ISBN : 9780895267078
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 267 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Abel Sánchez and Other Stories Reviews

  • Ben Winch
    2018-11-24 12:19

    Stark, dialogue-based, rarely descriptive and lacking plot, the three pieces in this collection (a novel, a novella, a short story) are nonetheless compelling in their stark, heartfelt urgency. A rector at the University of Salamanca in Spain at the turn of the 20th century, many times relieved of his post and given it back again, also deported to the Canary Islands for ‘attacks on the Monarchy’, Unamuno was a man made well aware of the dangers of truth-telling.What has happened? Simply that five people have already approached me to ask what I meant by writing the piece of fiction I have just published, what I intended to say, and what bearing did it have. Idiots, idiots, and thrice idiots! They’re worse than children who break dolls to find out what’s inside... They believe no-one could write except to prove something, or defend or attack some proposition, or from an ulterior motive... (‘The Madness of Doctor Montarco’.)Like the good doctor, I also have an aversion to such analysis. I don’t much care what the ‘themes’ of a piece of fiction are. Montarco’s psychiatrist puts it so:I have been reading his work since he has been here and I realise that one of their mistakes was to take him for a man of ideas, a writer of ideas, when fundamentally he is no such thing. His ideas were a point of departure, mere raw material, and had as much importance in his writing as earth used by Velasquez in making the pigments had to do with his painting, or as the type of stone Michelangelo used had to do with his Moses... At best, ideas are no more than raw material, as I’ve already said, for works of art, or for philosophy, or for polemics.So, the themes – the types of stone – in this case are: a retelling of Cain and Abel with the focus on Cain (why it’s called ‘Abel Sanchez’ I don’t know); a portrait of a modern so-called saint and his struggle with his unbelief in a small village; a portrait of a lucid writer/doctor unable to reconcile the two strands of his public persona and committed to an asylum. But what makes the stories is their usage of these themes as springboards to whatever it is that occurs to Unamo as he muses on these beginnings. In tone they remind of mid-career Hesse – Demian especially – though starker and rarely lyrical. And it’s not hard to see how people might have reacted to them as Doctor Montarco’s readers reacted to his writings, because the focus on debating voices gives them a tone something like a work of philosophy, in which the thrust of the argument is all important. To me, again, this is immaterial. To me, it was the magical suggestion of something – lives, a world – beyond the dialogue that kept me reading. And the determination to be true to this world, to the conception. And the fact that the argument had two sides, and evolved. Despite an occasional sense of the monochrome or (in terms of the descriptive fleshing-out of a world) the one-dimensional, these are good works, intent on a truth beyond politics or sociology. As translator Anthony Kerrigan says: ‘As regards a terrible and troubled honesty, their like is seldom seen.’

  • Bahar
    2018-12-15 08:25

    خوآکین در داستان هابیل، و قدیس مانوئل در داستان آخر، شباهت های شخصیتی زیادی داشتند اما شیوه ی زندگی بسیار متفاوتشون قابل تامل بود که یکی قدیس شد و دیگری قابیل! دو داستان جذاب و خواندنی بودند."هیچ رازی غریب تر از این برف تماشا کرده ای که در دریاچه جان میبازد و برای کوه بالاپوش می بافد؟"-از داستان قدیس مانوئل نیکوکار شهید-داستان مرد مردستان هم یک عاشقانه ی جالب بود.

  • Jeremy
    2018-12-03 15:20

    In tone and simplicity of form ABEL SANCHEZ reads like a negation of or counterpart to Hesse's SIDDHARTHA. It's the parable of a man's lifelong struggle for inner peace, only instead of slowly climbing toward transcendence, Joaquin's trajectory is a downward spiral through increasingly intense stages of agonizing envy. It gets ugly and disturbing at times, like a Dostoevsky novel. Spain considers Unamuno one of their absolute greatest writers; ABEL is only the tip of the iceberg. It's a shame that so much of his work (and a great deal of modernist Spanish lit in general) isn't available in accessible trade editions for the English reader.

  • Fatemeh
    2018-12-03 10:03

    کل کتاب شامل سه داستان بود که داستان قدیس مانوئل را قبلا در کتابی مجزا خوانده بودم. در کل بد نبود. نویسنده حالات درونی افراد رو خیلی خوب به تصویر کشیده بود علی الخصوص در داستان هابیل ولی بنظرم درخشانترین اینها همون داستان قدیس شهید باشه.

  • مسعود حسینی
    2018-11-17 13:25

    شاهکار! بخصوص مرد مردان و هابیل

  • Amir Azad
    2018-11-21 14:02

    عمیقا به داستان‌هایی با بن‌مایه الاهیاتی و فلسفی علاقه‌مندم. این کتاب به ویژه داستان‌های سوم و اولش بی‌اندازه دقیق و پر ارجاع و نکته پردازانه بود. کشیش مانوئل شهید به خوبی به تقابل تقلیل مرارت و تقریر حقیقت پرداخته بود. حبذا

  • Foad
    2018-12-13 12:10

    داستان هابيل، خيلى عالى بود، ولى اواخرش بيش از حد طولانى شد و از نفس افتاد.داستان مرد مردستان، به رغم گنگ بودن شخصيت هاش، نمونه ى بسيار زيبايى از داستان عاشقانه بود.داستان قديس مانوئل هم كه نيازى به تعريف نداره، داستانى كه يك تنه صليب تكفير و ارتداد رو بر دوش نويسنده ش گذاشت!نكته ى جالبى كه به نظرم رسيد، اين بود كه قديس مانوئل و قابيل (يا خوآكين، در داستان هابيل) هر دو شخصيت هاى مشابهى داشتن، درك مشابهى از انسان و جهان داشتن، ولى دو رويكرد كاملاً متفاوت رو پيش گرفتن: يكى قديس شد و اون يكى قابيل.

  • Zeinab A I
    2018-12-05 08:11

    در داستان اول، از دو دوست گفته می شود که آنقدر به هم نزدیکند که به برادر می مانند. اما حسادت کم کم بین شان شکل می گیرد و تا آخر عمر همراهشان است.داستان دوم درباره عشق افسانه ای یک مرد است.و داستان سوم درباره کشیشی که همه را به راه ِ نیک هدایت می کند اما خود ایمان ندارد.مبالغه هایی در هر سه داستان وجود دارد. داستان اول، برجسته ترین داستان کتاب است. و به نظر من گفتگو های زیبایی در کتاب وجود دارد. و داستان به زیبایی نقل می شود اما زیادی طولانی می شود و همین باعث شد که داستان، جذابیت ِ زیادش را برایم از دست بدهد.

  • حانیه
    2018-12-10 09:59

    سه تا داستانی که هر 3تاش رو دوست داشتم. به خصوص داستان آخر که درباره کشیشی هست که مردم خیلی دوستش دارن، اما خودش به اصول مذهبی که به مردم آموزش میده اعتقاد نداره. داستان اول هم تقابل یک هابیل و قابیل در عصر حاضر هست. قابیل در تمام عمرش به هابیل حسادت می کنه و نهایتا هم او رو میکشه. نویسنده سعی داره بگه که خود هابیل در حسادت های قابیل مقصر بوده. داستان جالبی است.

  • Mehdi khani
    2018-12-16 13:06

    مجموعۀ سه داستان کوتاه به نامهای هابیل،مردِ مردستان و قدیس مانوئل،نیکوکار شهید که این آخری را بیش از دو داستان دیگه دوست داشتممردم به ندرت می دانند حقیقت ایمان چیست و چندان در غم دانستنش هم نیستنداو یکی از ما بود که از شدت زندگی مردزندگی باید بپایدتا یک روز که ما مردگان نیز برای همیشه بمیریم

  • Mohammad Hossein Haqiqat khah
    2018-12-15 08:01

    چندین بار خوانده ام، هابیل ترحم‌برانگیز و مرد مردستان آزاردهنده و قدیس مانوئیل تکان‌دهنده.اونامونو در نگاشتن این کتاب بسیار از کتاب دیگر خود درد جاودانگی وام گرفته و دیالوگ‌های بسیاری در داستان‌ها نقل قول‌های کتاب دیگر اوست.حکایت ایمان قدیس و تقلای حسادت‌آلود و رقق‌بار خوآکین واقعاً تأمل‌برانگیز است.

  • blakeR
    2018-12-03 09:06

    This is the first book I've read of Unamuno's and it reminded me strongly of his German contemporary Herman Hesse (particularly of two of the stories from Klingsors letzter Sommer, and to a lesser extent Steppenwolf and Narcissus and Goldmund). There were also veins that Camus would later mine, especially in The Fall. Those are the frames of reference I brought to these three unique stories that made them seem pleasantly familiar. Unamuno's subject matter is decidedly psychological, the action of these stories taking place primarily in the heads of their chief characters. Yet he is equally preoccupied with philosophy, theology and morality. I read the stories chronologically ("Madness of Doctor Montarco" followed by "Abel Sanchez" and then "San Manuel Bueno") to be able to better appreciate Unamuno's development. And I always read the introduction last, a habit I recommend to others as well since you can only appreciate a commentary on something after you've read that something. . . one of my perpetual gripes with the entire publishing tradition : )All of the stories deal with exceptional individuals who struggle to reconcile their compulsions to self-expression with the perceptions of society ("Abel" takes a somewhat different path). Dr. Montarco is a superb physician who needs to release his maniacal urges through subversive literature, facing distastrous consequences when stymied. Joaquín Monegro is a superb physician who is tormented by the easy fortune of his lifelong friend Abel Sanchez. Don Manuel is a superb priest who sacrifices himself in order to satisfy the needs of his parishioners. You get the feeling that all of these protagonists are autobiographical, and they each deal with different sins, perhaps progressing as Unamuno did over his life: the sin of pride early on, followed by envy, and finally loss of faith.The richness of these stories revolves around these three moral dilemmas, and there is much to consider and decide with respect to each one. The apparent message of the last story is particularly depressing, that religion should be the opium of the masses, that this is a righteous path. I disagree. For happiness, yes, this would be correct, because ignorance is bliss. But I don't believe that happiness is the most important thing in life.The stories are very thought-provoking and suffer in enjoyability only because there is so little action. The goings-on are all related as conversations or inner monologues. But still, the man has impressed me and I look forward to reading Niebla next. Still, the most impressive aspect of Unamuno remains the quote that first brought his name to my attention, when in 1936 he replied to a fascist speech by General Millán-Astray at the university where he would later have to resign. This is what he said:You are waiting for my words. You know me well, and know I cannot remain silent for long. Sometimes, to remain silent is to lie, since silence can be interpreted as assent. . . But now I have heard this insensible and necrophilous oath, "¡Viva la Muerte!", and I, having spent my life writing paradoxes that have provoked the ire of those who do not understand what I have written, and being an expert in this matter, find this ridiculous paradox repellent. General Millán-Astray is a cripple. There is no need for us to say this with whispered tones. He is a war cripple. So was Cervantes. But unfortunately, Spain today has too many cripples. And, if God does not help us, soon it will have very many more. It torments me to think that General Millán-Astray could dictate the norms of the psychology of the masses. A cripple, who lacks the spiritual greatness of Cervantes, hopes to find relief by adding to the number of cripples around him. [Millán-Astray responded, "¡Muera la inteligencia! ¡Viva la Muerte!" ("Death to intelligence! Long live death!"), provoking applause from the Falangists.][Unamuno continued] This is the temple of intelligence, and I am its high priest. You are profaning its sacred domain. You will win, because you have enough brute force. But you will not convince. In order to convince it is necessary to persuade, and to persuade you will need something that you lack: reason and right in the struggle. I see it is useless to ask you to think of Spain. I have spoken.He was escorted to safety by Franco's wife, and then removed from his post at the University of Salamanca. He died 10 weeks later.Thus anything I read by Unamuno will be colored by my knowledge that the man was a bonafide hero.Not Bad Reviews@blakerosser1

  • Dustin
    2018-11-16 15:24

    I picked this one up randomly when i recognized the title as something someone had recommended to me once.First i read the recommended content: Saint Emmanuel the Good, Martyr. Therein, St. Emmanuel gradually divulges his terrible secret to the narrator, a devoted young female follower of the Saint. The tragic unearthing of the Saint's lifelong and present disbelief in God overshadows his heroic dedication to the ideal that he has none the less chosen to represent and teach to his spiritual followers. "The truth? The truth, Lazarus, is perhaps something so unbearable, so terrible, something so deadly, that simple people could not live with it!""As for true religion, all religions are true as long as they give spiritual life to the people who profess them, as long as they console them for having been born only to die."It is not deception, the way he has lived, because the object of religion is to console people of the macabre nature of things and confirm them in their faith, for faith and "to have done good, to have feigned good, even in dreams, is something which is not lost.""There are two types of dangerous and harmful men: those who, convinced of life beyond the grave, of the resurrection of the flesh, torment other people - like the inquisitors they are - so that they will despise this life as a transitory thing and work for the other life; and then, there are those who...look forward to some vague future society and exert every effort to prevent the populace finding consoling joy from belief in another world."These are the two spiritual evils.The next story, The Madness of Doctor Montarco, has some fascinating insights on the nature of madness and its connection to genius as well as the vanity of the common, progressive, evolutionary man."For the truth is, my friend, that when a man tries to get ahead of others he is simply trying to save himself. When a man tries to drown out the names of other men he is merely trying to insure that his own be preserved in the memory of living men, because he knows that posterity is a close-meshed sieve which allows few names to et through to other ages."This is interesting because it allows man to be simply selfish by nature, not necessarily evil or malicious in intent or nature, just built to wish for immortality, but in seeking this otherwise unrelated wish, he (nearly blindly) does bad things to his neighbors in the way. "The limitation of the public is that they want everything given to them already masticated, predigested, and made up into capsules ready to be swallowed.""The greatest difference between the sane and the insane, is that the sane, even though they may occasionally have mad thoughts, neither express them nor carry them out, while the insane - unless they are hopeless, in which case they do not think mad thoughts at all - have no power of inhibition, no ability to contain themselves...[Man] must know how to control himself. And if he doesn't know, he evolves into a madman or a genius."The main story in the collection, Abel Sanchez, is a seedy tale of two friends where one succeeds in everything and the other designs his whole life only to trump the fame and happiness of the other. "Action liberates one and dissipates poisoned sentiment, and it is poisoned sentiment which sickens the soul."This is the attitude Saint Emmanuel had also, staying busy at all times doing good works and talking to people so that he would never be alone to think, for idleness is the devil's playground. This is a variation of the old proverb, "time heals all ills," except that it prescribes one to keep busy, keep swimming, if you will, so that you will not have to think, to brood, to swell, to boil into hate and the tragedy inherent in solitude. Unamuno takes another shot at the common man through Abel, saying, "Don't deceive yourself, Joaquin, those ideas which are called dangerous, daring, impious, are merely those that never suggest themselves to the poor routine intelligences, the people who don't have even a grain of personal initiative or originality, but do have 'common sense' -and vulgarity."

  • Deborah Schuff
    2018-11-24 08:03

    My mother was cleaning out her own books and gave me this one. I enjoyed reading Abel Sanchez and found it a thought-provoking parable of Cain and Abel. The two novellas were good as well. I hadn't heard of de Unamuno before and was curious about him. Here's something I found on Wikipedia which demonstrates his character: On 12 October 1936 the celebration of Columbus Day had brought together a politically diverse crowd at the University of Salamanca, including Enrique Pla y Deniel, the Archbishop of Salamanca, and Carmen Polo Martínez-Valdés, the wife of Franco, Falangist General José Millán Astray and Unamuno himself. According to the British historian Hugh Thomas in his magnum opus The Spanish Civil War (1961), the evening began with an impassioned speech by the Falangist writer José María Pemán. After this, Professor Francisco Maldonado decried Catalonia and the Basque Country as "cancers on the body of the nation," adding that "Fascism, the healer of Spain, will know how to exterminate them, cutting into the live flesh, like a determined surgeon free from false sentimentalism."From somewhere in the auditorium, someone cried out the motto "¡Viva la Muerte!" (Long live death!). As was his habit, Millán-Astray responded with "¡España!" (Spain!); the crowd replied with "¡Una!" (One!). He repeated "¡España!"; the crowd then replied "¡Grande!" (Great!). A third time, Millán-Astray shouted "¡España!"; the crowd responded "Libre!" (Free!) This –Spain, one, great and free–was a common Falangist cheer and would become a francoist motto thereafter. Later, a group of uniformed Falangists entered, saluting the portrait of Franco that hung on the wall.Unamuno, who was presiding over the meeting, rose up slowly and addressed the crowd: "You are waiting for my words. You know me well, and know I cannot remain silent for long. Sometimes, to remain silent is to lie, since silence can be interpreted as assent. I want to comment on the so-called speech of Professor Maldonado, who is with us here. I will ignore the personal offence to the Basques and Catalonians. I myself, as you know, was born in Bilbao. The Bishop," Unamuno gestured to the Archbishop of Salamanca, "whether you like it or not, is Catalan, born in Barcelona. But now I have heard this insensible and necrophilous oath, "¡Viva la Muerte!", and I, having spent my life writing paradoxes that have provoked the ire of those who do not understand what I have written, and being an expert in this matter, find this ridiculous paradox repellent. General Millán-Astray is a cripple. There is no need for us to say this with whispered tones. He is war cripple. So was Cervantes. But unfortunately, Spain today has too many cripples. And, if God does not help us, soon it will have very many more. It torments me to think that General Millán-Astray could dictate the norms of the psychology of the masses. A cripple, who lacks the spiritual greatness of Cervantes, hopes to find relief by adding to the number of cripples around him."Millán-Astray responded: "¡Muera la inteligencia! ¡Viva la Muerte!" ("Death to intelligence! Long live death!"), provoking applause from the Falangists. Pemán, in an effort to calm the crowd, exclaimed "¡No! ¡Viva la inteligencia! ¡Mueran los malos intelectuales!" ("No! Long live intelligence! Death to the bad intellectuals!")Unamuno continued: "This is the temple of intelligence, and I am its high priest. You are profaning its sacred domain. You will win [venceréis], because you have enough brute force. But you will not convince [pero no convenceréis]. In order to convince it is necessary to persuade, and to persuade you will need something that you lack: reason and right in the struggle. I see it is useless to ask you to think of Spain. I have spoken." Millán-Astray, controlling himself, shouted "Take the lady's arm!" Unamuno took Carmen Polo by the arm and left in her protection. After reading this, I found that I liked him very much and will be looking into reading more of his works.

  • Zach
    2018-12-11 10:04

    Abel Sanchez is a powerfully stirring novel that explores jealousy raised to the level of psychosis through a devastating retelling of Cain & Abel. Unamuno's writing draws me in so fully that the perspectives and transformative moments he allows seem endless.Miguel de Unamuno once stated that the aim of all his writing was to stir up the sediment in people's hearts. This collection, including two short stories, The Madness of Doctor Montarco & San Manuel Bueno, Martyr, as well as the aforementioned novel, Abel Sanchez, masterfully demonstrates this aim and does so while Unamuno employs powers of creativity, storytelling, use of language, and characterization that I have scarcely experienced elsewhere. The stirring of the sediment can feel like a hurricane.

  • Danielle
    2018-11-20 15:09

    I honestly cannot even explain why I liked this book as much as I did. I had to read it for my Modern European Novel course and devoured it in a few hours despite the fact that I did not particularly like any of the characters. The miniscule amount sympathy I felt for Joaquin was lost the more I read. In fact, the further I got into the novel and saw more of his character and personality, the more I grew to dislike him. He was just a sad, miserable man full of hatred and envy. He had a life that people would be envious of, yet he was blinded by his jealousy; he wanted what he could not have.The only characters in the story I liked were Antonia, Joaquin's unfortunate wife, and their daughter and son-in-law. Antonia I felt extremely sorry for. She was a devout Christian woman and loved Joaquin despite knowing that he did not return her love and possibly was incapable of ever doing so. She pitied him and thought her love would be able to save and salvage him. Unfortunately, Joaquin was too consumed with his hatred towards Abel and Helena. Again, I don't know why I devoured this book. Normally it takes me awhile to get through books I am forced to read, yet I just had to finish this one today for I could not stop reading it. Its especially strange because it was a parallel to the biblical Cain and Abel story. Not being a religious person myself, I always hesitate when reading something with a biblical premise, only because I don't have much knowledge of the Bible myself to help in understanding the connection. Thankfully, the story of Cain and Abel is one I have studied before.

  • Sarah
    2018-12-03 16:11

    Abel Sanchez is a re-telling of the Biblical story of Cain and Abel, only Cain is named Joaquin in this version. They are raised together from birth. Abel becomes a famous artist and Joaquin is a successful physician, but Joaquin is fiercely jealous of Abel. This jealousy controls Joaquin's whole existence and most of his actions are in response to something Abel has done. Life between them becomes a competition according to Joaquin and he is eaten up that Abel doesn't see it this way. I liked this story but as a story of obsession, I thought it kind of droned on and became redundant. It read like a tale of functioning madness. I didn't find either of the main characters sympathetic, and therefore really did not become invested in their story. I also liked the style in which it is written.The other longer story is Saint Emmanuel the Good, Martyr. It tells the story of Emmanuel, the holy man of a small town in Spain. He is beloved by the people of the village and inspires non-believers to follow him. Turns out, he does not believe what he preaches & he confides this to the narrator's brother, who in turn, confides this miserable secret to the narrator. Emmanuel will not share his personal views with the general public; instead, he incites their belief as it is his view that religion can be a positive aspect in people's lives. It is ironic that a person who did not belive could provide so much comfort to those around him. It plays on illusion and deceit. I loved the atmosphere of the story and again, the confessional style of delivery.

  • Semnebune
    2018-12-12 13:08

    Mi-am petrecut toată viața scriind despre paradoxuri și atrăgându-mi furia celor care nu înțeleg ceea ce am scris. Acestea sunt vorbele lui Unamuno, autor din Țara Bascilor care și-a dedicat mare parte din viață studiului lui Don Quijote.Cartea apărută la All include două nuvele. Prima dintre ele, Abel Sanchez, dezvoltă mitul biblic al lui Cain și Abel, la care autorul spaniol a adăugat un strop de ying și yang sau o continuă pendulare între binele și răul din interiorul celor două personaje principale, Abel Sanchez și Joaquin Monegro.A doua nuvelă, Sfântul Manuel Cel Bun, despre care voi vorbi în continuare, este construită ca un omagiu/tribut pentru duhovnicul din Valverde de Lucerna. Vocea narativă aparține Angelitei, o fată care îl cunoaște de aproape pe părintele Manuel, care i-a sprijinit familia după dispariția tatălui și după plecarea fratelui acesteia în America de Sud . Nuvela prezintă atât modul lui don Manuel de a conduce comunitatea, cât și momentele în care acesta se îndoiește de credința sa.Acesta acționează adesea diferit de dogmă, în special când vine vorba de suicid . Părintele Manuel nu vede cu ochi buni nici morțile infantile.de la sursă: un sfant cu picioarele pe pamant – SemneBune http://semnebune.ro/2012/un-sfant-cu-...

  • Jim Fonseca
    2018-12-16 10:26

    We are treated to three short stories; or, more properly, a novella and two short stories written in the early 1900's and translated from the Spanish. (The author is Basque.) All three stories have religious overtones (Abel is part of a Cain and Abel envy parody) and all three revolve around men that some might consider "mad." (One of the three dies in an asylum.) Like Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, the stories reflect ideas from the newly developing field of psychology that was spreading though Europe.The novella, which has the same title as the book, is about an imagined rivalry between two men. I say imagined, because it exists only in the mind of one of the men. But it lasts his entire life, from youth, when he was rejected by a young woman who married the man that became his rival, until he is on his death bed. The rivalry consumes him even as the two men maintain a surface friendship throughout their lives. In another story, a very good doctor publishes bizarre fiction. His writing impacts his practice and he can't figure out why. The third story is about a priest, so kindly and religious, and such a master at bringing unbelievers into the church, that he is considered a local saint. Yet his burden in life is that that he doesn't believe in God.

  • angie
    2018-11-22 11:11

    I first read this in 1990, while taking a college course in existentialist literature. Pulling Abel Sanchez off my shelf this afternoon, I notice how much of the highlights I made decades ago are as philosophically relevant as ever...of course, it is considered a classic in many circles so that makes sense.But, oh, the beauty of the prose (this translation is by Anthony Kerrigan):"His usual thesis was that nothing was known for certain in medicine, that everything was hypothetical and a constant raveling and unraveling, that distrust was the most justified emotion."I was especially "angsty" during this period of my life, so I'm not surprised a lot of the underlined passages speak to identity, real vs. unreal and moral imperatives. What does surprise me now is how much of it I would still highlight today. Abel Sanchez is one of those rare books that is both painful and comforting to read, timeless and beautiful as well...

  • Liz
    2018-11-28 11:17

    I initially read this book in Spanish, for a college course, and I thought it would be fun to read it again. I remember being impressed with the story, San Manuel Bueno, Martyr, at the time (if I understood what I was reading), and the priest's crisis of faith, which I was experiencing at the same time. Abel Sanchez, I did not remember at all, so it was interesting to read again. Abel Sanchez is really about his friend, Joaquin Monegro, and the jealousy Joaquin feels all of his life for Abel. His intensity and irrationality actually reminded me of a couple of Henry's cousins, but that is a story for another day. Both of the stories are probably more impactful if you are studying the time in Spain when they were written.

  • Anthony Rivera
    2018-11-25 12:59

    Joaquin Montenegro spends his entire life wallowing in his own self pity only to find that the life that he led chasing after his counterpart Abel Sanchez was meaningless.This story reminds me of the stubbornness of Captain Ahab in Moby Dick and the obsession invested in Jay Gatsby in The Great Gatsby. These characters inevitably fulfill this fate and can never escape it.

  • BABAK
    2018-11-26 13:28

    میراث خواران هابیل یعنی هابیلکها جهنم را علم کرده اند که ماوای قابیلکها باشد زیرا اگر چنین مقر مخوفی وجود نداشته باشد هابیلکها شکوه و جلالشان را بی رونق میابند. خوشی و دلخوشی آنها در این است که دیگران رنج ببرند و خودشان آسوده و برکنار باشند

  • Lexi Diaz
    2018-12-14 16:12

    Abel Sanchez was entertaining! Stories of envy and how it turns humans into a mess of feelings are important and enlightening.

  • Ed
    2018-11-22 12:24

    I very strongly identified with the main character in two of the three stories here. De Unamuno deserves to be better known than he is to American readers.

  • Mesbah Khandan
    2018-11-23 16:14

    به نظرِ من مقدمه‌ی نسبتا مفصلِ ابتدای کتاب را در آخر و پس از مطالعه‌ی سه داستان بخوانید

  • Fahime
    2018-12-07 08:12

    در دسته کتاب هایی که یواش یواش «شک کردن» را به من یاد داد

  • Elizabeth
    2018-11-21 12:03

    From the writer of The Tragic Sense of Life.

  • Xrisstinah
    2018-11-20 12:27

    El mejor retrato de la envidia que he leído.

  • Kave
    2018-12-04 10:02

    on dastaane dovomesh kheeili khodas