Read The Highs & Lows of Little Five: A History of Little Five Points by Robert Hartle Jr. Online

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Atlanta's Little Five Points, the city's first Neighborhood Commercial District, stands out as one of the most distinctive shopping districts in the Southeast. There have been quite a few ups and downs in the area's history, but ultimately the dedicated, passionate individuals who made L5P what it is today handled them with perseverance and foresight, creating unique, indeAtlanta's Little Five Points, the city's first Neighborhood Commercial District, stands out as one of the most distinctive shopping districts in the Southeast. There have been quite a few ups and downs in the area's history, but ultimately the dedicated, passionate individuals who made L5P what it is today handled them with perseverance and foresight, creating unique, independently owned stores that draw the most eclectic mix of people found anywhere in Atlanta. The cultural melting pot created by these stores is what makes Little Five Points such a popular destination for both locals and tourists. Join author Robert Hartle Jr. as he tells the story of the revitalization of Little Five Points, including firsthand accounts from longtime L5P business owners who were actually there and who helped to save the area from the many threats to its survival....

Title : The Highs & Lows of Little Five: A History of Little Five Points
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781596298743
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 126 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Highs & Lows of Little Five: A History of Little Five Points Reviews

  • Eric Moebius
    2018-12-02 21:44

    sigh. I am sure that Mr. Hartle did a lot of research, and while I do appreciate the effort. It was like reading a history that cut out the majority of the participants, and when it did actually address the locals it made rather egregious mistakes... For example: to call Denise Damron a skinhead is like calling a Mennonite Amish. Sure, they kinda look the same, but there are some big ideological differences. Actually there are big ideological differences between types of Skinhead even. Robert Hartle wondered why there were all these skinheads with black members. This is because some were S.H.A.R.P.S (Skin heads against racial prejudice), others might have been Straight Edge (anti-drugs), but Denise Damron was neither one.It is easy for rural Georgians to label her a Skinhead because they don't know what anything is and so a poor use of the vernacular is to be expected, but if you are writing about these people it would be better you actually try to understand this stuff.Denise was a punk rocker. Her boyfriend "Dred" Ed, was called that because he had Dred locks; not exactly a skinhead. His hair went past his shoulders. They used to sleep on the rooftops of the Mellow Mushroom before it became the Bridgetown Grill, along with another guy named Rob, and... me... We also had long hair. I am not a skinhead. If I had to label myself it would have been a Metal head, or a street poet.The issue with Che and Indris Golden is... They were douchebags who swung on a girl. They were school teachers and they they happened to be black. Chris one of the two kids spanging them had said," Hey Playah, Playah, Playah, c'mon off some of that loot, and..." They didn't like it that a white guy was addressing them in "street lingo." Also, the cops were looking for someone to pin "Georgia's new Hate Crime Law" on. Che and his brother swung on Chris and his girlfriend. Chris was... kinda a d*ck. He probably deserved to get his *ss beat. Only the neighborhood protected local girls. This is why those guys got stomped, and one of them got a dred lock torn out. Chris and his girl were getting beat up by two guys. You think Chris and his girl could have beat two guys down??!? No... When the locals saw it, a bunch of people jumped on them. FIVE other people including Ulysses, who is Hispanic. His girlfriend's name is Rachel. The others were just smart enough to leave. The cops didn't want to take testimony from anyone if it didn't add up to the narrative that they were looking for... I was there....As to the Fred Newbaum incident... The Fred the Crimefighter narrative is cute, but... Fred was a crackhead, and... If I believe what I am told which (my girlfriend Becky was sitting between Rob and Tim when they were shot) I feel is from a more credible source... Rob and Tim ripped off Fred and his wife on some drugs, and then... made fun of him and his wife. like... "What are you gonna do about it?" So... He did something. Also, afterwards he went into the... I want to say it was the Pub again by that point, and ordered a beer.You also left out the murder of Chad Brown, and Joeanne who worked at Sevenanda. So, you know... The reason it is still a horrible crime area... aside from the tremendous poverty, is that the way the laws are written. The cops tend to run off the artists, crafters, and street vendors; who actually helped keep crime in check by their very presence. The business owners were worried about competition, but ended up in many ways cutting their own throat... by running out people who came to do business, by making the local part an uncomfortable place to hang out with almost no benches, and crap metal rails keeping people off the grass.

  • Jeff Crompton
    2018-11-21 16:04

    A fascinating little book, although it might not mean much to folks who don't live in Atlanta. It's not a comprehensive history of Little Five Points, but primarily an account of its revitalization.I live a mile from Little Five Points, the crossroads which is Atlanta's center of the unconventional, the independent, and the just plain weird. L5P grew as a shopping district for Inman Park, an upscale neighborhood that was Atlanta's first suburb in the 19th century, and the adjacent town of Edgewood, which is now the Candler Park neighborhood of Atlanta, and my home. I love Little Five, but was unaware of the extent to which it deteriorated during the 1960s and 1970s, and how hard a handful of people, primarily real estate developer Kelly Jordan, worked to revitalize the area. L5P's two wonderful theaters, which now house the Variety Playhouse and the Seven Stages Theater, were literally one day away from demolition when, assisted by a phone call from the mayor, Jordan convinced the owner to lease him the theaters.I thought that this book might very well be dry or boring, but I found it to be inspiring. Hartle occasionally injects himself into the writing unnecessarily, in a magazine-article kind of way, but the book works in spite of that. I've got some new heroes now, and I'll think about them the next time I walk up to Criminal Records or the Euclid Avenue Yacht Club.