Read Burial for a King: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Funeral and the Week that Transformed Atlanta and Rocked the Nation by Rebecca Burns Online

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In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, riots broke out in 110 cities across the country. For five days, Atlanta braced for chaos while preparing to host King’s funeral. An unlikely alliance of former student radicals, the middle-aged patrician mayor, the no-nonsense police chief, black ministers, white churchgoers, Atlanta’s business leaders, KinIn the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, riots broke out in 110 cities across the country. For five days, Atlanta braced for chaos while preparing to host King’s funeral. An unlikely alliance of former student radicals, the middle-aged patrician mayor, the no-nonsense police chief, black ministers, white churchgoers, Atlanta’s business leaders, King’s grieving family members, and his stunned SCLC colleagues worked to keep Atlanta safe, honor a murdered hero, and host the tens of thousands who came to pay tribute. On April 9, 1968, 150,000 mourners took part in a daylong series of rituals honoring King—the largest funeral staged for a private U.S. citizen. King’s funeral was a dramatic event that took place against a national backdrop of war protests and presidential politics in a still-segregationist South, where Georgia’s governor surrounded the state capitol with troops and refused to lower the flag in acknowledgment of King’s death. Award-winning journalist Rebecca Burns delivers a riveting account of this landmark week and chronicles the convergence of politicians, celebrities, militants, and ordinary people who mourned in a peaceful Atlanta while other cities burned. Drawing upon copious research and dozens of interviews— from staffers at the White House who dealt with the threat of violence to members of King’s family and inner circle—Burns brings this dramatic story to life in vivid scenes that sweep readers from the mayor’s office to the White House to Coretta Scott King’s bedroom. Compelling and original, Burial for a King captures a defining moment in America’s history. It encapsulates King’s legacy, America’s shifting attitude toward race, and the emergence of Atlanta as a new kind of Southern city....

Title : Burial for a King: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Funeral and the Week that Transformed Atlanta and Rocked the Nation
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781439130544
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Burial for a King: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Funeral and the Week that Transformed Atlanta and Rocked the Nation Reviews

  • Sara
    2019-02-11 18:58

    Rebecca Burns is the best working journalist in Atlanta, and reading her excellent work is always a viseral experience. This is a segment of our history that feels vital to our city's character, and deserves to be examined and investigated. Beyond giving face to the many whose names now serve as downtown streets, the book brings to life the city in crisis - and provides context to see where Dr. King's movement changed Atlanta permanently, and where Atlanta failed its poorest citizens. Burns provides us with heroes to champion, such as Ambassador Andrew Young and Mayor Ivan Allen, as well as indicting the nastiness of those such as Governor Lester Maddox. Excellent companion reading for visitors to the Civil and Human Rights Museum who are looking for a snapshot into that historical period to focus their interest locally.

  • Shawn
    2019-02-18 17:43

    Very interesting book. The details of how Atlantans handled the burial of Dr. King, both good and bad, is a reminder to us all, especially in today’s political climate, to make choices that will put us on the right side of history. Excellent pick by the Roswell Reads committee for the upcoming 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination this April.

  • Nikki
    2019-02-09 18:49

    A former editor of ATLANTA magazine has written a fascinating bit of microhistory about the death and burial of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and how Atlanta handled it (quite well, all things considered.) Both the Black and white Establishments in Atlanta cooperated to support the King family, keep the city from erupting in the riots that marred other cities' mourning, and to honor a native son. Burns has done a lot of research and although I lived through this period (not in Atlanta) I learned a lot of things I hadn't known about what went on.Reading this book brought back a lot of memories, of how jubilation at Lyndon Johnson's announcement that he would not run for President again turned to shock and sorrow just a few days later. Morris Abram, President of Brandeis during some of my time there, is referenced in the book, along with many other familiar names from those times. However, the book is also detailed enough that those who did not live through the 60s could read it without too much confusion. It's a fairly quick read and well worth spending a couple of hours with. Recommended.

  • Marnie
    2019-01-26 14:33

    As I live in Atlanta, I found the history of this brief moment in time facinating. The author included stories about the students, suburbanites, as well as local and national politicians and tied them all together in a fast moving and interesting narative. I was especially taken with the role played by Harry Belafonte and later saw him speak and have now read this autobiography. Thanks to the author for opening this part of world to me.

  • Laurie
    2019-02-05 14:32

    This was a very interesting book that chronicled the week of Martin Luther King Jr.'s death leading up to his burial. It didn't just detail the preparations of the funeral service. The author gives us a picture of the state of the country (in the midst of the Vietnam war), the riots happening in response to MLK's murder, and even the first-person accounts of ordinary citizens who helped in churches and elsewhere.

  • Johnny Clarke
    2019-02-07 14:57

    The book begins with a bang of historical insights that you have to read to get the impact from.

  • courtney
    2019-02-09 11:50

    Good, quick, informative, interesting read. The footnotes were rather unrelated at times.

  • Amy
    2019-01-27 11:33

    Very interesting! This brief history of the events that occurred when King was shot and in the days following was very well researched.

  • Ray Branstiter
    2019-02-03 17:40

    Very interesting book on the little know side stories surrounding the funeral of Dr. King.

  • Kate
    2019-02-15 16:37

    Very affecting, very well-written. A good look at the climate of the times as well as a chronology of the week of MLKJr's assasination and funeral.

  • Bradley
    2019-01-25 10:59

    This was a really great book about how the city of Atlanta came together for the funeral of Dr. King.