Read Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry by Tiffany M. Gill Online

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Looking through the lens of black business history, Beauty Shop Politics shows how black beauticians in the Jim Crow era parlayed their economic independence and access to a public community space into platforms for activism. Tiffany M. Gill argues that the beauty industry played a crucial role in the creation of the modern black female identity and that the seemingly frivLooking through the lens of black business history, Beauty Shop Politics shows how black beauticians in the Jim Crow era parlayed their economic independence and access to a public community space into platforms for activism. Tiffany M. Gill argues that the beauty industry played a crucial role in the creation of the modern black female identity and that the seemingly frivolous space of a beauty salon actually has stimulated social, political, and economic change.From the founding of the National Negro Business League in 1900 and onward, African Americans have embraced the entrepreneurial spirit by starting their own businesses, but black women's forays into the business world were overshadowed by those of black men. With a broad scope that encompasses the role of gossip in salons, ethnic beauty products, and the social meanings of African American hair textures, Gill shows how African American beauty entrepreneurs built and sustained a vibrant culture of activism in beauty salons and schools. Enhanced by lucid portrayals of black beauticians and drawing on archival research and oral histories, Beauty Shop Politics conveys the everyday operations and rich culture of black beauty salons as well as their role in building community....

Title : Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry
Author :
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ISBN : 9780252076961
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 208 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry Reviews

  • Madeline
    2019-03-06 22:31

    Gill offers a well-researched, thorough, and cohesively-presented look at the intersection of beauty culture and political organization in black communities over the last 100 or so years. It's a slightly more ~academic~ book than, for example, Hope in a Jar (which is a special blend of complex + friendly to a general audience), and it adds a lot of nuance to the received view(s) about black Americans' relationship to money, power, and beauty culture. Being a philosopher, I of course, wanted more abstraction around the edges - but really Gill's giving a highly sourced account of a specific slice of history and an elegant explanation of its significance, and I was, after all, reading it for its empirical bona fides since abstraction is my job much more than an historian's. "You mean you wanted her to do your work for you?" No!"Maybe part of your work?"Well, sure, who wants to write? Writing is terrible. (But not that hard.)

  • Ruth Ann
    2019-03-13 20:45

    Immensely interesting! I didn’t know at all that African American beauticians were a really important part of organizing the Civil Rights movement.

  • Shinynickel
    2019-03-11 18:30

    Off this review: Dr. Tiffany Gill earned her Ph.D. from Rutgers University in 2003. Her recently published €œBeauty Shop Politics: African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry (University of Illinois, 2010) explores African American beauticians and beauty salons and their role in twentieth-century social, political, and economic movements and is an analysis of the ways African American beauty entrepreneurs built and sustained a vibrant culture of activism and institution building.