Read Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville: The Dare Mark Campaign by Daniel E. Sutherland Online

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All too often, histories of Civil War battles concentrate on the events of the battle, ignoring the larger campaign and undervaluing the battle’s impact on subsequent events. This work reveals and explains the vital connection between two epic battles: Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. The staggering Confederate victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville are seldoAll too often, histories of Civil War battles concentrate on the events of the battle, ignoring the larger campaign and undervaluing the battle’s impact on subsequent events. This work reveals and explains the vital connection between two epic battles: Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. The staggering Confederate victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville are seldom treated as part of a coherent strategy, and they have never been presented as a single campaign. Yet, analyzed as a whole, the two battles go far to explain Lee’s military success. At the same time, the failures and bungling that characterized Federal efforts are more intelligible when seen in the light of the political and military circumstances that thrust unprepared and inadequate Union commanders into predicaments they little understood. The eastern theater in the winter of 1862 and spring of 1863 witnessed sudden shifts in northern command and strategy and increasing political intervention. Lincoln despaired of McClellan and sought a general more willing to fight; whatever the ultimate result of this search, it provided opportunities the canny Lee was willing and able to exploit....

Title : Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville: The Dare Mark Campaign
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780803242531
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 247 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville: The Dare Mark Campaign Reviews

  • Kristen
    2019-03-21 00:45

    If you want a general history of the 1862-63 campaigns along the Rappahannock line, then this is a perfect book to check out. Sutherland looks at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville not as two separate battles and campaigns, but as one; these battles were fought in a five month time span, in close proximity, with the same goals, and same results. He makes a solid argument about the relationship between these two battles. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that Sutherland's book is less than 200 pages and covers two major battles -- so, it is not a tactical study, but a strategic one. For those who want detail on the tactical/regimental level, check out Frank O'Reilly's The Fredericksburg Campaign, George Rable's Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg!, or Stephen Sears' Chancellorsville. Overall, great book and summary of the Dare Mark Campaign.

  • Vince
    2019-03-25 05:32

    This is a very good general introduction to the Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville battles, which Sutherland, rightly in my view, considers to be the bookends to one long campaign (Dec 1862-May 1863) rather than separate ones. There is virtually no blow by blow individual unit coverage here as the author is concerned only with the major players of Burnside, Hooker and Lee followed by some of the corps and division movements and the officers responsible for those units. Sutherland also ties in the political dimensions of both sides associated with the onset of this campaign. For intricate detail on each battle one needs to see books dedicated to a more microscopic view. However, at 193 pages of text Sutherland packs in a lot of information. His writing is fast and evenly paced and liberally sprinkled with quotes from both officers and enlisted men on both sides of the struggle. There are enough maps to get a sense of the 'lay of the land' for each fight, and although they are only lightly detailed, they suffice to complement the general goal of the book. I had previously read several books on each of the two battles, but still learned something from this work. For anyone just getting their feet wet in exploring this phase of the Civil War, I would recommend this as a good place to begin.