Read Sons of the Rumour by David Foster Online

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David Foster's 13th novel is a dazzling remix of Richard Burton's Arabian Nights. A tale of sexual passion and intrigue told in the form of a mystical journey along the old Silk Roads of Central Asia, the book showcases Foster's uniquely profound command of the Australian vernacular to satirise the conflict between modern secular Western woman and fundamentalist Islamic maDavid Foster's 13th novel is a dazzling remix of Richard Burton's Arabian Nights. A tale of sexual passion and intrigue told in the form of a mystical journey along the old Silk Roads of Central Asia, the book showcases Foster's uniquely profound command of the Australian vernacular to satirise the conflict between modern secular Western woman and fundamentalist Islamic man.Explicit, ambitious and frequently hilarious, Sons of the Rumour is a modern masterpiece by one of Australia's greatest living writers, a man who has been dubbed 'Patrick White's worthy successor'....

Title : Sons of the Rumour
Author :
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ISBN : 9781405039581
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 427 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Sons of the Rumour Reviews

  • Lisa
    2019-04-30 19:06

    It's not often that I rage-quit a book at all, let alone so early in the reading process. Yet I felt I had no other option. I opened the book to be confronted with impenetrable, strangely old-timey prose, pushed on past the prologue (or was it the first chapter?) only to find it continued in the next chapter. Plus, there was a grossly vivid description of a man oogling a woman's breasts. I looked at the length of the book, flicked through it to see if the prose got any better. It didn't. I went, "I'm not reading this" and quit.

  • Adair
    2019-04-23 22:00

    Sons of the Rumour, David FosterDavid Foster’s novel Sons of the Rumour is billed as a “genre-defying work of genius”. I’d go further and say that it also defies description, which makes this review difficult to write. The first few hundred pages tell of the complicated relationship between the Shah and his wife, the shapely Shahrazad, who just won’t shut up. To find some peace, the Shah wanders incognito through the streets of Merv, a city in ancient Persia. Out there, in touch with his subjects, the Shah hears wonderful stories of journeys along the Silk Road, stories that overlap with the Shah’s domestic dramas.All in all, this gorgeously written section makes about as much sense as an inscrutable, byzantine dream. Then, on page 285, we meet Al Morrissy, a retired jazz drummer on a long-haul flight from Sydney to Dublin. Through the stream of Al’s consciousness, we come to understand a little about his equally complicated marriage as well as the mistakes of his past. As happens on long-haul flights, Al drifts into an unsettled sleep and, sure enough, he dreams of Merv.Foster explores the nature of the veil between the two worlds. He also explores the collision between the Muslim male and the Western woman, which becomes the backdrop for all male-female relationships—complex, bewildering, irreconcilable—whether in ancient Persia or modern-day Cronulla. Foster is a writer of exquisite intellect and linguistic daring, and Sons of the Rumour is a brilliant masterwork.Although this novel is heavy-going most of the time, tedious as well as befuddling, the toil is well worth it. Foster is a giant of ideas and satire, of wit and wildly beautiful passages.

  • Jeremy
    2019-05-18 21:13

    David Foster is a marvelous throw-back sort of author while simultaneously being at the very cutting edge of Australian literature. There's enough edge in this novel to shave an Irishman. Bare. Comparing it to Peter Temple's Miles Franklin winning 'Truth' ('Sons of the Rumour' didn't make the shortlist!! - and I hate multiple punc marks...) Is a little like the difference between a well-executed game of high school basketball, and an NBA championship match. It is clever and readable, and packs punch. There's passages of such beauty and irony and insight that your breath can be taken away. I know it's a cliche, but fuck it, it's true. Does hatred frighten you? Love too? If you want to be authentic with your art then you need to not be, no matter what mis... or ...ism the politburo may wish to worry you. This book is a brilliant, talented author at the top of his powers. You should read. Savour. It won't last.

  • Lisa
    2019-05-12 16:59

    Longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award, this postmodern satire is a challenging book but I enjoyed it. Seehttp://anzlitlovers.wordpress.com/201...