Read The Wrong Place by Brecht Evens Michele Hutchison Laura Watkinson Online

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Wanton youth seen through lush, dreamy, and sweeping watercolors.Rendered in vividwatercolorwhere parquet floors and patterned dresses morph together, The Wrong Place revolves around the often absent Robbie, a charismatic lothario of mysterious celebrity who has the run of a city that is as chaotic as it is resplendent. Robbie's sexual energy captivates the attention of meWanton youth seen through lush, dreamy, and sweeping watercolors.Rendered in vividwatercolorwhere parquet floors and patterned dresses morph together, The Wrong Place revolves around the often absent Robbie, a charismatic lothario of mysterious celebrity who has the run of a city that is as chaotic as it is resplendent. Robbie's sexual energy captivates the attention of men and women alike; his literal and figurative brightness is a startling foil to the dreariness of his childhood friend, Francis. With a hand as sensitive as it is exuberant, Brecht Evens's first graphic novel in English captures the strange chemistry of social interaction as easily as he portrays the fragmented nature of identity. The Wrong Place contrasts life as it is, angst-ridden and awkward, with life as it can be: spontaneous, uninhibited, and free....

Title : The Wrong Place
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781770460010
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 184 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Wrong Place Reviews

  • Dov Zeller
    2019-01-15 08:10

    Architectural and emotional, part artifact, part living, breathing thing. Reading it feels like going on a bit of an acid-trippy internal carnivalesque adventure, and at the same time like watching a very experimental/surrealist silent film. There are tensions in here that are hard to describe. A kind of timelessness and, despite its urban contemporary kind of setting and complex architectural feel, a certain quality of a cave-painting. History living, in motion, neither beginning or ending. And then there is a surrealist's puzzle quality to it. It's funny, mysterious, a bit slapstick, a little bawdy, a little bleak and yet vibrantly, unnervingly colorful.Well, not the most articulate review. Check out David's. It's great! https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  • George Marshall
    2018-12-26 11:36

    Outstanding- Brecht has an extraordinary mix of gifts; exquisite and very original art style, a great ear for dialogue and the minutiae of social interactions and, above all, an complex understanding of how comics move through space and time (for example, the way he can use a tiny single speechless panel and a slight shift in body placement indicates the social exclusion of one girl from two others smoking cigarettes together).The art is that of a detached observer- usually small figures in the middle distance, rarely if ever showing facial closeups - we drift through peoples lives, but are not participants in their circle. This detachment allows us to have some distance - we get none of the angry and very personal contempt that you can find in Clowes or Ware. Brecht has compassion and empathy for all sides. So, the story appears to portray Gary as uninspired limited and, literally in the palette 'grey' whilst Robbie is utterly alive, vibrant and original. But Brecht is far more subtle than that- Gary may be insecure and limited but he is clearly a loyal friend and seeks to do something for wider society (he is working in a school). Robbie, on the other hand does nothing, lives off gambling and steals drinks. He uses people and, whilst maintaining contact with Gary only does so on his terms- failing to attend Gary's party and pressurising him to do things that make him embarrassed or uncomfortable. He uses women on a whim, seems to have no interest in what they say and leaves them feeling insecure and inadequate (after sex he just rolls over to go to sleep whilst his one night stand is left asking 'did I say something stupid?').Really this book is about social power and Brecht is showing us how rewards flow to people who have that power. But what we don't see is what happens to steady dull Gary and party animal Robbie 10 or 20 years on when the money runs out and the alcohol has taken its toll.All in all, an outstanding work from a great creator that hugely expands the potential of comics. Brecht shows people and all this with great compassion

  • David Schaafsma
    2019-01-11 07:15

    Read this one especially fast, by Flemish artist Brecht Evens... and Evens is the star here, with his flamboyant watercolors, so explosive, and yet subtle in terms of gesture and social interaction... Robbie is the main character, with all sorts of party scene sexual energy, an attraction for boys and girls... so it is about urban night life, buzzing with energy, yet beneath that there is caring for the characters, a sensitivity for them, he likes them all, sees things from a variety of perspectives... This is a "small" book in that it is not hugely ambitious as Art or Novel. but it is very likable and refreshing and feels new to me, so colorful and alive. My first experience with Evens...

  • Bryce Holt
    2019-01-18 10:36

    Something so beautiful should have more purpose. There's a thousand ways to describe the artwork, but only one way to describe the story, and that is 'pointless.' The pairing of Gary, a cloying and depressing character to watch bumble his way through life, and that of longtime friend Robbie, a Lothario who is bigger than the world he possesses, is not only implausible but so counter to one another that at one point I thought they might be split personalities of a single person. Unfortunately, this is not the case (or...I don't think it is. It's all very confusing). Every page is filled with watercolor that will baffle the mind, but if that's the focus, then stop there. Truly, Brecht Evens shouldn't even have included the story. I think there are a lot of themes at work here, but most seem to silently hint that to live a full life, you must want constant attention and sex. Awkward introversion is comparable to the worst thing imaginable and will lead to no one liking you. No, really...that's what I took from this. All of the watercolored beauty that Evens surely spent hundreds of hours manufacturing is lost to this core concept, and not only is it wrong, but it ruins the power of the art you're watching unfold before your very eyes.The story was foolish, distracting and the sign of a person who is young to the world at large and trying to be someone he is not. I'm sure there are others who feel differently, but I felt cheated by the time I turned the final page. Get this for the art, but pretend there are not words attached to it and I think you will have a powerful experience...if you read it, though, you'll feel you've just lost 2 hours of your life.

  • Aaron
    2019-01-04 10:19

    I recently watched an interview with Dash Shaw in which he brought up Fantagraphics' process of finding authors to publish. In it he mentioned that they often times publish the author who is a great writer, regardless of how behind their art may be. The reason for this is that anyone can get better at art with practice, but bad writers are bad writers; sign the great writer, and soon enough every part of their work will be great.This is the most boring story I've read in years. I'm so tired of graphic novels that treat the medium as something entirely visual, or at least like visuals are so important that they can excuse awful story telling. I didn't make it halfway through this because nothing made me want to know anything more about any of these uninspired characters. The art is kind of cool, yeah. There are some striking images, specifically some on the train. But behind the sprawling lights and multi-colored humans is an overwrought, relentlessly boring story of white 20-somethings going to parties and the resulting "examinations" of anxiety and being a social outcast and whatever other problems they can blow out of proportion to make them feel separate from the privileged sphere of society they occupy.

  • Penelope
    2019-01-11 10:35

    If you approach this book as a traditional plot-driven story, you'll probably be disappointed. The "plot" isn't really...anything; it's there, and you can follow it easily enough, but it doesn't matter very much. It's all about the characters, the situations, and the interactions. As a sort of fictional "case study" of social interaction, this book is really amazing and sometimes painfully awkward (because it's just so true). Poor Gary...I could totally relate to him, and it made me sad.Aside from managing to capture a sort of "truth" about human social interaction, Evens also creates a whimsical world of over-the-top characters who seem to inhabit a realm totally separate from "reality" (in a too-good-to-be-true-but-would-you-really-want-to-live-there-forever kind of way).But the best part of this book are the illustrations. I wish I could have posters of every single page and plaster them on the walls of my apartment. So beautiful and inspiring...worth it for the excellent illustration & design alone.

  • Emma
    2019-01-14 05:28

    This is an exquisite book. Formally, its so sophisticated; his use of colour and the compositional space of the page is unique. Each page is more like a painting than a comic, he doesn't use boxes and speech bubbles and takes advantage of the freedom this gives his art to deliver the story in fresh ways. Illustratively it's also wonderful; his gracefully dabbed figures have a very authentic, deceptively simple body language. He gives the characters all the right gestures and density and colour. People criticise the story as banal but I think it's brilliantly observed, I was both convinced and even gripped by the social dynamics his story tells. The dialogue is subtle and precisely noted. He has an ear for language as well as an eye for, well, the visible. I also love his use of watercolour, he perfectly exploits its capacity for both opacity and translucence. He paints physical spaces beautifully too.

  • Ty Melgren
    2019-01-20 11:25

    Really great watercolor comix. Boring parties, cool parties, faces, sex, feeeeeelings, and elaborately tiled floors are all fun to look at in this book and they seem realler in here than they often seem in other comix or books or movies. There's a dude in here who everyone wants to be and hang out with and dress like, and while I was reading this I wanted to be and hang out with and dress like him too.http://tymelgren.com/books/april2013....

  • Althea J.
    2019-01-11 11:17

    A quick read with fun and vibrant watercolor. I feel like I've been to that exact awkward dinner party, and that I know those party people, and that group of friends that revolved around a cult of personality, and I had that whirlwind club romance that lasts a night. Aaah, some fun nostalgia for me, and rendered with brilliantly stylish art.Perfect as a library book.

  • MariNaomi
    2019-01-04 06:31

    Stunning artwork, great pacing, and a thoughtful message. I am so blown away by the gorgeous watercolors that I don't want to stop looking at them. I hope to see more of his books reach the U.S. Four and a half stars.

  • Stephanie (aka WW)
    2019-01-12 10:12

    This is perhaps the most strangely colored graphic novel I’ve ever read. Illustrated all in watercolor, I didn't really “get” it at first...there are incomplete and overlapping figures, hints of decor, incomplete scenes...it all looks so sloppily done. But I soon found the style interesting and the story took over. I had to know just who this enigmatic Robbie was. There's not much in the way of story, just a slice of life related to Robbie and those who obsess over him, including unpopular Gary who throws a party hoping his 'good friend' shows up (he doesn't) and a seemingly unpopular girl who gets "chosen" by Robbie as his woman of the night. It’s all good fun, though, and a good independent comic.

  • Marcia
    2019-01-15 06:19

    Ergens waar je niet wil zijn vertelt het verhaal van alledaagse beslommeringen in kleurrijke aquarelprenten. Het verhaal begint met Bert, nogal een grijze muis, die een feestje houdt in zijn appartement. Gesprek van de avond is echter de populaire Robbie die niet aanwezig is. Wat volgt is een melancholische bespiegeling van het leven vol herkenbare dialogen. Naar de kapper gaan, dansen, drinken, one night stands, solliciteren naar een nieuwe job, platgedrukt worden in de metro: je vindt het allemaal in deze prachtige graphic novel van Brecht Evens.Mijn complete recensie lees je op Boekvinder.be.

  • Cynara
    2019-01-04 07:10

    In vivid, vibrant rainbow of water colour Evens charts the anxiety, spontaneity, palpable awkwardness, heartbreak, ugliness, beauty and moments of chaos that characterize human social interactions and connections. The text and dialogue is loose and spare, allowing images/colours carry much of the book's weight. The basic story revolves around the luminous character of Robbie, a charming bon vivant whose name is always on everyone's lips, and who draws everyone into his orbit whenever he enters a room. He is contrasted with the dull (the character is, in fact, grey in colour) and repressed character of his childhood friend Gary, who, even among his friends is overlooked. Gary is sympathetic and relatable (when attempting to host a party, rehearses his script in the bathroom and struggles to hold his guests attention). But rather than deeply develop the characters, Evens suggests the night clubs and parties as characters themselves.I particularly loved the kinetic collapsing of Evens illustration style in Robbie's lovemaking scenes, as well as the lush, visually dense double-page spreads of packed subway cars, overcrowded night clubs, and a multi-level staircase teeming with house-party guests. Evens style deftly captures our desire to be special/individuals (to matter, to stand out) at the same time that he communicates the feeling of isolation in a crowd and the fear of being socially eclipsed. The artistic decisions are smart, innovative and visually poetic--like having the characters' dialogue colour match their clothing, so you can keep track of who is speaking at the same time that there is a sense of people talking over each other, conversation literally hanging (free of the structure of speech bubbles) in the air. Evens is one to watch, The Wrong Place is stunning.

  • Jennifer
    2019-01-06 07:17

    I have been itching to read this book for years now. I was thrilled to find a copy of it at the Vancouver Public Library and spent a pleasant hour furiously consuming it. While the art was positively wonderful--the layers of watercolor silhouettes that make up people are pretty magnificent--I wasn't as much captured by the narrative of loneliness and dichotomies between the extroverts and introverts. Maybe Evens is commenting on that dichotomy within everyone. Hm. In any case, it was a gorgeous book and I will be looking for more of his work

  • Chris Drew
    2018-12-31 11:34

    The art is fantastic and vibrant, the world and its characters are just non-sequitur and unpredictable enough. Makes you excited for the possibilities of graphic story telling. Comparable to Dash Shaw if you are familiar with his work or looking for something in the same vein.

  • Shannon
    2018-12-30 09:31

    One of the most exciting pieces of comic art I've come across in a while. The story is a little too indie/20-something/angsty for me, but the watercolor art is mind-blowing, both from just a craft aspect and from an artistic vision one as well. This is what Asterios Polyp thought it was.

  • Derek Royal
    2019-01-24 11:16

    An early book of Evens's that I've been meaning to read for some time. I finally did so due to our recent review of his new book, Panther, on The Comics Alternative: http://comicsalternative.com/episode-....

  • Dave-O
    2019-01-03 08:12

    A melancholy-clever-sexy visual feast that makes me want to draw draw draw.

  • Mark Victor Young
    2019-01-14 03:12

    A work beautifully rendered in watercolour, The Wrong Place is about social gatherings, party settings, and party people, I guess. A series of events where the mysterious Robbie's attendance is either the centre of attention or his arrival the main topic of conversation. I've never seen watercolours done in this way before, with so much detail but also with the slight imprecision of the medium. The dance floor scenes were something else. The lines aren't inked, so it seems to have been "drawn" in paint. So brilliant - but I've already waxed enthusiastic over Evens's art in my review of Panther. Panther is the better story, I thought, but the art is amazing in both.

  • Mateen Mahboubi
    2019-01-09 03:12

    Everybody has a Robbie in their life. Loved the art. Some real great watercolour work.

  • Loona
    2019-01-17 10:17

    It was funny and relatable, which made it a quick, fun read... also I'm a sucker for watercolors

  • Nicole
    2018-12-26 04:12

    So good it hurt me to read.

  • Renée
    2019-01-01 07:22

    Well...I love Brecht Evens´ style, the effort he puts into his drawings, the colors, the patterns, the story telling, the way he knows how to show social relationships and group dynamics with pictures and I LOVE the ´surprise´ pages that suddenly zoom in or out the pictures before or give a completely different perspective. So basically it has all necessary ingredients for a great story. It is just that I am quite disinterested in parties, nightlife and nonsense talk, as often busied during those parties. And this book was full of it. Lots of indirect communication and very real life, but in real life I would definetely be ´in the wrong place´ if I´d be in any situation as described in the book. I would have liked the characters to pick up a real conversation, to dive into this whole social disequality thing and do some serious metatalk about it maybe. I don´t know. I just don´t care so much about the whole thing, because the real issues are only indirectly addressed but nothing extra is ´done with it´. I remember the first graphic novels of Barbara Stok, they were also full of parties and I got bored, but when she got somewhat older, the topics changed and her books gained in depth story wise. (allthough I do feel she is now touching on subjects that need more depth from her such as death and she is experimenting with totally different kind of books). Well anyway, I am sort of hoping the same thing will happpen with Brecht Evens. Grow up quickly and then make another one. I´d probably 5 star it.

  • Zac
    2019-01-21 11:18

    I picked up this book solely for the art, which is done in an often very colourful watercolour. The figures are not particularly well defined if you look at them close up but but Evens still manages to capture a lot of expression in their poses. The design is pretty interesting with few panel borders and no speech bubbles but it's made up entirely of conversations: Evens employs different coloured text to help you understand who is talking at any one time, and though I don't often pay attention to lettering, it is particularly well done here.Anyway, imagine my surprise when I discover the story is actually pretty great too! This probably gave me the most laugh-out-loud moments reading a comic since Ghost World a couple of years ago. The story follows a few main characters and their relationship to much loved party-animal (and actually a pretty nice guy) Robbie. Evens leaves you wanting to know more out of the characters, but gives you enough to be able to draw your own conclusions and get some satisfaction.At times, this reminded me of a children's picture book. There are some surreal moments, and Robbie's friends' stories about him border on the fantastical. When we do meet Robbie, he actually is a bit of a magical character. That said, there's some pretty abstract but still graphic sex scenes and swearing that turns this into more of a picture book for grown-ups.It's a quick read as there are a few pages without any text at all, but one that would be worth a reread now and again.

  • Miguel Jiménez
    2019-01-08 09:25

    Probablemente, el cómic más vanguardista que he leído. Al leerlo parece como si estuvieras viendo y leyendo una pintura en acción, con movimientos y diálogos expuestos de una forma muy especial. Así, cada página es un nuevo descubrimiento para el lector que va quedando entre admirado y sorprendido. Pero esto no sólo se queda en el arte: también hay historia. Qué manera tan ligera y agradable—no por ello aburrida, tiene una fuerza importante— de abordar la frivolidad, el ser superficial, la hipocresía de las relaciones humanas, etc. Y todo esto con un humor suave, tranquilo, que te deja pensando en ese momento.¿Cuántas personas no hay como Robbie: "exitosas" y que están puestas más arriba de la nube? Muchas. ¿Y cuántas como Gert? ¡Já, a pocos les interesa poner atención en ellos! Gert, un personaje único: el ser inadaptado que no sabe que es inadaptado, y que pese a que a la gente le da lo mismo lo que pase con su vida, ya sea porque no se dé cuenta o por lo que sea, él ¡es feliz! ¡Sonríe y sigue su vida! Algo interesante es que al chocar estos dos personajes tan opuestos hay una buena relación entre ellos, pueden convivir de manera muy agradable, gracias, precisamente, a que los dos ponen de su parte.Por último, el final no termine por entenderlo. Yo esperaba mucho más de esta historia y el desenlace fue tan pronto y repentino. Sin duda te deja extrañado. Y baja la valoración de la obra. Una lástima, pues creo que se podía decir mucho más.

  • Chris
    2019-01-23 11:22

    This is an interesting book. Unusual and amazing art that sets a tone and communicates meaning at the same time. An uncomfortably accurate and poignant portrayal of real people and real lives. And a plot that isn't much of a story. It seems the book exists to capture and compare characters more than share particular events. It does that quite effectively and evocatively, but I ultimately wasn't sure what it was saying or what I should take away from it.The book goes through three acts. The first is set at a party in Gary's apartment, and we get a painfully tangible sense of his social awkwardness as he tries to host and mingle. Everyone ends up leaving in a disappointed rush when they learn that Gary's friend Robbie won't be joining them. The second act follows life-of-the-party Robbie during a night out on the town of dancing, drinking, and sex. He lives life to the fullest and everyone is magnetically drawn to his charismatic zest and good spirits. The third act is another night on the town, with Gary and Robbie hanging out together. We see the strength of their friendship and a supreme example of their differences.Through it all, we see positive and negative aspects to both young men, particularly as we see their impact on others. But I can't say I felt there was an endorsement for either or a preference for one over the other, which left me puzzled.

  • Brian
    2019-01-18 08:36

    This is an interesting book. Unusual and amazing art that sets a tone and communicates meaning at the same time. An uncomfortably accurate and poignant portrayal of real people and real lives. And a plot that isn't much of a story. It seems the book exists to capture and compare characters more than share particular events. It does that quite effectively and evocatively, but I ultimately wasn't sure what it was saying or what I should take away from it. --- The book goes through three acts. The first is set at a party in Gary's apartment, and we get a painfully tangible sense of his social awkwardness as he tries to host and mingle. Everyone ends up leaving in a disappointed rush when they learn that Gary's friend Robbie won't be joining them. The second act follows life-of-the-party Robbie during a night out on the town of dancing, drinking, and sex. He lives life to the fullest and everyone is magnetically drawn to his charismatic zest and good spirits. The third act is another night on the town, with Gary and Robbie hanging out together. We see the strength of their friendship and a supreme example of their differences. --- Through it all, we see positive and negative aspects to both young men, particularly as we see their impact on others. But I can't say I felt there was an endorsement for either or a preference for one over the other, which left me puzzled.

  • Kevin
    2019-01-02 04:17

    This book is beautifully drawn in vibrant watercolour/gouache and the author uses some really clever visual storytelling techniques such as colour-coded dialogue that can flow independently of its speakers, without the need for speech balloons. The whole book feels lively and free in its use of text and image, often looking like a collection of paintings/illustrations that stand on their own, while still telling a fairly conventional cartoon strip narrative.The story is a contrast in characters, a meeting of minds: conversation-killer Gert and his free-spirited childhood friend, Robbie. I didn't quite understand the appeal or popularity of the Robbie character, but then again my grasp of French isn't up to subtleties. At one point, on the night ride home, Robbie pisses on a wall and everyone applauds the creative genius of his "piss angel", so I'm guessing we're not really supposed to believe the hype.I'm looking forward to seeing future books with more complex characters and stories from this artist, but his stylish drawings, design sense and ability to create subtle shifts in mood through visuals already make Les Noceurs something special.

  • Kinsey_m
    2018-12-30 10:11

    I prefer the story in "The making of", but really, Brecht Evens is more about the stunning watercolors than about the stories. I am currently using one of his great pictures as desktop on my work computer in an attempt to inject some life and colour into my grey office (literally grey, apparently they couldn't find a more depressing colour to paint the walls).Update: I've just re-read this graphic novel and liked the sotry better the second time around. Maybe it is not that Evens stories are very inferior to his art, but that they are so understated that it takes the right mood or multiple readings to get past the drawings and start caring about the characters. This time, I started thinking about Robbie and his friends admairers, and if Robbie's life is really so great as the others seem to think. Maybe he is happy in his shallowness, but does he really deserve the admiration he receives? Provably not.And yet he doesn't seem like a bad guy. I've met people like him (probably Evens has too) and as years go by people get bored of them.

  • Mia
    2019-01-15 11:35

    The Wrong Place is a graphic novel unlike any other that I have read before. The format and presentation of dialogue is truly original, using colour to retain the sources of conversation, and banishing any sort of panel from the page which might cramp the atmosphere that is so wonderfully communicated. This clever layout design manages to portray multiple conversations at once in a non-linear fashion, catapulting illustrations along with humour and drama directly into the readers eyes. Certain parts are hilarious, others are just engrossing; the free-flowing illustrative style morphs into truthful representations of friends gathering, nostalgia, comedy, lovemaking or magic that might appear in the late hours of the day. The excellent portrayal of atmosphere and emotion make this book really stand out, and Brecht Evens delivers a brilliant experience that isnt so much a contained story, but a vivid snapshot of life. A world continues outside of these pages, and it is our world.