Read X-Men: Eve of Destruction by Scott Lobdell Tom Raney Leinil Francis Yu Salvador Larroca Online

x-men-eve-of-destruction

Magneto menaces the world once again - but while he threatens to spread war, the X-Men are trapped in Genosha! It's up to Phoenix to lead a new team to victory, but can she manage it? Can they? Guest-starring Dazzler, Northstar, Corsair of the Starjammers and more! Collects Uncanny X-Men No. 391-393 and X-Men No. 111-113....

Title : X-Men: Eve of Destruction
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780785115526
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 152 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

X-Men: Eve of Destruction Reviews

  • Stephen
    2019-02-03 17:13

    With a political power base under his control, the cure for the Legacy Virus released worldwide, and his powers restored to their full potential, Magneto is finally ready to launch an all-out assault upon humanity. Abducting Professor Xavier from the X-Mansion, he gathers an army and at last declares war. But with nearly all the team absent, and Cyclops and Wolverine on a rescue mission, Phoenix must recruit a new team of X-Men to help defeat Magneto once and for all.So. Eve of Destruction. This story, the last before Grant Morrison took over, serves as a finalé of sorts to the 90's-early 2000's era X-Men storylines. It's built up to be just as epic as it deserves to be. However, it falls a little flat. Seriously, the story proper is about five issues long, and one of those is just an entire issue of build-up. Basically, it's not what you'd call an epic.It's not a bad story at all, though. The focus on Cyclops is nice after his return to the team, and though we don't really get to see him and Jean interact, there's some indication that things are going to be different between them. It's great to see Cyclops and Wolverine move on from their previous animosity and work together as equals rather than leader and subordinate, and their scenes together are the best of the arc.I've got mixed feelings on the second issue. It's a decent read but doesn't particularly move the plot forward. In a weird way, it felt like it was trying too hard to answer questions I didn't think were important until they were asked. Captain America's brief cameo to explain why the Avengers aren't involving themselves just raised more questions than it answered (like seriously, Magneto is a friggin' super-villain, what is the issue here? And when has a terrorist being a head of state ever stopped the US from interfering?) and similar appearances from Sabra and Beast don't help matters. It's the classic 'Superman stays out of Gotham' conundrum: while involving the Avengers raises the stakes, I'd have been perfectly happy to just apply the mentality that Magneto is the X-Men's villain so therefore only they can deal with him and have done with it.The new mutants are all pretty cool, particularly Wraith, and they all get a decent amount of spotlight. It's fun seeing Northstar and Frenzy again, too.This was my first introduction to Dazzler, and it wasn't a good one - she was such a whiner! - but I always appreciate the continuity of older characters returning.The final fight is entertaining in a mindless kind of way. After seeing Magneto previously recruit the Neo, their absence here is... surprising, but whatever. The 'little league' team all get a chance to showcase their powers as they attack Magneto one at a time (apparently it's not just evil anonymous henchmen that do that) and Magneto feels even more overpowered than usual (seriously, iron particles in the blood? What's next, Magneto attacking the X-Men with spinach leaves?) but the twist at the end of the battle is a decent surprise, and when (view spoiler)[ Professor X once again refuses to kill Magneto, Wolverine gutting him is especially satisfying(hide spoiler)].And then the new team all immediately leave, and (view spoiler)[ oh, wait, Magneto didn't actually die(hide spoiler)]. What a cop-out of an ending. But as a farewell to one of the best periods of X-Men history, it could have been much worse. Anyone who fails to be touched by the final panel with Xavier, Wolverine, Cyclops and Phoenix ("I guess that leaves the four of us?") is made of sterner stuff than me.

  • Alan
    2019-02-07 18:01

    It’s always an interesting experience going back to a piece of some kind of entertainment (comic, book, cartoon, movie, etc.) you loved as a child/teenager, but which just doesn’t hold up to your adult self. Case in point, ‘X-Men: Eve of Destruction’, an X-Men “event” from the early 2000s which essentially closed up the ‘90s era X-Men (well, it was published slightly after the ‘90s had ended, but never mind that) and paved the way for the new generation ushered in by Grant Morrison and Joe Casey. After months of anticipation, my teenage-self found this pretty gripping reading and was blown away by the ending. Over a decade later, however, my adult self isn’t quite so impressed…‘Eve of Destruction’ isn’t only historically significant for dropping the final curtain on an era of the X-Men that many of us grew up reading. It’s also significant, story-wise, for finally giving us the inevitable “war” between humans and mutants which had been alluded to almost since the franchise began. Or rather, the war, perused by Magneto (now the legally recognised ruler of Genosha), is on the brink of beginning, and the X-Men are the only people who can stop it from actually happening.However, recent events (not explained in here) have caused most of the X-Men to form a splinter team (who went on to star in the embarrassingly titled ‘X-Treme X-Men’ series) who are nowhere to be found. While Cyclops, Wolverine and Polaris are in Genosha trying to help the human refugees, victims of Magneto’s warpath, it’s up to Phoenix to recruit brand new X-Men to help the cause. We’re then quickly introduced to a distinctly dislikeable new cast of characters, in homage to ‘Giant Sized X-Men’ #1, who unquestioningly follow Jean and become new X-Men, only to disappear never to be used again at the end. These new X-Men are expected to help Cyclops and Wolverine defeat Magneto without any training, and they don’t really do anything anyway. In fact, the whole final battle with Magneto (and, at the time, this was hyped up to really be the “final” battle) is a bit of a joke, as the new team members don’t actually do anything after all that lead in, and Cyclops & Wolverine just bumble around a bit waiting for things to conveniently fall conveniently into place. The ending just doesn’t make any sense (without wanting to spoil too much, are we supposed to believe that that could happen, with absolutely no repercussions, while Magneto’s soldiers and thousands of followers were there standing there watching?), and it was reversed two issues later anyway.Preceding the main story, ‘Eve of Destruction’ features two separate episodes. Firstly, we have a short prelude, taken from the ending of an earlier X-Men comic, which won’t make much sense to anyone who hasn’t read that. Then we have a self-contained story where Cyclops is reunited with his father after being presumed dead, but in reality having merged with Apocalypse. Cyclops’ new carefree risk-taking attitude is a big theme in this whole book and is worth noting. This is because in superhero comics, where changes to the status-quo are usually always reversed, the changes in Cyclops’ personality have actually remained intact, explored further by Grant Morrison, and have had dramatic ramifications in future stories which are still felt today. From a historical perspective, this is pretty significant. Mildly significant, too, is the fact that this story leads in somewhat into Grant Morrison’s ground-breaking run, explaining why at the start of that run Magneto is on a wheelchair and unable to prevent the Sentinel attack.For the sake of my teenage self, I wanted to like ‘Eve of Destruction’ and to give it a positive review, but I just can’t. The story feels rushed, things happen too conveniently, and it’s ultimately underwhelming. It isn’t terrible, and there’s some slight historical significance in this story for X-Men continuity, but it’s ultimately passable and just not very good.

  • Trieu
    2019-02-16 22:19

    I used this as a jumping on point for reading the main X-Men titles in the 2000s. I'm a fairly new comic reader but I've always been a fan of the X-Men cartoons and movies; naturally I wanted to transition that love into comics. I've tried Ultimate X-Men which was good but after the series ended with 100th issue, I felt kind of lost on where to go to next. I moved on to Marvel NOW X-Men titles which I've thoroughly enjoyed, but, ironically considering the "NOW" part, are terrible jumping on points.I think I've found what I was looking for with this book. Of the X-Men, I don't recognize much of anyone else besides Wolverine, Cyclops, and Jean. I enjoyed being introduced to the interim X-Team (though I wish I knew where the hell everyone else is). Genosha has always been sort of a mystery to me but one of the earlier issue in this TPB did a really good job explaining it through a news broadcaster. All in all, a fun concise read. Not so awesome factor: everyone introduced ends up leaving...

  • Jdetrick
    2019-02-07 22:19

    Not bad, as these crossovers go, but I'm more excited about the new direction coming after this storyarc.

  • Andrew
    2019-02-05 16:00

    Good gravy, is this bad. They definitely needed Morrison to come in and shake things up. (His run starts immediately after this series.) The second issue of Eve of Destruction proper (there's some prelude material) has a special place in my heart, because it was a comic picked up on a whim back in the day just cause I felt like it. At the time, the art (Leinil Yu in this case) was the coolest comic art I'd ever seen, and the issue seemed like good prep work for something big.I think I picked up the first issue a short while later with the aspirations of maybe collecting the series only to realize how terrible the beginning of the series was. Now Giant Size X-Men #1's recruiting scenes have been copied many times, but never so poorly as they were here. And with characters you'd rather were left out. Then the ending to the series feels so rushed and forced. I think Lobdell aspired too high for the time constraints he was placed in. What's more, Morrison would ignore the end of this series altogether. He may be a talented writer but he could care less about smashing continuity.Art is Salvador Larroca, before he ships off to do Xtreme, and Leinil Yu. I love Yu's art at points in this book.Overall, this book culminates the 90's X-Men, even though it came out in 2001. By the time it came, the farewell was long overdue.

  • Erik
    2019-02-06 20:21

    Decent X-Men story, especially for Lobdell. Doesn’t really wrap up much of what he’d been doing during the end of the 90s, but does provide a nice ending to his run. Most of what happens is immediately ignored by Morrison and Casey when they took over the two flagship series. I’d probably give this a point higher if the new characters had any personality at all. Art is decent and typical of the era.

  • Adam Fisher
    2019-02-20 19:06

    In the aftermath of the storyline "The Twelve" and Cyclops' un-merging with Apocalypse, comes "Age of Destruction". This storyline is ok, and mearly sets up the arrival of Grant Morrison as writer and the events of "E is For Extinction", which is an amazing tale. Most of the events take place in Genosha and deal with Magneto's beginning dictatorship. Overall, just middle of the road here.

  • Evan
    2019-01-28 14:53

    The only reason I picked up this TPB was to see what storyline led into Grant Morrison's solid swerve of a run. Frankly, I could have done without it, because Morrison un-does a lot of what is established here, and in record time for a retcon.

  • Peter
    2019-01-27 16:54

    Repetitive dialogue, lumpy confusing artwork, and no weight behind the storyline. For the cataclysmic level of what is happening in the story, there is no tension whatsoever.

  • Michael
    2019-02-10 18:03

    Not an original narrative, but still a successful storyline.

  • Timo
    2019-01-23 18:13

    Magneto, bad again. Magneto, maybe dead this time.Some nice art, but still, way too much talking.