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In Experiencing Fiction, James Phelan develops a provocative and engaging affirmative answer to the question, “Can we experience narrative fiction in similar ways?” Phelan grounds that answer in two elements of narrative located at the intersection between authorial design and reader response: judgments and progressions. Phelan contends that focusing on the three main kindIn Experiencing Fiction, James Phelan develops a provocative and engaging affirmative answer to the question, “Can we experience narrative fiction in similar ways?” Phelan grounds that answer in two elements of narrative located at the intersection between authorial design and reader response: judgments and progressions. Phelan contends that focusing on the three main kinds of judgment—interpretive, ethical, and aesthetic—and on the principles underlying a narrative’s movement from beginning to end reveals the experience of reading fiction to be potentially sharable. In Part One, Phelan skillfully analyzes progressions and judgments in narratives with a high degree of narrativity: Jane Austen’s Persuasion, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Edith Wharton’s “Roman Fever,” and Ian McEwan’s Atonement. In Part Two, Phelan turns his attention to the different relationships between judgments and progressions in hybrid forms—in the lyric narratives of Ernest Hemingway’s “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,” Sandra Cisneros’s “Woman Hollering Creek,” and Robert Frost’s “Home Burial,” and in the portrait narratives of Alice Munro’s “Prue” and Ann Beattie’s “Janus.” More generally, Phelan moves back and forth between the exploration of theoretical principles and the detailed work of interpretation. As a result, Experiencing Fiction combines Phelan’s fresh and compelling readings of numerous innovative narratives with his fullest articulation of the rhetorical theory of narrative. ...

Title : Experiencing Fiction: Judgments, Progressions, and the Rhetorical Theory of Narrative
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ISBN : 9780814251621
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 249 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Experiencing Fiction: Judgments, Progressions, and the Rhetorical Theory of Narrative Reviews

  • Hilary
    2019-01-27 20:12

    Again, a total game changer. By the same adored professor. He's brilliant and accessible and does what I plan to do (not exactly, and certainly not as well, but still) so clearly I have to read his stuff. I gross my best friend out by calling him "Daddy Phelan" and sometimes singing "Papa, can you heeeeaaaaaaar me?" when referring to his work. Because clearly I'm insane. This book is going to feature prominently in my dissertation and future work, and also changed the way I talk about literature. It hasn't changed the way I read, per se, because what he manages to do (like much of the rhetorical critics I've been reading) is give words to ideas I already had. However, his chapter (and subsequent work) on Toni Morrison's Beloved makes me itch to get back to my 11th graders and reteach it. Any teacher friends want a sub? That said, any teacher friends interested in reading his chapter on Beloved, let me know and I'll scan it and email as a pdf. (His other chapters are great, too, natch, but don't deal with anything I taught prior.)This book deals with larger issues than just character narration, so it is a) more technically dense, but also b) more useful across the literary board.