Read The Ice Cave: A Woman’s Adventures from the Mojave to the Antarctic by Lucy Jane Bledsoe Online

the-ice-cave-a-woman-s-adventures-from-the-mojave-to-the-antarctic

For Lucy Jane Bledsoe, wilderness had always been a source of peace. But during one disastrous solo trip in the wintry High Sierra she came face to face with a crisis: the wilderness no longer felt like home. The Ice Cave recounts Bledsoe’s wilderness journeys as she recovers her connection with the wild and discovers the meanings of fear and grace. These are Bledsoe’s griFor Lucy Jane Bledsoe, wilderness had always been a source of peace. But during one disastrous solo trip in the wintry High Sierra she came face to face with a crisis: the wilderness no longer felt like home. The Ice Cave recounts Bledsoe’s wilderness journeys as she recovers her connection with the wild and discovers the meanings of fear and grace. These are Bledsoe’s gripping tales of fending off wolves in Alaska, encountering UFOs in the Colorado Desert, and searching for mountain lions in Berkeley. Her memorable story “The Breath of Seals” takes readers to Antarctica, the wildest continent on earth, where she camped out with geologists, biologists, and astrophysicists. These fresh and deeply personal narratives remind us what it means to be simply one member of one species, trying to find food and shelter—and moments of grace—on our planet....

Title : The Ice Cave: A Woman’s Adventures from the Mojave to the Antarctic
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780299218447
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 182 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Ice Cave: A Woman’s Adventures from the Mojave to the Antarctic Reviews

  • Keith
    2019-02-10 17:19

    An entertaining book about a woman who seeks adventure all over the world in order to satisfy a yearning inside her that just isn't satisfied by modern society. Lucy enjoys the thrill of exploring and being alone in remote locations. Though she does some of her adventuring with other people along for the ride, it is clear that she is a lone wolf and prefers her only company to be the flora and fauna around her. The book is broken into a chapter per adventure and some are more compelling than others. I particularly enjoyed the one where she attempted to spot a mountain lion and the one where she went to Antarctica. Her Antarctica trip in particular was fascinating since she was exploring territory that very few of us will ever see or experience. The stories that focused more on her fear and inner demons were less interesting to me and I found myself getting pulled into her gloomy attitude rather than be pumped up by the thrills in her other adventures.

  • Denise
    2019-01-24 15:08

    I typically read nonfiction and was looking to this one. While I knew this was several experiences from the author, I was disappointed with the brevity of them. The stories are simple and well written, but seem to lack the 'meat' of most nonfictions. I feel that several stories seem to minimize the dangers to extreme situations: a grizzly encounter, a wolf scratching at a tent etc..Though this should not have surprised me, as early on the author self describes herself as being what I would consider a rush junkie (someone enjoying living on the edge), and almost needing to push the envelope in these situations with nature to feel alive. "My wilderness trips began, occasionally, to fail me...Somehow it was no longer enough to prove to myself that I had all the skills I needed to survive, anywhere and anytime.". I guess I prefer an author with a bit more humbleness.

  • Tammy
    2019-02-09 12:03

    In this book, Lucy Jane Bledsoe captures the mysterious subliminity of wilderness -- where-ever it may be found. As with all good bards, her words capture the essence of experiences I have shared in part, but lack the words to articulate."Perhaps climbing a mountain is nothing more than an act of worship, and reaching the barren perch of a summit is to experience pure awe."From the fear of solo adventures gone wrong, to the strange allure of deserts, to the unity of boat and water in a sea kayak, to the mystery of lions, bears, and wolves, Bledsoe wanders through the allure of the wilderness that calls so many kindred souls. Those who have heard that siren call will likely appreciate this read.

  • Erika
    2019-02-15 18:15

    I thought it was going to be an adventure survival tale, but it was more like an introspective travelogue to beautiful and extreme places. Even though the author got into dangerous scrapes, the book never had me on the edge of my seat. A pleasant read.

  • Monica
    2019-01-25 14:21

    While I'd read several of these essays in anthologies before, I was glad to read them again. Also, while I'd never really been interested in Antarctica before (it's cold, and inhospitable--'Nuff said), I really enjoyed Blesoe's essay about the continent and her time there.

  • Sandra Lambert
    2019-02-06 16:17

    Nature essays at their best combine adventure and philosophy. These essays are at their best. I've written more about The Ice Cave on my website www.sandralambert.com