Read Youdunit Whodunit! How to Write Mysteries by Nicola Furlong Online

youdunit-whodunit-how-to-write-mysteries

Improve your writing today with YOUDUNIT WHODUNIT!, a short and practical how-to guide to crafting mysteries. Written by multi-published mystery author, Nicola Furlong, this e-book offers simple tricks and techniques, supported by concrete examples, which you can apply immediately to novels, short stories, screenplays, radio dramas or television scripts. Further details beImprove your writing today with YOUDUNIT WHODUNIT!, a short and practical how-to guide to crafting mysteries. Written by multi-published mystery author, Nicola Furlong, this e-book offers simple tricks and techniques, supported by concrete examples, which you can apply immediately to novels, short stories, screenplays, radio dramas or television scripts. Further details below.“Nicola Furlong has written a fun, engaging 'how to' book about writing mysteries. She is witty, thorough and she certainly knows what she's talking about.” (Maureen Jennings – author of the DETECTIVE MURDOCH series.)“… a snappy guide that effectively covers the bases for the beginning mystery writer. You'll pick up useful insights into plot, character, point of view, suspense and so much more. The many tips should also help you find your unique style. If anything will kick start your first foray into crime writing, this great little resource will. I sure wish it had been around when I waded blindly into writing.”(Mary Jane Maffini - author of the Camilla MacPhee, Fiona Silk and Charlotte Adams mysteries)YOUDUNIT WHODUNIT! HOW TO WRITE MYSTERIES covers specific writing essentials, including: STRUCTURE:• Key Elements of a Three-Act Tragedy• Beginnings with a Bang• Into the Belly of the Middle Ground• Nailing Endings CHARACTER:• Picking Points of View• Concocting Major, Secondary and Minor Characters• Dialogue Ditties STORY: • To Plot or Not to Plot• @#% Ideas• Twists and Turns• Gotta Have Pace• Kicking up Suspense• Clues and Red Herrings• Flashbacks and Transitions• Types and Styles of MysteriesEXCERPTS:STRUCTURE: Chapter 2: Hit ‘Em Early, Hit ‘Em HardHook and shock your audience by rocketing straight to the main crime or another crime so something important is happening, has just happened or will just happen. Set up the central plot problem (e.g., kidnapping or murder) or a major plot problem (like a stolen artefact or a missing person). This forces your villain forward; there's no turning back. CLUES: Chapter 18: Is That A Clue Or Are You Just Happy To See Me? Clues are the traces of guilt left behind by culprit. A good clue will eventually point in the right direction but initially seems to point in the wrong direction, or it means something different than expected, or it points nowhere. Earl Stanley Gardner described clues as sequences; in other words, he suggested that a clue is a succession or series of related events. The succession of related events may occur close together or many pages or chapters apart. For example, we know that a cold beer creates beads of moisture on its glass container. Now, if our suspect states that he finished his lager a couple of hours ago and our dazzling detective spots beads on the glass, guess what? The detective knows the suspect is lying.It's dead easy…so read on dear Watson. The game's afoot!About the AuthorNicola pens mysteries, creates and produces interactive children’s books for the iPad, podcasts about genre writing (The Novel Experience), blogs about and publishes e-books and produces promotional book trailers…when she’s not playing hockey, growing blue poppies or eating chocolate fudge....

Title : Youdunit Whodunit! How to Write Mysteries
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 8425775
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 37 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Youdunit Whodunit! How to Write Mysteries Reviews

  • Kenya Wright
    2019-03-27 02:30

    Decent reference book for writing mystery. It was good as a refreasher.

  • Ericka Thompson
    2019-04-14 05:26

    Excellent introductionThis is a really good read for a beginner. However there are nuggets of wisdom even the expert writer could use. It's written in a conversational tone. A quick read. Not a step by step how to. Reads more like a series of blog posts on a writers website.

  • Ana Bolox
    2019-03-25 06:46

    Bastante bueno. Me ha gustado mucho. Es claro, conciso, va al grano y aporta un buen método que no tienes por qué seguir al pie de la letra, pero del que puedes aprender y adaptar a tus necesidades.Muy recomendable para los escritores de novela policíaca.

  • J. Rosemary Moss
    2019-04-04 06:37

    A brisk, informative read for new-comers to the mystery genre.