Read Creating Sanctuary: Toward the Evolution of Sane Societies by Sandra L. Bloom Online

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In Creating Sanctuary, Dr. Sandra Bloom argues that our society is sick: we are emotionally numb, addicted to violence, alienated from ourselves and each other, and trapped in a vicious cycle of destructive behavior. By applying the successes from her treatment programs with severely traumatized individuals to larger group and social organizations, Dr. Bloom offers insightIn Creating Sanctuary, Dr. Sandra Bloom argues that our society is sick: we are emotionally numb, addicted to violence, alienated from ourselves and each other, and trapped in a vicious cycle of destructive behavior. By applying the successes from her treatment programs with severely traumatized individuals to larger group and social organizations, Dr. Bloom offers insights into how we can create safe environments that promote well-being....

Title : Creating Sanctuary: Toward the Evolution of Sane Societies
Author :
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ISBN : 9780415918589
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Creating Sanctuary: Toward the Evolution of Sane Societies Reviews

  • Aunnalea
    2019-03-20 21:57

    Everyone who ever works with people should read this book. Seriously.

  • Lyn Hill
    2019-03-04 00:43

    First of all, do no harm.If only everyone who works with trauma survivors knew how to follow this rule...Sandra Bloom's three books regarding appropriate environments for trauma survivors are must-reads for professionals and families who deal with trauma survivors. I hope this gets much wider attention--mental health care often humiliates and endangers when it should protect and heal.Sandra Bloom emphasizes the need for safety in all three of her books--a subject which is sadly neglected by authors pushing quick solutions and promises of healing.On the top of the must-read list about trauma (for just about everyone) is The Body Keeps the Score by its leading researcher, Bessel van der Kolk. The Trauma section of Judith Herman's classic Trauma and Recovery is recommended reading on the history of trauma treatment--especially for victims of abuse and soldiers.Victims of severe trauma who need safe alternatives to talk therapy can also find guidance in Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal by Belleruth Naparstek.

  • Alissa
    2019-03-13 23:02

    I read this for one of my classes and it was really an excellent description of how to work with people from a trauma informed perspective. Sandra Bloom is extremely passionate about this subject and her talks on trauma are all very informative as well.

  • Erin Drake
    2019-03-04 20:53

    Creating Sanctuary is a courageous and insightful read. Having worked as an activist and psychiatrist for decades, Sandra Bloom's work both defines and describes the sickness that pervades modern society, investigates how we got this way and provides a framework (at times vague though perhaps necessarily so) for how we can begin to heal ourselves both individually and collectively. Her tone is honest, critical and urgent. Her approach to problem solving is straightforward and practical.Dr. Bloom argues that psychic health is virtually impossible in our society because we have become desensitized to violence, we have normalized repression, and we have created institutions that serve only repeatedly traumatize the most vulnerable among us. She explains, “A psychiatric label is a heavy burden to carry. And psychiatric labels often become self-fulfilling prophecies. If a patient’s social group expects them to ‘be bad,’ they will definitely ‘be bad’... All of us are strongly influenced by social expectations and social pressure. We do not create pathological behavior, but any social system can encourage it or discourage it” (p.173-174). Dr. Bloom also executes a thorough exploration of ongoing cycles of trauma in postmodern society and dares to define violence as more than emotional, physical, and sexual abuse. She suggests that allowing children to go hungry or homeless, denying them a quality education or medical care, and tolerating laws and policies that perpetuate these conditions are all forms of violence. Bloom suggests that these hostile acts – unaddressed, regulated, permitted, accepted - are perpetually shaping our culture and threatening the very possibility of our healthy existence. “For the most part, we have lost our awareness of the true social nature of human existence, of tragic consciousness…. Within our segregated, individualized, demystified, and fragmented lives we avoid resonating with the suffering of others. We are not our brother’s keepers” (p.250-251). Bloom is also realistic about what it will take to begin healing our world and avoids sweeping assumptions and “band aid” solutions in this regard. She suggests that slow, steady work in the spirit of togetherness is key. She implores us to consider difficult questions. “’What is it we are actually doing, and what are we trying to achieve’” (p.256)? I found these sorts of questions to be both thought provoking and inspiring and Creating Sanctuary to be brave work by a brilliant mind.