Read The Pirate Woman by A.E. Dingle Online

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Captain Aylward Edward Dingle (1874-1947), who also wrote under the pseudonyms Brian Cotterell and Sinbad, was the British author of: Gold Out of Celebes (1920), A Modern Sinbad (1933), Spin: A Yarn Sailor (1934), Sinister Eden (1934), Red Saunders: The Chronicle of a Genial Outcast (1934), Not Wisely (1936), Mary: First Mate (1937), Nor Breed Nor Birth (1937), Mock Star (Captain Aylward Edward Dingle (1874-1947), who also wrote under the pseudonyms Brian Cotterell and Sinbad, was the British author of: Gold Out of Celebes (1920), A Modern Sinbad (1933), Spin: A Yarn Sailor (1934), Sinister Eden (1934), Red Saunders: The Chronicle of a Genial Outcast (1934), Not Wisely (1936), Mary: First Mate (1937), Nor Breed Nor Birth (1937), Mock Star (1938), Nita of Martinique (1938), Adrift (1939), The Bomb Ship (1942), Pirates May Fly (1943), Old Glory (1945), "Black Joker" (1946), Reckless Tide (1947), The Petrel's Path (1947), The Corpse Came Back (1948) and Out of the Blue (1948)....

Title : The Pirate Woman
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781409988281
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 176 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Pirate Woman Reviews

  • Debbie Zapata
    2019-03-12 09:19

    I needed a book set in the Caribbean for a challenge, so I scrolled through my list of pirate titles and decided on one by Captain Dingle. There is a very short article about him at Wiki, but Dingle's GR author page offers this link to a fascinating blog post about his life http://pulpflakes.blogspot.mx/2012/09...This particular story, The Pirate Woman, was published as a serial in four November 1918 issues of All-Story Weekly magazine. Now I know my start date says May 31, but I could not actually start reading until around June 3. (Darn that old real life!) Then I zipped through the story, and felt sorry for the people who had to wait a whole week before they found out What Happened Next. There were 25 chapters, and after every sixth one or so, there was the dreaded notice TO BE CONTINUED NEXT WEEK. Don't forget this magazine is issued weekly, and that you will get the continuation of this story without waiting a month.As if that would make a reader feel better! Luckily, Gutenberg has the entire story in one easy link here http://www.gutenberg.org/files/30057/...So, what happens to our Pirate Woman? Well, her father, Red Jabez, dies in the opening paragraphs, leaving her as leader of his band of scurvy sea-dogs, and heir to his treasure. Dolores also inherits Milo, her father's bodyguard and the man who taught her most of what she knows about fighting. But does Dolores really want to be a pirate queen? Or does she dream of the real world out beyond her island stronghold, the world that created all the priceless treasures hidden away in her father's secret cave, the world that is forbidden to her because of the price on her head? Then there are the three friends who arrive on a schooner. Rich, idle young men who have become bored with their sailing tour of the Caribbean. Will stumbling upon the pirate island cure them of their boredom? Which of them (if any) will win the beautiful Dolores and her treasure?I wanted to be a pirate for quite awhile when I was younger. I blame it on Treasure Island and my Dad's exciting way of reading the book aloud to my brother down the hall from me. I was not supposed to listen. (It was a boy's book, according to Mom.) But in all my youthful yo-ho-ho fantasies, I never imagined myself as complex a lady pirate as Dolores proved herself to be. This is a story full of lust and greed in many forms, for many things. It was a quick, entertaining read and I am just sorry that of the many books written by Captain Dingle, there is so far only one other one listed at Gutenberg. I plan to get to it Someday, to be sure!