Read Miles to Go by Richard Paul Evans Online

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Alan Christoffersen, a once-successful advertising executive, wakes one morning to find himself injured, alone, and confined to a hospital bed in Spokane, Washington. Sixteen days earlier, reeling from the sudden loss of his wife, his home, and his business, Alan left everything he knew behind and set off on an extraordinary cross-country journey. Carrying only a backpack,Alan Christoffersen, a once-successful advertising executive, wakes one morning to find himself injured, alone, and confined to a hospital bed in Spokane, Washington. Sixteen days earlier, reeling from the sudden loss of his wife, his home, and his business, Alan left everything he knew behind and set off on an extraordinary cross-country journey. Carrying only a backpack, he planned to walk to Key West, the farthest destination on his map. But a vicious roadside stabbing has interrupted Alan’s trek and robbed him of his one source of solace: the ability to walk.Homeless and facing months of difficult recovery, Alan has nowhere to turn—until a mysterious woman enters his life and invites him into her home. Generous and kind, Angel seems almost too good to be true, but all is not as it appears. Alan soon realizes that before he can return to his own journey, he must first help Angel with hers.From one of America’s most beloved and bestselling storytellers comes an astonishing tale of life and death, love and second chances, and why sometimes the best way to heal your own suffering is by helping to heal someone else’s.Inspiring, moving, and full of wisdom, Miles to Go picks up where the bestseller The Walk left off, continuing the unforgettable series about one man’s unrelenting search for hope....

Title : Miles to Go
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781439191378
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Miles to Go Reviews

  • Starjustin
    2019-01-28 18:59

    I loved this book. Richard Paul Evans, as an author, is outstanding in expressing the importance of other people that touch your life in some way that you and that person are changed forever in a very positive way. I am looking forward to book 3 in the series.

  • Joy Gerbode
    2019-02-03 22:13

    Ok ... this is God talking for sure! After finishing the first book, I wanted to read the 2nd. I was in WalMart, heading from the groceries to the books, when I prayed: "God, I know You have more important things to think about than whether the store has the book I want, but I also know You care about the details of my life, so if that book is on the shelf, please help me to see it." I walked all down the book aisle, looking in every section, and did not see the book. There was a clearance bin, and I stopped to look at the children's books, but nearly passed over the other side. However, some book caught my eye, and as I picked it up, underneath it, was "Miles to Go" ... the very book I was searching for. My eyes teared up, because that was absolutely God saying to me, "I do care about the details of your life."Was the book worth it? Absolutely! As good as the first one, just a different part of the journey. This one was especially interesting to me, because I grew up in Montana, so many of the places he walked in this book were familiar haunts to me. More poignant lessons, more gripping story, with humor, mystery, drama, adventure, and lots of wonderful relationships. Now, however, I have to wait a bit for the 3rd book ... and then I'll have to wait till next May for # 4!

  • Leila
    2019-02-19 21:44

    This was an unusual book but I find these journeys/pilgrimages are often not just interesting but touching deeply as they provide an insight into the author's mindset too. The book lost a star for me because of the constant descriptions of food and the many different types he ate on the way. Apart from that I did find the book interesting to read. There are many parts of sadness and some in depth portraits of the people he met on his long journey by foot. I am keeping this short because I am without a PC at the moment and I am using my new tablet for the first time and I am unused to how sensitive the touch typing I'm now having to use. I've already messed up my previous review of The Pillars of Rome so hopefully you will be patient with me. Thank goodness for the predictive spelling and choice of words to help. Overall I liked this first book in the series and will be reading the next book in the series so recommended if you like this sort of book. I watched a DVD named "The Way" I think starring Martin Sheen and Jamestown Newbottle which again is interesting and thoughtful if you found this type of story appeals to you. It's not for everyone though. .F

  • Francis Gahren
    2019-02-11 22:02

    My TakeA beautiful, well-written second book in The Walk series, this book is rich in life lessons and character development, two things I love in a novel. Evans’ chapters are short and impacting – it makes you feel like you are zipping through the book (I read it in two days). I like the title and how it is taken from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost (shown below) – I’ve always loved this poem.There are really three stories going on here – Alan Christoffersen’s, a woman he meets on the highway names Angel, and Kailamai’s – a young girl running away from her most recent foster home. Alan is reeling from the untimely death of his wife, McKale, and also the loss of his business and home from a rather unscrupulous business partner. In Spokane, he is recovering from three knife wounds he suffered just outside of town, when he was mugged by three punks but saved by two truckers with a shotgun. He recuperates in Angel’s apartment and learns about her bout with depression and suicide, and he is able to help her start her life again. The story of their Thanksgiving and Christmas together with Bill, the caretaker and owner who lost his wife recently, and Christine, a college student living in another apartment, is poignant.Alan has a reconciliation with his father, who comes out to see him and make sure he is ok. When Spring rolls around, Alan is finally fit enough to continue his walk. He travels from Spokane to upper Idaho (Coeur d’Alene-Kellog-Wallace) where he meets Kailamai (he says her from a bunch of gang-bangers) with his 9mm pistol that his father gave him (good to see some common sense creep in here). She is a run-away from a foster home and has had a terrible life up to this point, but she is the most hopeful person he has ever met. Alan plans it out so that Angel (now Nicole) meets them just before he enters Yellowstone National Park to bring Kailamai back to Spokane with her and enroll her in school.Alan continues on – alone again. His trek through Wyoming is very boring (see quotes below) – I wonder if they ticked him off some how when he asked for information about their state (or maybe during his own travels?). In any case, it picks up again when he enters South Dakota, and his description of Korczak Ziolkowski and his work on the Crazy Horse monument is extremely interesting (see pp. 310-311).The ending is very ambiguous - I hate it! He notices an older woman in the hotel lobby who knows him who says “I’ve been looking for you for weeks” and boom, the book is over. Boo!SummaryAlan Christoffersen, a once-successful advertising executive, wakes one morning to find himself injured, alone, and confined to a hospital bed in Spokane, Washington. Sixteen days earlier, reeling from the sudden loss of his wife, his home, and his business, Alan left everything he knew behind and set off on an extraordinary cross-country journey. Carrying only a backpack, he planned to walk to Key West, the farthest destination on his map. But a vicious roadside stabbing has interrupted Alan’s trek and robbed him of his one source of solace: the ability to walk. Homeless and facing months of difficult recovery, Alan has nowhere to turn—until a mysterious woman enters his life and invites him into her home. Generous and kind, Angel seems almost too good to be true, but all is not as it appears. Alan soon realizes that before he can return to his own journey, he must first help Angel with hers. From one of America’s most beloved and bestselling storytellers comes an astonishing tale of life and death, love and second chances, and why sometimes the best way to heal your own suffering is by helping to heal someone else’s. Inspiring, moving, and full of wisdom, Miles to Go picks up where the bestseller The Walk left off, continuing the unforgettable series about one man’s unrelenting search for hope.QuotesThis is story of contrasts-about living and dying, hope and despair, pain and healing, and the tenuous, thin places between both extremes where most of us reside. (p. 6)The sun will rise again. The only uncertainty is whether or not we will rise to greet it. (Prologue)Sometimes Mother Nature has PMS. (Chapter Four – describing his wedding day)There are people who come into our lives as welcome as a cool breeze in summer – and last about as long. (Chapter Seven-describing how much Norma, the nurse, helped him)People aren’t wired to be alone. Even in the stressful population of prison, solitary confinement is still considered a cruel punishment. (Chapter Thirteen-Mom underlined this when she read it)There can be no job without gratitude. (Chapter Twenty-one)My father came. No matter what he said, his search for me spoke louder. (Chapter Twenty-two)Then pealed the bells more loud and deep;“God is not dead, nor doth He sleep.” -Longfellow (Chapter Twenty-seven)My mother always said that the shortest path to healing was to heal someone else. (p. 166)“How’s Seattle?” I asked. “Rain,” she said. (p. 175)Old friends are memories personified. (Chapter Thirty)Forgiveness is the key to the heart’s shackles. (Chapter Thirty-four)I don’t think it as much a human foible as it is a human curse that we cannot understand the beauty of a thing until it is gone. (Chapter Thirty-five) My father liked to drive at night and I slept for most of the ride home. I still remember the feel and smell of cold vinyl against my face. Somehow I woke in my own bed, the soft white sheets tucked in around me. I miss that. Childhood is magical that way. (p.292)Nothing clears the mind (nor colon) like an encounter with a grizzly bear. (293)The Wild West has never been so dull. (p.301)I’ve known people from Wyoming and I’ve heard tale of its rugged beauty and friendly folksy inhabitants, but honestly, in this part of the state, I didn’t feel it. (p. 303)Crossing from Wyoming into South Dakota was like the moment Dorothy emerged from her re-located Kansas home in the magical, Technicolor world of Oz. (p. 306)

  • Tiffany
    2019-02-01 16:44

    I picked up Miles to Go by Richard Paul Evans on purpose. I'm not a fan of his writing, but I wanted an uplifting book for the holidays. Reading it reminded me of why I'm not a fan of his writing. It should have been an uplifting book. It had all the parts of the formula: sad story, characters overcoming hard times, a happy ending. The problem was it had all the parts of the formula. All of his books follow the same formula and when I read them, I get bored. There are no surprises, no suspense, no mysteries. I can't even cheer for the characters because they lack personalities. They are cookie cutter gingerbread people without any unique decorations.His writing is also bland. He likes to tell the story, rather than show us. This subtle change makes a huge difference to the reader. When I hear about the characters and what they feel, rather than experience it with them, they are removed from me. I am just the reader, rather than a part of their world. When I am part of their world, I care deeply about them and want to know what happens to them. Writers do this by showing us what they are going through, rather than just saying things like, "She was depressed."There were great things about this book. I loved some of the quotes the characters said. They sounded like inspirational posters. The trouble was without an interesting character to connect the quotes in my mind, the quotes were easily forgotten. I also enjoyed the story on the Good Samaritan experiment. I was so intrigued by this story, I Googled the experiment to find out more.Unfortunately, it wasn't enough to make me like the book. I didn't even feel like talking about the book when I was done, and you know how much I love talking about books I am reading.It was an okay book, but like the characters, it will be easily forgotten. If you are looking for an inspirational read for the holidays, pick up a Mitch Albom book. His books will be ones you will not forget.

  • Mj
    2019-02-10 20:03

    Easy read. Enjoyable. Uplifting. Picked it up shortly after reading the first book in the series The Walk because I enjoyed it so much.

  • Ray
    2019-02-21 19:05

    I found the second book of this series as compelling and touching as the first. I think I have found an author that I am very inspired by. He writes a tale that is gripping, realistic, and emotional. I think if you haven't read anything by him, you should give it a try. It might not be your type of story, but I think you will be effected by the time you finish it. I am continuing my journey into the third book. Hope you are out there on road with me.

  • Louise
    2019-01-28 17:03

    NOTE*** The second journal of “The Walk” series. The first was titled: “The Walk”. MILES TO GO continues where The Walk left off. Book 3 will be released in April 2012.Alan Christoffersen, thirty-two-years old, is writing the second journal of his walk from a hospital bed. His plan to walk to Key West, Florida from Seattle, Washington was interrupted when he was mugged, stabbed, and left to die on the side of the road in Spokane, Washington. Sixteen weeks earlier, within a 5-week period, Alan lost his precious wife, McKale, his home, and his business. He decided to leave everything behind and go on a cross country journey, walking! He chose to walk to Key West, Florida a 3,500 mile walk because it was the furthest point on his map. But the unexpected attack has interrupted Alan’s journey. He is facing months of hard recovery and has nowhere to live until he meets a woman named, Angel, who is sitting beside his bed when he wakes up. Alan had previously lived in a 2 million dollar home, was a highly successful advertising executive, and was married to his gorgeous and beloved wife, McKale. Alan’s partner in his advertising business, Craig, stole his clients while he was at the hospital caring for McKale. After his business went under and he lost everything, he had his assistant, Falene, liqudate office furniture and other items and deposit the money into a bank account to finance his walk. In order to survive, he just packed up and started his trek to Key West in order to survive. This is a story of: “contrasts, about living and dying, about suffering and pain, about loss and emotions, and hope, despair and healing. Alan doesn’t know yet whether he is walking away from his past, or into his future”.Come with me on this walk as we follow along with Alan for this is truly an unbelievable walk and he learns important life lessons from the people he meets, and leaves them with a bit of his own wisdom.

  • Cydnie
    2019-01-25 16:55

    I'm not quite sure why I keep reading books by RPE... I guess I keep hoping that I'll really like one eventually. Things I liked:1) I love the character of Falene, a beautiful woman who is not swayed by the gawking men and does things because it's the right thing to do.2) Two new characters, Angel and Kailamai. Very distinct personalities, well written so that I could picture them. Angel seemed a bit bi-polar for a while, but then things were explained.3) Some great phrases that are profound, most coming from the chapter headings. "...it's difficult to believe that someone with so many trials could harbor such hope, as that there are those with so much advantage who harbor such hopelessness."4) The map at the beginning of each book showing his travel plans.Things I didn't like:1) His writing is okay, moments of wonderful phrases that make me say, "wow", followed by mundane. 2) I got tired of the word 'surprisingly'. "It was surprisingly good", "he was surprisingly----", etc... Really overused.3) I'm still tired of reading about what he eats....4) I'm still bugged about the initial timeline that started this series. The foreclosure on the home seemed really quick, where were all of the letters of warning? Had McKale hidden them from him? That wasn't explained.5) At the beginning of each book we're told that we are reading Alan's journal, but only the chapter headings read like a journal, the rest reads like what it is--- the story. Hmm...6) Poor proof-reading. Page 86- "I didn't even know her last name." Well, if I'm supposed to be reading his journal it's on page 70. Also, who says, "bottles of toothpaste"?That being said...I guess I'll have to keep reading just to see if Alan gets to Key West. Thank goodness for library checkout and bookstore clearance tables.

  • Wendi
    2019-02-06 16:55

    Miles To Go (The Second Journal of The Walk Series)By Richard Paul EvansPublished by Simon & SchusterIn this second journal in the series, Alan Christoffersen awakens in a hospital bed after a brutal roadside attack. Lucky to be alive, Alan is visited daily by a woman named ‘Angel’ he recently helped while on his walk. A true blessing, Angel invites Alan to complete his recovery at her home; however, Alan soon discovers that it is Angel who’s in real need of healing.As one person’s soul mends, the light of their transformation illuminates those around them; a chain reaction of blessings. And so, with new friends, comfort and strength, Alan once again sets out for Key West, Florida. Along his route he meets some amazing people and sees some of America’s most spectacular wonders. Yet his journey is far from over and it will take all the resilience he has to endure.Miles To Go “is a story of contrasts⎯about living and dying, hope and despair, pain and healing, and the tenuous, thin places between both extremes where most of us reside.”

  • Regina Spiker
    2019-02-13 23:07

    The continuation of The Walk by Richard Paul Evans. In this small novel Alan wakes up in a hospital in Spokane, Washington with three knife wounds to his stomach, inflicted by a gang. He has only walked 318 of the 3,500 miles in his journey from Seattle to Key West, Florida. Alan has lost everything important in his life and walks, with only the bare necessities on his back, to get through the pain - well he did, until he was jumped by the gang outside Spokane. Now, lying in a hospital bed regaining his strength, Alan wonders how he will get through the day, let alone the upcoming months of recuperation. A good samaritan, by the name of Angel, offers to take him home and care for him until he's back on his feet and able to travel again. Can Angel and Alan help each other heal from their own personal tragedies? My 18 year old daughter read the first in this emotional series and eagerly awaited Miles to Go. Two nights of staying up until 3am and it was finished - she said she couldn't put it down.

  • Barb
    2019-02-18 21:08

    This is book #2 in a 5 part Walk series by the author. I liked this enough that I am going back to read the first one and am on the library waiting list for the other 3. It is a reflective, thoughtful and inspirational read. As a quote in the book said "We plan our lives in long, unbroken stretches that intersect our dreams the way highways connect the city dots on a road map. But in the end we learn that life is lived in the side roads, alleys, and detours."

  • Sue Klasing
    2019-02-18 15:03

    I like this author and always enjoy his writing, this book definitely sets the stage for a very long series.

  • Heather
    2019-01-24 16:59

    Another Richard Paul Evans classic. The continuation of Alan's journey as he walks across the nation to find healing after his wife's death.

  • Vannetta Chapman
    2019-02-08 22:59

    Another very well done book.I'm hooked on this series!

  • Kikirocks
    2019-02-04 23:09

    I really like the first book but this book, even though it is fiction, is a little bit 'too much' with all the troubled people he meets on his walk. It just seems to unrealistic. And some parts of the book feel too rushed while others are too long and too elaborated. I will eventually continue reading this series because this book ended with another cliffhanger and I want to know how it all ends. I just don't know when I will start with book 3.

  • Tina
    2019-02-21 15:57

    Second book in the series and again love the writing of Richard Paul Evans. Never want to put down the book and keeps me just wanting to sit and read forever! Great story line and love each character. Since a new character was introduced at the end...must go and read and see what Book three holds!Love his writing!

  • Kathy Robbins
    2019-01-28 21:10

    I've decided that any book that makes me cry deserves 5 stars. Can't wait to continue reading the series.

  • Tim Chavel
    2019-02-05 15:48

    Richard Paul Evans continues his wonderful Walk series in book 2. This book is so enjoyable. Once you start reading it you do not want to put it down. The stories seem so real to life. The characters make you want to love them. I have included several quotes and I understand the quotes from this book will not do them justice until you read them in the book and see them in context. But, the quotes are to good to be left out of my blog. So here they are:We plan our lives in long, unbroken stretches that intersect our dreams the way highways connect the city dots on a road map. But in the end we learn that life is lived in the side roads, alleys, and detours.We do not take a trip; a trip takes us. ~SteinbeckLife is what happens to us while we’re planning something else.Affectus, qui passio est, desinit esse passio simulatque eius claram et distinctam formamus ideam. Translated means “Emotion, which is suffering, stops … no … ceases to be suffering when a clear and distinct idea is formed.Psychologists tested the story of the Good Samaritan. What they learned gives us reason to pause. The greatest determinant of who stopped to help the stranger in need was not compassion, morality, or religious creed. It was those who had the time. Makes me wonder if I have time to do good. There are people who come into our lives as welcome a a cool breeze in summer – and last about as long.People aren’t wired to be alone. Even in the stressful population of prison, solitary confinement is still considered a cruel punishment.We humans are born egocentric. The sky thunders and children believe that God is mad at them for something they’ve done – parents divorce and children believe it’s their fault for not being good enough. Growing up means putting aside our egocentricity for truth. Still, some people cling to this childish mind-set. As painful as their self-flagellation may be, they’d rather believe their crises are their fault so they can believe they have control. In doing so they make fools and false gods of themselves.The first step of a journey is always the longest.There can be no joy without gratitude.Developing a friendship is like feeding squirrels at the park. At first it’s all grab and go. But with gentle motion, time and consistency, soon they’re eating from your hand.There are two kinds of people. Those who climb mountains and those who sit in the shadow of the mountains and critique the climbers.When a man loses his vision of the future he dies.Old friends are memories personified.Forgiveness is the key to the heart’s shackles.I don’t think it is as much a human foible as it is a human curse that we cannot understand the beauty of a thing until it is gone.There are two kinds of suffering in this life. That which pursues us and that which we doggedly pursue.It’s almost as difficult to believe that someone with so many trials could harbor such hope, as that there are those with so much advantage who harbor such hopelessness.There’s no problem so big that whining won’t make it worse.Everyone has problems. It’s how you choose to deal with them. Some people choose to be whiners some choose to be winners. Some choose to be victims some choose to be victors.There are times when the great Cosmic Architect gives us brief glimpses of the blueprint so we can do our part.Some men see mountains as obstacles. Others as a canvas.We are all in motion. Always. Those who are not climbing toward something are descending toward nothing.Without great mountains we cannot reach great heights.If you will read this book you will be encouraged in your daily life!

  • Michelle
    2019-02-07 17:11

    I like the inspiring verses infused throughout Miles to Go by Richard Paul Evans. As Alan Christoffersen writes in his journal of his journey walking across the United States we learn a lot of life lessons. We learn to be winners and not whiners, to be victors not victims. We learn not to pursue suffering. We learn that when a man loses his vision of the future he dies because if there is no future, there is no now. We learn that in the end we own nothing. The shortest path to healing is to heal someone else. We learn that through the loss of a loved one we can let their memory be a spring of gratitude or a fountain of bitterness, and we have to decide which. We learn to journal, and form a clear picture of our suffering, and then, when we do that, it ceases to be suffering. It teaches us to have time to do good, like the good Samaritan did. It taught me to focus on the why, and the how will take care of itself. We learn to find some way to take small steps toward something great because each small step is an act of faith and hope, affirming that life is worth living. We are all in motion, always. Those who are not climbing toward something are descending toward nothing. And that "the secret of survival is to climb, even in the dark, even when the climb seems pointless. The climb, not the summit is the thing. And the great don't just climb mountains, they carve them as they go." And that "you only have to live long enough to inspire others to do great things" as Polish sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski did.And my favorite: "For there are moments in all lives, great and small, that we must trudge alone our forlorn roads into infinite wilderness, to endure our midnight hours of pain and sorrow--the Gethsemane moments, when we are on our knees or backs, crying out to a universe that seems to have abandoned us. These are the greatest of moments where we show our souls. These are our 'finest hours'. That these moments are given to us is neither accidental nor cruel. Without great mountains we cannot reach great heights. And we were born to reach great heights." Need I say more? This was a thought-provoking, inspiring story that left me feeling like I can conquer anything. I also loved when he reached Mount Rushmore, and Crazy Horse in this book, as we just went there this past summer and I resonated with his thoughts exactly. Those 2 monuments inspire me to greatness as well, if they can carve those huge rocks even when everyone is telling them they are crazy, and all odds seem to be against them, then I can do anything!!! I really liked this book.

  • Kat
    2019-01-25 23:10

    i wrote to his web page, asking about the contest, they don't ask for your address. richards assistant wrote me back, she told me people don't respond so if i sent my address i would be the winner. i did and i got the book. i thought it was 'the walk' but after i started reading it, i realized it was 'miles to go' which continues 'the walk'. i should have re read 'the walk' before reading this but i didn't. i re read both againso far it is REALLY good. short chapters make it easy to stop when i have to it's about the man, his wife died, she had a horse accident that left her paralyzed and she got a infection.at the same time his business partner was stealing from him while he was dealing with his sick wife that he loved so muchso he lost his wife, business and home all in the same month.he decided to walk from Seattle to Florida, on his way, he didn't get far, he was stabbed and this is where the book picks up, a lady he had helped change her tire had given him her card. so the hospital called her and she came to see him. he ends up staying at her house till he can walk again and the snow melts. he comes into her life to help her, her son died in a car accident while she was driving. she didn't want to live anymorei just started it yesterday afternoon and that's where i am so far. trying to make it last! I'm so glad i wrote to them so i could win the book. he signed it and it has a embossed seal on the page.needless to say i was disappointed with the end. it left off like in mid sentence, only to be continued in the next book im sure. i hope i re read this before i read the next one, they take so long to come out i forget by the time i get ithe continued his walk, met a young girl, called the lady that helped him recover after his accident, seh drove out and took the girl to go home with her to go to school. so he continues walking, gets depressed, and runs into some woman who knows him and has been looking for him and thats how it ends.

  • Mark Soone
    2019-02-15 15:11

    Wow, this has been one of my favorite stories or series in some time! I wasn't quite as excited about the potential of this book due to the fact that it began with rehabilitation rather than the journey...But the quality of writing, and depth of relationships and personal introspection quickly dispelled that notion.We join Alan as he recovers from his knife wounds, with new friend Angel...As caring as she is he sees that she has her own buried hurts and secrets. They develop a pure and natural friendship, that pushes the barriers of comfort as the grow closer with one another. A simple reminder that although we are all on different journies, we all have our own unique set of baggage, hurts and scars....and to shelter ourselves we build a myriad of walls to keep people at a distance. This portion of the walk takes us through his recover, his new friendship with Angel and watching them help one another to heal and reconcile themselves with their inner turmoil. We also get to see Alan reconnect with an old friend and his dad.....Finally about 2/3rds of the way through his journey resumes....and as anxious as I was for his journey when the book began, I now equally dreaded it....Because much as the characters in the book, I also hate good bys and see ya laters! Alan continues to meet new people and develop new relationships with some cool and unique people. It helps to restore faith in humanity to those who are jaded or as Kayla says...I thought all guys were like that...Alan says far from it!What a cool story I can't wait to see where Alan and his journey (Both physical and insightful) takes us next!

  • Angie
    2019-02-15 20:13

    I liked this second book of The Walk series. In this story, Allen Christoffersen is recovering from a roadside stabbing before he can continue his walk to Key West, Florida. I enjoyed reading how he was able to help "Angel" who took him into her apartment while he recovered---well, actually save her. I liked having more story to read this time and deeper character development, since he worked with people in longer intervals than just passing through towns. The end of the story got back to the went here, walked here, ate this, etc., journaling, but it was in places that I was actually touring on my own vacation in Yellowstone Park and through Cody, Wyoming---so that was fun to read descriptions of the same places that I was passing through. I look forward to continuing the series to find out what happens to him, if he really makes it all that distance, and what other people he's supposed to meet along the way. I appreciated that he received inspiration as to "why" he is walking in this book. At first, he thought it was because he was escaping his old life that came to a sudden ruin with the loss of his wife, home & business, but now he realizes that he is building a bridge to his future. He could "carve" his own mountain, by stopping feeling sorry for himself and what he could take from life, but learn what life was asking of him. He needed to chip away at his own character to build himself. All of us need to trudge along in life and will need to endure many hours of pain and sorrow, but without these "mountains" to climb, we would not reach great heights.

  • Brent Soderstrum
    2019-02-16 19:14

    This is Evan's second installment of his Walk series. I enjoyed this one as much as I did the first. This one starts of right where the first ended. Alan is in the hospital in Spokane after being attacked and stabbed by a gang. At his bedside is a lady who he had helped change her tire. She had given him her card and the police called her since they had no other contact. Her name is Angel which is amazing since Alan had a vision in which McKale, his dead wife, told him he wasn't ready to go home yet since he had more people to meet including Angel.Angel allows Alan to stay at her place during his rehabilitation and we learn more about her and all she has had to go through in life. Alan helps her deal with issues and gives her a reason to live.Other interesting characters appear for various amounts of time including Bill, Falence and Kailamia. They each have issues they have to face. Evans really makes it clear that we all face horrible things in our lives but there is a reason to keep going. I also like how Evans lets God play a part in his stories. I am looking forward to the next segment of the Walk. Alan is heading towards Iowa. Maybe I drove by him and didn't even pay attention......

  • Shelly
    2019-02-09 21:48

    Not as good as The Walk. I felt like Evans pushed this one, kind of like "I need a middle book so just write something". A lot of details I didn't need, like how to make a sandwich on the road - literally how to open the mayo packet etc. But in-between there were some real gems, note:"We plan our lives in long, unbroken stretches that intersect our dreams the way highways connect the city dots on a road map. But in the end we learn that life is lived in the side roads, alleys, and detours." p. 3LOVE THIS ONE: "I have found that the people who shout their opinion the loudest are ususally the ones most insecure in their position" p. 70"We humans are born egocentric. The sky thunders and children believe that God is mad at them for something they've done - parents divorce and chldren believe it's their fault for not being good enough. Growing up means putting aside our egocentricity for truth. Still, some people cling to this childish mind-set. As painful as their self-flagellation may be, they'd rather believe their crises are their fault so they can believe they have control. In doing so they make fools and false Gods of themselves." p.117"There can be no joy without gratitude" p.131

  • Mayda
    2019-02-01 21:44

    “Miles to Go”, the second journal of “The Walk” series by Richard Paul Evans, begins with Alan recovering from his near-death mugging. In this series, it is quite obvious that the story, like life, is not about the destination, it is about the journey. And it’s not just the simple act of getting from one place to another; it is the stops along the way and the chance meetings with others that define this story, as they affect Alan’s life. The author illustrates quite vividly how choosing a certain road, a certain fork in that road, a half-hidden path that leads uphill or down, makes the difference between happiness or despair, security or fear, life or death, for you or for those you have yet to meet. And with no more planning or thought than a coin toss. Even more thought-provoking are the journal entries themselves, snippets of truths and enlightenments, beautiful in their simplicity, profound in their meaning. Take time from your busy life, running here and there, to walk along with Alan. I received this book free from Goodreads First Reads.

  • Somer Schaffer
    2019-01-28 15:01

    I don't usually pick up books such as this one; inspirational, moving, journey books. I don't know why, maybe it's because I feel like they're mostly written from a shrink's point of view or something. I must say, I was entirely wrong when it came to this book and I'm glad I got it.Could you tell I liked it? I finished the entire book in under 24 hours. I didn't get much sleep last night because I couldn't put it down. Why? Maybe it's the constant suspense of the everlasting foreshadowing. Or perhaps it's that in every chapter something happens. It could be that there are so many inspirational characters to explore. The main character, Alan, learns a lot about himself in this story and in turn the reader may learn a lot about his or her self too. I know I did.It's a good story, amazing really. The author must have really thought this through, and it'd be hard to not like this book. As I said, I'm glad I picked it out and chose to read it first. I was not disappointed.

  • Ashley
    2019-02-11 16:10

    Well, Richard Paul Evans surely is good at leaving ya hanging. Now I have to wait a whole year before the next book in the series comes out, not fair! I am also curious how many books total will make up this series, cause it seems like there is still a long ways to go- especially if there are any more detours in the upcoming books like there were in this one. I was surprised by the character of Angel and touched to tears as Alan reaches out to Kailamai. I love the way that Alan is able to learn so much from characters like Bill and Christine. I am grateful for Alan's love and devotion to his wife who in times when he is most alone grieves deeply over. The end of this book is quite frustrating- who is this old woman? I can't wait to find out. Richard Paul Evans is an amazingly inspiration writer whose stories are quite unforgettable.

  • Christina Jones
    2019-01-31 17:07

    I went straight from Book 1 to Book 2, and while I liked the characters and plot lines as Al moved on with his walk, I found myself wishing the pace could be picked up just a little. Being human, I loved the revenge on Ralph and the problem solving of what to do with the teen age runaway, but by the end of this second book, we've only traveled a third of the way. At this rate, it'll take 10 books to get him to Key West. However, I will still give it four stars for making me think about how I approach life's struggles and what my feelings are concerning God, life, death, the afterlife (or not), and relationships with others. It's supposed to be an inspirational book, and it fulfills its purpose admirably.

  • Odetta
    2019-02-12 16:53

    I really don't like the way the author leaves the reader hanging. It took several chapters to finally get to the end of the story left hanging in the first book The Walk. My daughter downloaded this book from BARD so we could start listening to it as soon as we finishedThe Walk. I really like the way he was so kind to the girls, Angel & Kailamai. I added causes to my bookshelves because of Kailamai's story. Since the sequel to this book isn't available on Talking Books or BARD, we have it on hold at the local library. It isn't on the nice digital book format, but it's still audio.