Read The Secret Gospel by Morton Smith Online

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s/t: The Discovery & Interpretation of the Secret Gospel According to MarkThe Secret Gospel gives the 1st real evidence of the method by which Jesus of Nazareth initiated his disciples into the esoteric practices of his teaching, making this is a very important book for the history of humankind. In 1958, Morton Smith traveled to Jerusalem to do research in the monasters/t: The Discovery & Interpretation of the Secret Gospel According to MarkThe Secret Gospel gives the 1st real evidence of the method by which Jesus of Nazareth initiated his disciples into the esoteric practices of his teaching, making this is a very important book for the history of humankind. In 1958, Morton Smith traveled to Jerusalem to do research in the monastery library of Mar Saba in the Judean Desert. What he found was no routine corroboration of New Testament history, but a precious fragment of a 2nd-century document that would change the understanding of the work & teaching of Jesus. As exciting as the most suspenseful adventure story, Prof. Smith�s book is a lively readable account of the discovery & unraveling of some of Christianity�s most intriguing mysteries....

Title : The Secret Gospel
Author :
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ISBN : 9781570972034
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 157 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Secret Gospel Reviews

  • Erik Graff
    2019-06-22 04:53

    A secret gospel attributed to Mark is attested by patristic sources, something like the canonical one having been composed in Rome, the other in Alexandria. Now Morton Smith claims to have discovered a fragmentary copy of a letter by Clement of Alexandria answering questions about this gospel which he had received from a colleague dealing with Carpocratians who were quoting from it to confound him. Clement confirms the existence of the gospel, but says the Carpocratians were misrepresenting it, then goes on to correct those misrepresentations.Did Smith actually find such a document in 1958? This appears, now that his correspondence has been published posthumously, to be the case. Is it actually a letter by Clement of Alexandra? Here the evidence stems from a style analysis of the writing which Smith claims to be pretty conclusive. Is Clement correctly quoting the text of the Alexandrian Gospel of Mark in this letter? Here we cannot be certain as we have no holographs to compare it to. The Carpocratian version may have been superior.What Smith presents and what the two sets of photographic reproductions of the text show opens up a host of intriguing questions. First and foremost, the quest to reconstruct the Alexandrine Mark is renewed. References to it in the patristics, variants in the redactions of Mark, all may be studied anew with this in view. Second, what is the connection of this fragment with the story of the raising of Lazarus? Third, what is the connection of this fragment with the naked youth at Gethsemene? Fourth, what of the assertion that something like naked initiations were conducted by Jesus? Fifth, and this Smith, author of Jesus the Magician, covers, what is the contemporary context of such initiation rites and thaumaturgy?This book is the popular version of Clement of Alexandria and a Secret Gospel of Mark, a longer book which I would read later on in seminary upon the recommendation of one of Smith's colleagues, Cyril Richardson. As such, it is a bit of an adventure novel--if one thinks, as I do, that ferreting out the provenance of antique holograph is adventurous. The longer version, published at the same time, has the Greek citations to the texts supporting Smith's claims.

  • Simon
    2019-06-06 09:40

    Curious about the "Secret Gospel of Mark" and claims that it is a sophisticated scholarly hoax, I read Morton Smith's original popular account of his discovery and interpretation of the manuscript. In 1958 he found in the library of the monastery of Mar Saba near Jerusalem, a 17th century edition of the letters of Ignatius of Antioch. On blank pages at the back of this book someone using an 18th century handwriting style had copied a lost letter of Clement of Alexandria. This quotes two short passages from an extended version of the Gospel of Mark used by the church in Alexandria in the 2nd century (St Mark is traditionally credited with the evangelisation of Egypt). The problem is that Smith's analysis is based on photographs he took of the text. The monks have since secreted the book in Jerusalem where it is unavailable for further study. Bart Ehrman is suspicious of Smith's dedication of his popular book "FOR THE ONE WHO KNOWS", as if this implies only Smith knows whether he forged the letter or not (though in a Gnostic context, where salvation comes through self-knowledge, this dedication seems acceptable to me). I was, however, disturbed when Smith says in his preface, "I am shocked to find how much of it I have already forgotten. No doubt if the past, like a motion picture, could be replayed, I should also be shocked to find how much of the story I have already invented. Memory is perhaps more fallacious than forgetfulness. But here, at least, is what I think I remember." Is he playing games with the reader? To be fair to him the book is well-written, easy to follow and focuses on exploring whether the letter could be a forgery. At the end of his book in a footnote he ridicules some scholars' claims that he "forged the whole thing". His speculation that Jesus initiated converts into the Kingdom of Heaven through a secret baptismal rite is interesting (and surely not so shocking as to deserve suppression by Smith's opponents). In fact he is rather reserved in the expression of his ideas in view of the distinctly homoerotic implication of the longer of Clement's two quotations from the Gospel (this is perhaps understandable in a religious book published in 1973). The only solution to this controversy is the scientific dating of the ink used to copy the letter into the 17th century volume. That is presumably precisely why the monks, with a vested interest in discrediting Morton Smith's discovery, have made the book disappear.

  • M
    2019-05-31 08:07

    If true, proof that the Gospel of Mark may have been written shortly after the death of Jesus thus giving the gospel far more historical reliability. To me, it also supports the theory of Jesus's close relationship with the theology of the Essenes.

  • jeremy bradner
    2019-06-18 08:49

    read this because they talked about it in holy blood holy grail. interesting.