Read Imprisoned in Paradise: Japanese Internee Road Workers at the World War II Kooskia Internment Camp by Priscilla Wegars Online

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Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for the University of Idaho PressImprisoned in Paradise exposes the United States’s little-known World War II rendition of Japanese Latin Americans, including men kidnapped from their homes in Peru, Panama, and Mexico and interned at the Kooskia Camp in Idaho. Unlike Japanese Americans who have received an official apology anDistributed by the University of Nebraska Press for the University of Idaho PressImprisoned in Paradise exposes the United States’s little-known World War II rendition of Japanese Latin Americans, including men kidnapped from their homes in Peru, Panama, and Mexico and interned at the Kooskia Camp in Idaho. Unlike Japanese Americans who have received an official apology and redress from the U.S. government, the Japanese Latin Americans are still waiting to obtain justice for the violation of their human rights. Here, finally, is their story....

Title : Imprisoned in Paradise: Japanese Internee Road Workers at the World War II Kooskia Internment Camp
Author :
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ISBN : 9780893015503
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 323 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Imprisoned in Paradise: Japanese Internee Road Workers at the World War II Kooskia Internment Camp Reviews

  • Rrshively
    2018-08-29 19:15

    Compared to fiction, this would not be a 4 star book, but it is an excellent non-fiction book. Although it is scholarly, the author has the knack of making it interesting. I even found the grocery lists fascinating! The blurb about the book on Goodreads makes it sound as if the only Japanese men interned in this camp were from Latin America. They were only a small portion of the men. However, the men were all Japanese aliens and were not U.S. citizens even though some had lived in the U.S. for 40 years. According to U.S. law at that time, they were not allowed to become citizens although any of their children born in the U.S. were citizens. Working at this road building camp was voluntary. Many of the men thought it was preferable to other internment camps where they had nothing to do. Ironically, these men were treated better than Japanese-American citizens who were imprisoned in other types of camps. Because they were aliens, these men were protected by the Geneva Convention, and the government made sure that those provisions were followed. The book describes the conditions and daily life of these men as gleaned from the meager sources available today. Many of the men felt shamed and never told their families or friends about their experiences there. However, most of the men liked the setting, the treatment, and the opportunity of work. In the last chapter the author compares the treatment of these Japanese with the treatment of our prisoners in Gautanamo whom the U.S. Government has not treated according to the provisions of the Geneva Convention. I am wondering if we will be deeply sorry and ashamed someday for our treatment of those prisoners as we have been about our treatment of the Japanese.My daughter recently saw the location of the camp and went in with someone with underground sensing devices. She was fascinated by the story. As I live in Idaho, I plan to try to find this place the next time I follow highway 12 from Lewiston to Missoula.

  • Steven Shook
    2018-08-21 14:05

    Imprisoned in Paradise is one of two books authored Priscilla Wegars concerning the camp at Kooskia, Idaho, that should be read together. Wegars' other book concerning the Kooskia internment camp is titled As Rugged as the Terrain. While Terrain was published after Paradise, I would highly recommend that Terrain be read first since it covers the history of the camp at Kooskia before its use as a Japanese internment camp. Prior to being utilized as an internment camp, the Kooskia site was used as a Civilian Conservation Corps camp followed by a United State Bureau of Prisons work camp.Imprisoned in Paradise provides a detailed examination of a specific Japanese internment camp, providing a wealth of information concerning the prisoners living there and what life was like for them. It also provides a rather good glimpse of the individuals that managed the internment camp. Wegars' level of detail is amazing, indicating that an enormous amount of time was dedicated to researching the topic. I also very much appreciated the chapter endnotes. Many times while reading the book I felt as if I was experiencing life in the camp - the level of detail is that granular.I thought that quoting particular Articles of the Geneva Convention to begin each chapter was rather clever and tied each chapter's material together very well. As one might expect, the author explores the immoral, unethical, and illegal nature of Japanese internment camps in the United States. This 20/20 hindsight exploration occurs throughout the book. If I were the book's editor, however, then I would have left out these heavily judgment-laden remarks and used them instead in the final chapter. At times, I found the Wegars' comments concerning the legality of the internment camps distracting given the core topics of the various chapters (although her comments were absolutely true).The book is fascinating and very well written. Readers will not be disappointed.

  • Janice
    2018-08-28 15:09

    On a recent camping trip on the Lochsa we found the site of this internment camp. Very little remains there but we found it very moving to think of the lives of the men who spent the war years building the scenic Highway 12. I am enjoying the book which was chosen for an upcoming book club discussion.Update: Our group generally found the book interesting and readable. The author spoke to us and added her enthusiasm for the project.