Read The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca: Essays and Letters (De Providentia, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Clementia, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (selection)) by Seneca Moses Hadas Online

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In The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca, representative selections from Seneca's writings offer the reader an excellent introduction to the range of his work.The selections are drawn from the essays, or dialogues, and the "Consolations;" from the treatises, of which "On Clemency," addressed to the young Nero, is included here; and from the Letters to Lucilius, which have to do nIn The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca, representative selections from Seneca's writings offer the reader an excellent introduction to the range of his work.The selections are drawn from the essays, or dialogues, and the "Consolations;" from the treatises, of which "On Clemency," addressed to the young Nero, is included here; and from the Letters to Lucilius, which have to do not only with philosophical subjects but also with Seneca's personal experiences, such as journeys and visits.Moses Hadas has selected letters and essays which reveal Seneca's major philosophical themes—the relationship of the individual to society and to the gods; the meaning of pain and misfortune; man's attitudes to change, time, and death; and the nature of the highest good and of the happy life. In his Introduction, Professor Hadas discusses Seneca's life and work, tracing the history of his reputation; comments on Seneca's style; and outlines the origins and tenets of Stoicism.De Providentia, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Clementia, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (selection))...

Title : The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca: Essays and Letters (De Providentia, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Clementia, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (selection))
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ISBN : 9780393004595
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 261 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca: Essays and Letters (De Providentia, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Clementia, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (selection)) Reviews

  • JS Found
    2019-05-18 09:26

    I was going to just list the quotes from this book, but I have thirteen three by five pages of notes which are really all the lines of wisdom from all the essays and letters in this book. They are valuable. They say that life is not judged by externals--by what you have or don't have, by what you do or don't do, by what happens to you or what doesn't happen to, by fortune or fate--but by you yourself and your clear, free mind--a mind that practices the high and sole and perfect good of reason, a mind that does not hope because he knows that he will suffer but cares not, because all men suffer but that is not a mark of a life. All men die so why fear death? The Stoic mind will be prepared for anything and everything, will not tie his happiness to what happens to him, will not tie it to any circumstance befallen him, will not get swept away by the winds of emotion, but will be tranquil at all times. A man will lead a long life not because he lives long but because he lives well--and living well means recognizing that all he cherishes in life is temporary and subject to change, and that he is not dependent on that to live well. A philosophical life is the only life. Do not fall under the sway of ambition, appetite, lust, money, property. All these things are trappings one does not need. Be austere and self-controlled. Be prudent, wise, reasonable, thinking, temperate, magnanimous, laughing. Laugh at the foibles of life. Laugh in its face. Laugh at the human race Count your evils insignificant for they do not truly affect you, your core, your mind, your soul. Live simply, according to nature and to your own nature, become attuned with it for nature is only good. It leads towards the good. In loss, do not grieve inordinately. Do not grieve excessively. Always be learning, always be turning to philosophy which leads to wisdom. In philosophy, you belong to all of mankind. Love and welcome old age. Become accustomed to poverty so that when it hits you, you will not be shocked. Live according to your nature. God is with you and in you.

  • Michael
    2019-04-28 06:44

    Couldn't read much of this one after learning from the introduction what a vast disparity existed between Seneca's words and his deeds. His "philosophy" seems to me nothing more than a fraud, given how oppositely he lived his life. Of what I did read, the letter "On The Shortness of Life" was the most striking. Seneca spoke of how much of our limited time alive we fritter away in worthless pursuits, as though we had an infinite amount to our lifespans; and especially how much of our time we allow others to take from us -- as with a lawyer consumed by clients clamoring for his time, or as one wastes his days trying to curry favor with those higher up the social or professional ladder. "If such men wish to know how short their life is, let them think how small a fraction of it is their own." Very good advice, even if he did conclude that only philosophers truly appreciate and make good use of their time on earth.

  • Vanessa
    2019-05-01 06:50

    A highly readable collection of Seneca's thoughts on subjects ranging from slavery (treat your slaves like human beings, treat them as you would like to be treated) to balding vanity (Seneca describes his impatience with men who combed hair from one side of the head to the other to hide their balding pates). Who knew that the "comb-over" had such a long history?

  • Missy
    2019-05-22 10:31

    One of my favorite reads from Hum. 110. I picked up a copy of it last time I was at Powell's, as my freshman year copy has gone AWOL; can't wait to read it again.

  • SJ Loria
    2019-05-27 09:39

    It’s refreshing to read the Stoics. Their perspective on life is interesting and in many ways admirable. Don’t complain, appreciate what you have, build your character through study yet also through friendship, choose a good career, serve. It’s inspiring and I can see how some existentialists borrowed elements from this philosophy. However, it’s a bit reactionary this lifestyle and it neglects the emotions. If you have achieved the perfect stoic mindset, the death of a loved one wouldn’t move you to tears. I understand trying to downplay negative emotions and not living your life as captive to them, but there is an element of the emotions that I think gives life more meaning and deserves more attention that the stoics give to it. Either way, it’s interesting, very cool quotes to extract and a bit inspiring.Quotes:How much of your life has been pilfered by others without your being aware of it, how much of it you have lost, how much was dispensed on groundless regret, foolish gladness, greedy desire, polite society – and then realize that your death will be premature….Are you not ashamed to reserve for yourself only the tail end of your life and to allot to serious thought only such time as cannot be applied to business? How late an hour to begin to live when you must depart from life! 51It takes a great man, believe me, and one who rises high above human frailty, to allow none of his time to be frittered away; such a man’s life is very long because he devotes every available minute of it to himself. 55Everything future is uncertain; live now! 58Raise above the crowd…leave the ground, won’t you, and turn your mind to these things! 72It is harder for men to obtain release from themselves than from the law. 73Have faith in yourself and believe that you are traveling the right road and not being led astray by the zigzag tracks of hurrying wayfarers, many of whom go astray at the very roadside. 79Subjoin those who are immutable not by excess of constancy but of indolence; they live not as they choose but as they have begun. The malady has countless symptoms but its effect is uniform – dissatisfaction with self. This arises from an imbalance of the mind. 80The best course, as Athenodorus says, is to be employed in some active career, in political activity and civic functions…for when a man’s declared object is to make himself useful to his fellow citizens and to all mankind, he will exercise and improve his abilities by participating fully in demanding activities, serving both public and private interests as best he can…even in private life a large mind has ample scope for development. Man is not like lions and other creatures whose energies are restricted by being caged; man’s greatest achievements are carried out in private. 83Whenever chance impediments or the political situation make our active career impossible, far the best course is to season your leisure with activity; for never can all pursuits be so blocked off that there is no room left for honorable action. 86We must learn to strengthen self-restraint, curb luxury, temper ambition, moderate anger, view poverty calmly, cultivate frugality. 91We are all chained to Fortune. Some chains are golden and loose, some tight and of base metal; but what difference does it make…All life is bondage. Man must therefore habituate himself to his condition, complain of it as little as possible, and grasp whatever good lies within his reach. No situation is so harsh that a dispassionate mind cannot find some consolation in it. 93We ought to take the lighter view of things and cultivate tolerance; it is more civilized to laugh at life than to lament over it. 102It is important to withdraw into one’s self…But the two ought to be combined and alternated, some solitude, some society. 104

  • Bob Wilson
    2019-05-04 13:49

    One of my all time favorites. Along with Marcus Aurelius "Meditations" and Epictetus' "The Enchiridion" they are worth looking into and read at least once. I can pick up any one of these three books and dip in anywhere and damn if the Stoics didn't know what they were talking about. They were an influence on early Christianity of all things. (See Everett Ferguson's "Backgrounds of Early Christianity" --not 100% read yet, but it looks interesting. Also highly recommended for a terrific explanation of Stoic influence on modern life see "A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy" By William B Irvine. And a gut-churner: "Courage Under Fire: Testing Epictetus's Doctrines in a Laboratory of Human Behavior" By James B. Stockdale. (The lab was the Hanoi Hilton from 1965 until the early 70s.) Looking to buy a new copy because this one has pages falling out and it is worth owning. In my opinion

  • Scott
    2019-05-20 13:44

    As an interested reader of Stoicism, Seneca should be one of the "required authors" right up there with Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. The three have very different writing styles, even in translation. It is clear that Aurelius wrote "Meditations" in stolen moments on his military campaigns, when he could muster some time for reflection beyond dealing with the cares of his empire. Epictetus writes with a distance and remove, as if he talks about a worldly situation which he can observe entirely dispassionately. Seneca is all rhetoric and emotion, and he clearly uses all the flourishes and influences that an imperial senator would need to pursue his goals. I personally prefer the style of the writings of Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius, but I found lots of good insights here when I could get past the show.

  • Heather
    2019-05-04 10:42

    Regardless of the bleak rigor that Stoic philosophy itself often embraces, Seneca's essays and letters are engaging and thought-provoking. His training in rhetoric is evident, and he is a master of pithy, quotable lines. Historical context makes essays such as "On Clemency"--written from Seneca the tutor and adviser to an 18-year-old Nero--even more interesting. Moses Hadas has made wise selections and offers very readable translations.

  • Yuriy
    2019-05-04 13:34

    It's a good collection of Seneca's writing with a good introduction. "On Clemency", though it may be interesting historically, could be skipped because it is fairly repetitive and not as relevant as the Letters.

  • Ryan
    2019-05-22 14:24

    Almost uniformly repetitive, formulaic, and dull -- a hard and tiresome slog. Never approaches the concision, directness, or power found in Epictetus or Marcus Aurelius; read them instead. If you're recommending stoic philosophy to a friend, keep this book as far from him as possible.

  • Rob McLean
    2019-05-20 12:30

    Philosophy is often out of the reach of the common reader, it's too complex and convoluted. But Seneca brings the highest philosophic precepts down to where they are accessible to the common man. A must read.

  • Shawn
    2019-05-06 09:45

    I've read some stoic philosophy in the past that I really enjoyed. This not so much though.Each chapter of the book covered a different philosophical area. But he went off on too many tangents and seemed to get off topic quite easily.

  • Olivia
    2019-05-15 09:32

    This *will* drive you over the edge.

  • Nathan Modlin
    2019-05-08 10:43

    Read:On Providence, On Tranquility of Mind, Letter 47: Slaves, and Letter 70: Suicide.

  • Gilbert Wesley Purdy
    2019-05-12 11:49

    I've actually read most of this in other Seneca volumes and use it to compare notes and translations. Mosesx Hadas is an excellent translator and Norton an even better publisher.

  • Zach
    2019-05-12 07:54

    Absolutely incredible.

  • Phillip
    2019-05-03 13:35

    In The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca, representative selections from Seneca's writings offer the reader an excellent introduction to the range of his work.The selections are drawn from the essays, or dialogues, and the "Consolations;" from the treatises, of which "On Clemency," addressed to the young Nero, is included here; and from the Letters to Lucilius, which have to do not only with philosophical subjects but also with Seneca's personal experiences, such as journeys and visits.

  • Brian Denton
    2019-05-17 14:27

    Among the Roman stoics Seneca stands out. Whereas Epictetus is maybe a little too didactic and Marcus Aurelius is maybe a little too lofty, Seneca is the perfect combination of clarity of thought, simplicity of speech, and pragmatism of practice. He's a joy to read. I revisit him frequently. So should you.

  • TR
    2019-05-26 06:50

    An excellent place to start for those interested in the stoics. Seneca's ethics seem more virile than Aurelius'.

  • Nika
    2019-05-10 09:43

    "A victory devoid of danger is a victory devoid of glory."For virtue is not nature's gift; to become good is an art.Letter 90: Philosophy and Progress- Seneca