Read Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age: A Critical Analysis by Neil Selwyn Online

schools-and-schooling-in-the-digital-age-a-critical-analysis

This book presents a wide-ranging and critical exploration of a topic that lies at the heart of contemporary education. The use of digital technology is now a key feature of schools and schooling around the world. Yet despite its prominence, technology use continues to be an area of education that rarely receives sustained critical attention and thought, especially from thThis book presents a wide-ranging and critical exploration of a topic that lies at the heart of contemporary education. The use of digital technology is now a key feature of schools and schooling around the world. Yet despite its prominence, technology use continues to be an area of education that rarely receives sustained critical attention and thought, especially from those people who are most involved and affected by it. Technology tends to be something that many teachers, learners, parents, policy-makers and even academics approach as a routine rather than reflective matter.Tackling the wider picture, addressing the social, cultural, economic, political and commercial aspects of schools and schooling in the digital age, this book offers to make sense of what happens, and what does not happen, when the digital and the educational come together in the guise of schools technology.In particular, the book examines contemporary schooling in terms of social justice, equality and participatory democracy. Seeking to re-politicise an increasingly depoliticised area of educational debate and analysis, setting out to challenge the many contradictions that characterise the field of education technology today, the author concludes by suggesting what forms schools and schooling in the digital age could, and should, take.This is the perfect volume for anyone interested in the application and use of technology in education, as well as the education policy and politics that surround it; many will also find its innovative proposals for technology use an inspiration for their own teaching and learning....

Title : Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age: A Critical Analysis
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780415589307
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 177 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age: A Critical Analysis Reviews

  • Michael Jordan
    2018-09-18 22:24

    I was very excited to see this book, as it asks a lot of very important questions, looking at the implementation of technology in schools through concepts of power, politics, equality, social justice, etc. Selwyn challenges the tacit view that somehow digital technology lies in some rarified space outside of society, culture and politics and, with this neutrality, can be transformative of education. This is an important challenge, as digital technology is a cultural artefact, designed, developed, sold and implemented in particular sociocultural contexts, which reflect and recreate certain power dynamics. It is only in teasing those out into the open that the failure of the promise of digital technology in schools can start to be dealt with. Selwyn wants to tease out those dynamics in the "messy reality" of compulsory education within various contexts such as the lived experiences of teachers and pupils, policy making, school organizational concerns, public v private trends etc. He attempts to make the case that whatever the intentions of the those implementing digital technology in schools, in practice, the variety of power/political and social agendas stymie the potential. My only personal frustrations with the book is that he seems to think that these are the only reasons for the failure of technology implementations. Sometimes it can be (at least partly and not particularly sociologically interesting), bad implementation, bad project management, bad purchasing. I get the impression the schools and teachers can do no wrong. Even stranger for me (I've not read Selwyn before), is that he starts the book saying, "I'm not anti Tech. Honest Guv!" (not a direct quote!)He seems to have been criticised for being a Luddite. However, it is hard to see a positive view of technology in his book. It feels like his fundamental position is that most tech comes from private capital, which is only there for itself, embedding and recreating its own position. His only major positive view is around the use of open source, which in my opinion in weakly argued. (Will be interesting to hear other views).